prime minister – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 04:53:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png prime minister – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Belgium delays nuclear phase-out by 10 years due to war in Ukraine https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/belgium-delays-nuclear-phase-out-by-10-years-due-to-war-in-ukraine/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 22:44:10 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/belgium-delays-nuclear-phase-out-by-10-years-due-to-war-in-ukraine/ Published on: 03/18/2022 – 23:44 Brussels (AFP) – Belgium on Friday delayed its plan to phase out nuclear power by 2025 by a decade, spooked by the huge spike in energy prices due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. “The Federal Government has decided to take the necessary measures to extend the life of two nuclear […]]]>

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Brussels (AFP) – Belgium on Friday delayed its plan to phase out nuclear power by 2025 by a decade, spooked by the huge spike in energy prices due to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

“The Federal Government has decided to take the necessary measures to extend the life of two nuclear reactors by ten years,” Prime Minister Alexander De Croo said in a statement.

“This extension will strengthen our country’s independence from fossil fuels in a turbulent geopolitical environment,” he added.

The push to 2035 comes amid growing calls for neighboring Germany, Europe’s biggest economy, to also rethink its exit from nuclear power, but ministers in Berlin last week doubled down on their pledge countries not to emit atoms despite the price shock.

Europe is scrambling to find ways to wean itself off its energy dependence on Russia, which supplies 40% of Europe’s gas needs, mainly to Germany, Italy and several central European countries.

Prices have skyrocketed for Europeans since Russia invaded Ukraine and EU leaders will meet next week to agree new emergency measures to soften the blow to consumers and businesses .

Belgium currently operates two nuclear power plants with a total of seven reactors.

The promise of a gradual exit from nuclear energy has been enshrined in Belgian law since 2003 and the decision to delay the moratorium again was fiercely opposed by the Greens party.

In Friday’s plan, which was negotiated in a marathon cabinet session, the government agreed to extend the life of the reactors at Doel 4 near the port city of Antwerp and Tihange 3 near Liège until ‘in 2035.

De Croo insisted the decision would give the country certainty after years of wrangling over the wisdom of phasing out nuclear power.

“For too long our country has lacked vision,” De Croo told a press conference. “It caused a lot of uncertainty. The plan we have on the table today addresses that lack of vision.”

The government is to negotiate with French energy giant Engie, owner of nuclear power plants in Belgium, over costs and delivery of the new plan.

Engie had previously indicated that it was too late for the De Croo government to change its mind.

The government has also warned that the two reactors will not be available for the winter of 2025 anyway.

The Greens had made phasing out nuclear power in 2025 a condition for joining a politically fragile seven-party coalition that was painfully cobbled together in 2020, more than a year after inconclusive elections.

But since the February 24 invasion, with soaring energy prices, the party has signaled that it would be willing to consider an alternative scenario.

There have been massive protests against two older reactors – Tihange 2 and Doel 3 – in Germany and other neighboring countries since experts discovered thousands of hairline cracks in reactor pressure vessels in 2012.

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Turkmenistan leader’s son wins presidential election | Election News https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/turkmenistan-leaders-son-wins-presidential-election-election-news/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 08:53:58 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/turkmenistan-leaders-son-wins-presidential-election-election-news/ The electoral commission announces after an unusual delay that Serdar Berdymukhamedov obtained nearly 73% of the votes. Turkmen authorities say the son of the Central Asian country’s leader won the presidential election after an unusual delay in the vote count, establishing a political dynasty in one of the world’s most tightly controlled countries. Serdar Berdymukhamedov, […]]]>

The electoral commission announces after an unusual delay that Serdar Berdymukhamedov obtained nearly 73% of the votes.

Turkmen authorities say the son of the Central Asian country’s leader won the presidential election after an unusual delay in the vote count, establishing a political dynasty in one of the world’s most tightly controlled countries.

Serdar Berdymukhamedov, 40, won 72.97% of the vote in Saturday’s election to lead the gas-rich country and succeed his father Gurbanguly, the Central Election Commission announced on Tuesday.

His closest rival in a field of nine candidates was university official Khyrdyr Nunnayev, who won 11%.

There has been an unexpected wait for the result, after authorities said on Sunday they needed more time to count the votes.

Central Election Committee Chairman Gulmyrat Myradov told reporters that votes were still being counted, including those of people living abroad, and that preliminary results were likely to be released on Monday.

Turkmenistan, a remote country of six million people, usually announces preliminary election results the next day, such as when elder Berdymukhamedov won re-election with more than 97% of the vote in 2017.

No election in Turkmenistan, which became independent with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, has been considered truly competitive.

Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov established a personality cult during the last 15 years of his reign [File: Alexander Vershinin/AP]

Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, 64, announced the vote last month, saying the country should be led by young people.

He had been the country’s leader since being named interim president when the eccentric Saparmurat Niyazov died in December 2006.

The elder Berdymukhamedov established a cult of personality with the title Arkadag, or Protector, and was keen to show off his fitness with stunts, including driving sports cars, target shooting and lifting a barbell weightlifting gold to the applause of his cabinet.

Under his rule, China replaced Russia as the main buyer of Turkmenistan’s vast gas reserves.

“Glorious Path”

Serdar Berdymukhamedov rose through the ranks through a series of increasingly senior government posts and most recently served as the country’s deputy prime minister, reporting directly to his father.

He has just turned 40, the minimum age to become president according to Turkmen law.

“My main goal is to continue on the glorious path of development built for 30 years of independence and to successfully implement programs aimed at ensuring a high level of social conditions for the people,” Serdar Berdymukhamedov said during the presentation of its platform in a televised speech.

Speaking to reporters after casting his vote, he vowed to continue the country’s neutral foreign policy if elected.

During the campaign, all candidates praised Berdymukhamedov’s father, who said he would retain the post of head of the country’s upper house of parliament.

On polling day, folk dancers and singers performed as loud music blared from polling station speakers.

Fumes from burning harmala, a plant widely used in Turkmenistan to fumigate homes and public spaces to help prevent the spread of infectious diseases, swarmed the stations.

A woman dressed in the Turkmen national costume votes at a polling station
A woman dressed in a Turkmen national costume votes at a polling station during the presidential elections in Ashgabat [File: Alexander Vershinin/AP]
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Ukrainian President denounces ‘genocide’ of Mariupol hospital bombing as $13 billion aid bill clears first hurdle | Ukraine https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ukrainian-president-denounces-genocide-of-mariupol-hospital-bombing-as-13-billion-aid-bill-clears-first-hurdle-ukraine/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:27:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ukrainian-president-denounces-genocide-of-mariupol-hospital-bombing-as-13-billion-aid-bill-clears-first-hurdle-ukraine/ Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has condemned a Russian attack on a children’s hospital in the besieged city of Mariupol as evidence of ‘genocide’ as the United States moves to dramatically boost its support for the war-torn country with a program of assistance of $13.6 billion. Ukraine’s president has shared video footage showing massive destruction at […]]]>

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has condemned a Russian attack on a children’s hospital in the besieged city of Mariupol as evidence of ‘genocide’ as the United States moves to dramatically boost its support for the war-torn country with a program of assistance of $13.6 billion.

Ukraine’s president has shared video footage showing massive destruction at the hospital – a combined 600-bed complex with children’s and maternity wards – in the southern port city which was shelled relentlessly for nine days.

“A children’s hospital, a maternity ward. How did they threaten the Russian Federation? What is this country, the Russian Federation, which is afraid of hospitals, of maternities and which destroys them? Zelenskiy said on Telegram.

“Hospitals and schools are destroyed. Churches and ordinary buildings are destroyed. People are killed. Children are killed. The aerial bombardment of a children’s hospital is the ultimate proof that the genocide of Ukrainians is taking place.

The White House condemned the attack as ‘barbaric’ while US House lawmakers voted to rush a $13.6 billion aid package that would boost military and humanitarian support for Ukraine and its European allies. The aid includes $6.5 billion for U.S. costs of sending troops and weapons to Eastern Europe and equipping allied forces there, and $6.8 billion for s occupy refugees and provide economic support to allies. Senate approval is expected within days. The House also passed a bill banning imports of Russian oil.

US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she spoke with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy for 45 minutes on Wednesday. She said they discussed the weapons and other forms of assistance her country needed and “the crimes against humanity that [Vladimir] Putin commits,” including the airstrike on the maternity ward. “He’s the beast that Putin is,” Pelosi said.

Pelosi said the $13.6 billion US aid package was likely just the tip of a much larger aid effort. “We will all have to do more” to help Ukraine in the coming weeks or months and in the long term to help it rebuild, Pelosi said, referring to US and NATO allies.

Meanwhile, the United States has warned that Russia may be preparing to use chemical or biological weapons in the war. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Wednesday that Russia had made “false claims regarding alleged US bioweapons labs and chemical weapons development in Ukraine,” and added that the allegations had been taken up in Beijing.

“Now that Russia has made these false claims and China has apparently endorsed this propaganda, we should all be on the lookout for Russia possibly using chemical or biological weapons in Ukraine, or creating a false flag operation in them. using,” she tweeted. .

Children's hospital and maternity ward hit by Russian bombs, Ukrainian authorities say – video
Children’s hospital and maternity ward hit by Russian bombs, Ukrainian authorities say – video

The concerns came as British intelligence highlighted the strength of Ukrainian resistance. In an update on Thursday, Britain’s Ministry of Defense (MoD) said the large Russian column northwest of Kiev had made “little progress in more than a week” and was suffering continued casualties at the hands of the Ukrainian forces. The Defense Ministry said there had been a noticeable drop in Russian air activity in recent days, likely due to the “unexpected efficiency” of Ukrainian forces. He also said that Russia had deployed conscripted troops despite Putin’s assurances not to do so.

As the Russian president seeks to regain momentum, local authorities have called the damage to Mariupol hospital “colossal” and said women in labor were among the injured.

A local official said the attack injured at least 17 staff, although no deaths were immediately reported. Zelenskiy said the “direct hit by Russian troops” left children under the wreckage.

Deputy Mayor Sergei Orlov said Mariupol was under constant bombardment and 1,170 residents had died, 47 of whom were buried in a mass grave on Wednesday. “It’s medieval,” he said. “It is pure genocide. The attack is not just treacherous. It is a war crime. They attack us with aircraft, shells, several rocket launchers.

The Guardian was unable to fully verify accounts by Ukrainian officials, but video released by The Associated Press showed several injured people at the site of the hospital attack.

The Red Cross described conditions in the port city as “apocalyptic”, while Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said the situation was “catastrophic”. Zelenskiy compared the devastation and suffering there to that caused by the Nazis.

Journalists described unburied corpses in the streets and starving residents breaking into shops in search of food and melting snow for water while thousands of people took shelter in underpasses. floors.

The Russian military also “fired and shelled” a humanitarian corridor agreed with Moscow and intended to allow civilians to exit safely, the city’s deputy mayor said, mined the road and set up a checkpoint. Of around 200,000 people desperate to leave, only 2,000 to 3,000 a day have been able to do so.

On Wednesday, Zelenskiy said at least 35,000 civilians were able to leave the towns of Sumy, Enerhodar and around Kyiv. He said he hoped evacuations would continue on Thursday with three more routes open from Mariupol, Volnovakha in the southeast and Izyum in eastern Ukraine.

Zelenskiy said on Wednesday the threat level against the country was ‘maximum’ and again called on the West to impose a no-fly zone, saying he risked a ‘humanitarian catastrophe’ if he did not. not.

Speaking in Washington, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss reiterated NATO’s position that a no-fly zone would put NATO in direct conflict with Russia.

The conflict has also raised fears of a nuclear accident in a country with major nuclear power plants and site of the Chernobyl disaster. The UN’s atomic watchdog said on Wednesday it had seen “no critical safety impact” at Chernobyl, site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster in 1986, despite a blackout.

But he warned he was not getting updates from Chernobyl or Zaporizhzhia, Europe’s biggest nuclear power plant, which is also now under Russian control.

The UK said the Russians had confirmed the use of a thermobaric rocket system. The weapons, also known as vacuum bombs, draw oxygen from the surrounding air to generate a high temperature explosion.

So far, three rounds of peace talks between the two sides have yielded no progress, with Moscow continuing to insist that Ukraine must “demilitarize” and enshrine neutrality in its constitution before putting an end to what she calls a “special military operation” aimed at ensuring Russia’s security. Moscow insisted on Wednesday that it would prefer to achieve its goals through negotiation.

In other developments:

  • Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov landed in Turkey on Thursday for face-to-face talks with his Ukrainian counterpart Dmytro Kuleba, the highest-level meeting between the two countries since Russia’s invasion. Kuleba warned in a Facebook video that his expectations were “limited”. So far, the sides have engaged in lower-level talks in Belarus, largely on humanitarian issues and involving only Ukrainian officials.

  • EU27 leaders are due to meet in Versailles on Thursday and Friday. A draft declaration prepared for the summit read: “Russia’s war of aggression constitutes a tectonic shift in European history. Leaders expected to discuss reducing bloc’s energy dependence on Russia and Ukraine’s bid to join EU

  • The United States is considering sanctions against nuclear energy supplier Rosatom, a senior Biden administration official said on Wednesday.

  • Nestle, cigarette maker Philip Morris and Sony joined the list of multinationals pulling out of the country on Wednesday.

Agencies contributed to this report

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Kremlin says US has declared ‘economic war’ on Russia https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kremlin-says-us-has-declared-economic-war-on-russia/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 17:17:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kremlin-says-us-has-declared-economic-war-on-russia/ U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during the IBEW Local 553 Apprentice Training Program at Durham Technical College March 2, in Durham, North Carolina. (Allison Joyce/AFP/Getty Images) US Vice President Kamala Harris will discuss the thorny issue of delivering Soviet-era planes to Ukraine during his visit to Poland this week, senior administration officials said ahead […]]]>
U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during the IBEW Local 553 Apprentice Training Program at Durham Technical College March 2, in Durham, North Carolina. (Allison Joyce/AFP/Getty Images)

US Vice President Kamala Harris will discuss the thorny issue of delivering Soviet-era planes to Ukraine during his visit to Poland this week, senior administration officials said ahead of his departure.

Harris’ visit was complicated when Poland issued a surprise statement saying it would hand over its MiG fighter jets to the United States instead of giving them directly to Ukraine, an idea that was flatly rejected by Washington.

“There are a lot of ideas on the table. As you saw in the Pentagon statement, we believe this one is not tenable, but we certainly want and encourage all allies to come forward with ideas. And for us to stay in very close coordination at all levels,” a senior administration official said.

The official said Harris would engage Poland’s leaders – including the president and prime minister – on the issue when she meets with them in Warsaw on Thursday.

“We have been in dialogue with the Poles for some time on how best to provide a variety of security assistance to Ukraine. And it is a dialogue that will absolutely continue until and within the framework of the trip. of the vice president,” the official said.

“This is a key priority for us and for all of our NATO allies. So we expect us to keep talking about how to achieve this really important goal. A number of people have had a variety of ideas and we think they are all worth discussing and that is what we will continue to do.

A pair of MIG-29s belonging to the Polish Air Force at the 22nd Command at Malbork Air Base, Poland, Aug. 27.
A pair of MIG-29s belonging to the Polish Air Force at the 22nd Command at Malbork Air Base, Poland, Aug. 27. (Cuneyt Karadag/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Harris is traveling to Poland and Romania at a critical time for Europe and for the Biden administration.

“The past two months have all been very focused on what has tragically become a defining issue for the entire administration,” said a second senior administration official.

Harris, for her part, has “really been immersed in this,” the first official said, “working intensely on a daily basis on all issues related to the ongoing crisis resulting from the Russian invasion.”

Also on the program: In Warsaw, Harris will also meet with refugees who have fled violence in Ukraine, as well as US diplomats who have moved to Poland from the US Embassy in Kyiv, which has been closed.

She will also meet Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who is visiting at the same time, and address U.S. and Polish troops on Friday.

The United States has moved nearly 5,000 additional troops to Poland in a show of comfort in the face of Russian aggression.

From Poland, Harris travels to Romania, where she will meet with the country’s president and the staff of the United States Embassy.

Officials said Harris arrived in Europe with a three-part message: that the United States stands with its NATO allies, that it will continue to stand with the people of Ukraine, and that Putin made a mistake that would result in a ” resounding defeat” for Russia. .

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Luc Montagnier (1932-2022) https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/luc-montagnier-1932-2022/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 17:06:53 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/luc-montagnier-1932-2022/ Credit: Jean Guichard/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Luc Montagnier achieved scientific notoriety and won a Nobel Prize for co-discovering HIV. His work has led to the development of diagnostic tests and treatments that have saved countless lives. He spent his final years dismantling this hard-earned reputation by espousing fringe theories and opposing vaccination. His baseless claims about COVID-19 — […]]]>

Credit: Jean Guichard/Gamma-Rapho/Getty

Luc Montagnier achieved scientific notoriety and won a Nobel Prize for co-discovering HIV. His work has led to the development of diagnostic tests and treatments that have saved countless lives. He spent his final years dismantling this hard-earned reputation by espousing fringe theories and opposing vaccination. His baseless claims about COVID-19 — that vaccines cause dangerous variants to emerge, or that the virus was engineered — have been weaponized by disinformation campaigns. He died on February 8 at the age of 89.

Montagnier was born on August 18, 1932 in Chabris, France. World War II scarred her childhood with hunger and uncertainty, but her interest in science blossomed early on. He got into the business that spawned countless researchers: tinkering with explosive compounds in a home lab. Later, he installed an accelerated camera on a microscope and studied the response of chloroplasts to light. He was inspired to become a virologist after learning of the discovery in 1957 that tobacco mosaic virus RNA could transmit infection.

Montagnier worked in several laboratories before landing at the Institut Pasteur in Paris in 1972, developing his expertise in virology along the way. He specialized in retroviruses, RNA viruses capable of inserting a DNA copy of their genetic material into the genome of their host. This, along with advances in culturing immune cells and his use of reagents that block antiviral proteins called interferons to reawaken dormant retroviruses in the cells, proved useful in 1983. A colleague sent him tissue from lymph nodes taken from a French fashion designer believed to be in the early stages of AIDS.

By the time people were diagnosed with AIDS, they were often already living with a variety of infections, cancers and other disorders that made it difficult to find the source of the disease. Researchers speculated wildly: some blamed fungus or chemical exposure. Others have seen that a class of immune cells called CD4+ T cells were depleted in people with AIDS and wondered if the body’s immune system was targeting them. Montagnier was reminded of a known retrovirus that could infect CD4+ T-lymphocytes, and it was transmitted through blood and sexual activity.

In the Montagnier virology unit at the Institut Pasteur, Françoise Barré-Sinoussi isolated a new retrovirus from lymph node biopsy; the team called it lymphadenopathy-associated virus (LAV; F. Barre-Sinoussi et al. Science 220, 868–871; 1983). When, in September 1983, Montagnier presented the results in a small, late-night session of a scientific meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York, his audience was skeptical. “This situation is not uncommon in science, as new discoveries are often controversial,” he wrote in his biography of the Nobel Prize.

Shortly after this presentation, a team led by virologist Robert Gallo, then at the US National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, helped solidify the link between AIDS and the virus that Montagnier’s team had found ( officially named HIV in 1986). Gallo had previously discovered other retroviruses that infect human cells, called human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLV)-I and HTLV-II. In 1984, his team isolated a retrovirus from samples taken from people with AIDS, and he called it HTLV-III. But it turned out to be identical to LAV, samples of which Montagnier had provided to his laboratory.

The two teams then waged an epic patent war over who should own the intellectual property rights to a diagnostic test based on the virus. Finally, in 1987, peace was brokered by US President Ronald Reagan and French Prime Minister Jacques Chirac, who agreed to share test royalties between the two countries and create an international fund for research and education on AIDS.

Given this history, many were surprised when, in 2008, Gallo was not awarded a share of the Nobel Prize. Instead, Montagnier shared the physiology or medicine prize with Barré-Sinoussi; virologist Harald zur Hausen was also honored, for his unrelated discovery that human papillomaviruses are linked to cervical cancer.

After the discovery of HIV, Montagnier’s work took a shocking turn. He has published a series of controversial papers claiming that highly diluted DNA from certain pathogens emits electromagnetic waves. He invoked the debunked notion of “water memory”, arguing that water is modified by DNA in a way that retains certain properties of the molecules even when they have been greatly diluted. (The concept of water memory was championed by French immunologist Jacques Benveniste in a 1988 study Nature document that later turned out not to be reproducible (J. Maddox et al. Nature 334, 287–290; 1988)). At the age of 78, Montagnier left France to head a research institute at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, to study the issue.

Over time, Montagnier seemed to not only be comfortable with controversy, but also court it. He embraced homeopathy and pseudoscientific ideas about autism. “It has reached a stage where no researcher has been able to provide comments or explanations on its late evolution,” explains Bernard Meunier, former president of the French Academy of Sciences. Others were more direct: “Luc Montagnier lost it”, writes Science columnist and chemist Derek Lowe in 2012.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Nobel Laureate de Montagnier lent weight to his damaging views that the COVID-19 vaccine could be harmful. At the end of his life, the image of his face was circulating on social media in anti-vaccination memes. Hard to believe he was once featured on commemorative postage stamps honoring his contributions to public health.

Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

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A resilience test for European solidarity – European Council on Foreign Relations https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-resilience-test-for-european-solidarity-european-council-on-foreign-relations/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-resilience-test-for-european-solidarity-european-council-on-foreign-relations/ Russia attacks Ukraine Read more on Russia attacks Ukraine “We only know each other to the extent that we have been tested.” Most Poles recognize this line from a poem by Nobel laureate Wislawa Szymborska. Today, following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Europeans face a test of solidarity. Time will tell what this will teach them […]]]>

“We only know each other to the extent that we have been tested.” Most Poles recognize this line from a poem by Nobel laureate Wislawa Szymborska.

Today, following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Europeans face a test of solidarity. Time will tell what this will teach them about themselves – but, as things stand, their performance at political and societal levels has been exemplary.

European governments and institutions reacted boldly and quickly, imposing massive sanctions on the Russian economy. They also sent military aid to Ukraine and even discussed the prospect of the country joining the European Union – with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen saying that Ukraine is “one of us and we want her to go”.

The mobilization of European citizens deserves equal attention. In less than a week, only Poland has hosted over 500,000 Ukrainian refugees, with thousands of ordinary Poles involved in helping them: hosting them in their own homes, transporting them across the country and sending aid to those who remained in Ukraine. And, on February 27, several hundred thousand people gathered in Berlin to protest against the Russian invasion. Similar rallies took place in towns and cities across Europe.

The Europeans therefore show that their solidarity is not only theoretical. As an ECFR survey carried out in January 2022 in seven EU countries (Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Romania and Sweden) demonstrated, many Europeans were quick to come to the aid of Ukraine by case of Russian aggression since before the invasion. This was particularly the case in Poland, where 62% of respondents wanted to help Ukraine even if it meant that a large number of refugees would cross the border. Today, they show that they meant it. Faced with the reality of war, more than 90 percent Poles currently say they want to help displaced Ukrainians.

Some EU member states are radically reassessing their policies in response to the war. Germany is leading the way in this area. The country surprised many observers by shutting down Nord Stream 2, sending weapons to Ukraine and announcing a big increase in defense spending. Germany is even reversing its decision to close all its nuclear power plants. But things are also changing elsewhere. Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi recently admitted it was unwise for his country to rely so heavily on Russian gas imports and called on the EU to develop joint energy storage capacities. Austria – which once served as a gateway to Europe for Russian companies – reacted strongly despite its exposure to the consequences of Western sanctions against Russia. Meanwhile, in France, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s aggression has been condemned even by his traditional supporters, far-right presidential candidates Marine Le Pen and Eric Zemmour. So far, so good.

What is at stake here is Europe’s ability to continue to support Ukraine if the war lasts several months or years.

However, Putin’s war in Ukraine and Western economic sanctions against Russia will certainly have negative effects on the European economy. Currently, the EU imports around 40% of its gas from Russia, according to Eurostat. In the event of an escalation in which Russia cut off gas supplies to Europe, there would be energy shortages across the continent. As Russia and Ukraine account for around 30% of world wheat exports, the conflict is already resulting in a rise in international wheat prices. This will only add to the inflationary pressure in Europe created by the pandemic. In addition, the number of refugees fleeing Ukraine is expected to increase – maybe seven million in the event of a long-term conflict, according to the European Commissioner for Crises, Janez Lenarcic.

Unsurprisingly, some politicians are already trying to cast doubt on European commitments. In France, for example, Le Pen warned that sanctions should not harm the purchasing power of French citizens. And Zemmour wants Ukrainian refugees to stay in Poland: “It’s not good to take people away from their country like that – to destabilize France, which is already overwhelmed by immigration,” he added. . argued in a recent interview. In Przemysl, a Polish town near the Ukrainian border, members of the extreme right have recently attacked Ukrainian refugees belonging to ethnic minorities.

In Poland and other European countries, there has been a sharp increase in Russian disinformation about the war in Ukraine. The longer the conflict lasts, the easier it will be for such misinformation to gain traction. Indeed, as voters begin to feel the economic consequences of sanctions and become more concerned that EU countries will be drawn into war, the current near-consensus will become more vulnerable. Discussion of Ukraine’s EU membership could also easily get carried away, giving Eurosceptics a perfect opportunity to strike fear among voters.

Therefore, to sustain solidarity today, the EU should first and foremost prepare its institutions to face long-term disruptions. First, it must build solidarity mechanisms to offset the costs of EU sanctions for member states and help them maintain their energy supply: as others have noted, public support for the sanctions can only be maintained if the 27 are reassured that their energy needs will be met. The EU should also support Poland and other Central European Member States which are currently hosting the largest number of Ukrainian refugees. And Member States must also develop institutional solutions, because Ukrainian refugees cannot rely indefinitely on public goodwill and NGOs alone.

To maintain solidarity, the EU will also have to take the concerns of European citizens seriously. Currently, they may feel helpless in the face of the horror they see live 24 hours a day in the media. They don’t need to be tricked into believing that the war will have no impact on their lives. But they still need to be reassured that European governments are ready to do whatever it takes to cushion this impact. On March 2, French President Emmanuel Macron just do that: he prepared his compatriots for the economic consequences of the war, while reassuring them that the French State would protect them in these difficult times. Citizens may also appreciate advice on how they can help Ukraine – to prevent them from feeling helpless. For example, governments could encourage them to lower their thermostats and thus consume less energy – an individual gesture of solidarity with the country which could prove crucial in the event of an energy shortage.

What is at stake here is Europe’s ability to continue to support Ukraine if the war lasts several months or years. Sooner or later, public acceptance of such an intense effort could falter, limiting the EU’s ability to conduct the values-based foreign policy that, in peacetime, Europeans expect of their leaders. Some politicians will try to feed on the resulting feeling of insecurity, offering the illusion of neutrality and the possibility of isolating themselves from the consequences of war. They should not be given the opportunity to flourish.

The European Council on Foreign Relations does not take a collective position. ECFR publications represent the views of its individual authors only.

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France, applying sanctions against Russia, seizes a ship in the English Channel https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/france-applying-sanctions-against-russia-seizes-a-ship-in-the-english-channel/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 15:56:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/france-applying-sanctions-against-russia-seizes-a-ship-in-the-english-channel/ BOULOGNE-SUR-MER, France, Feb 26 (Reuters) – France on Saturday seized a car cargo ship in the English Channel that Washington said was linked to the son of a former Russian spy chief, in one of the first visible exhibits The West is applying sanctions to Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine. The “Baltic Leader” was […]]]>

BOULOGNE-SUR-MER, France, Feb 26 (Reuters) – France on Saturday seized a car cargo ship in the English Channel that Washington said was linked to the son of a former Russian spy chief, in one of the first visible exhibits The West is applying sanctions to Moscow for its invasion of Ukraine.

The “Baltic Leader” was heading for Saint Petersburg but was diverted to the port of Boulogne-sur-Mer in northern France between 03:00 and 04:00 (02:00-03:00 GMT), Captain Véronique Magnin told Reuters. the French maritime prefecture.

The ship was “strongly suspected of being linked to sanctioned Russian interests”, she said.

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The U.S. Treasury Department issued restraint sanctions against the ship because the Treasury said it was owned by a subsidiary of Russian lender Promsvyazbank, one of the Russian entities hit by U.S. and government sanctions. ‘European Union.

The bank’s CEO, Pyotr Fradkov, is the son of Mikhail Fradkov, a former head of Russia’s foreign intelligence service, who also served as prime minister under Russian President Vladimir Putin. Piotr Fradkov himself was included in the latest round of US sanctions.

Promsvyazbank, in a comment sent to Reuters, said its subsidiary no longer owned the Baltic Leader and was purchased by another entity before the sanctions were imposed.

France’s economy ministry, in a statement, said the ship’s owner was PZB Lizing, a subsidiary of Promsvyazbank, and that the ship had been intercepted under EU sanctions against the lender and its subsidiaries.

Magnin, spokesman for the maritime prefecture, said continuous checks were carried out by customs officers and that the ship’s crew “were cooperative”.

The Russian Embassy in Paris will send a protest note to the French Foreign Ministry over the seizure, the embassy said in a statement sent to Reuters.

The embassy also said the ship’s crew had been allowed to disembark and move freely in the port.

A Reuters photographer in Boulogne-sur-Mer said the ship was moored alongside.

The United States, EU and other Western states this week imposed significant new financial and trade sanctions on Russia after it sent military forces to neighboring Ukraine.

The US Treasury Department said Promsvyazbank was under sanctions “for operating or operating in the defense and related financial equipment and services sectors of the economy of the Russian Federation.” It has also been targeted by EU sanctions. Read more

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Additional reports from Tassilo Hummel and the Moscow office; Written by Tassilo Hummel and Christian Lowe; Editing by Frank Jack Daniel

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Greek parliament approves major arms deals with France | Economic news https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/greek-parliament-approves-major-arms-deals-with-france-economic-news/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 20:49:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/greek-parliament-approves-major-arms-deals-with-france-economic-news/ By DEREK GATOPOULOS, Associated Press ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece’s parliament on Tuesday approved a 3 billion euro ($3.4 billion) deal for three new French-made frigates that defense officials say are key to coping persistent tensions with neighboring Turkey. Lawmakers also voted to add six new Rafale fighter jets to an existing order of 18 […]]]>

By DEREK GATOPOULOS, Associated Press

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece’s parliament on Tuesday approved a 3 billion euro ($3.4 billion) deal for three new French-made frigates that defense officials say are key to coping persistent tensions with neighboring Turkey.

Lawmakers also voted to add six new Rafale fighter jets to an existing order of 18 planes, including six newly built and 12 that were previously in service with the French Air Force.

NATO members Greece and Turkey remain at odds over maritime borders and mining rights in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean. A Turkish oil and gas investigation in 2020 resulted in a tense naval standoff between the two countries.

Defense Minister Nikos Panagiotopoulos said Greece’s military needed to modernize following repeated budget cuts during the country’s acute financial crisis of 2010-18.

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“There is no armament program that is ‘slightly necessary’ or ‘somewhat necessary’,” Panagiotopoulos told lawmakers Monday during a committee debate in parliament.

“All the weapons programs that we have submitted for approval, in one way or another, are absolutely necessary for the armed forces – extremely necessary, urgent.”

The purchases were approved by all 157 lawmakers in the centre-right government in the 300-seat parliament, with backing from two opposition parties. The left-wing opposition party opposed the additional purchase of French fighter jets.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and French President Emmanuel Macron finalized the frigates deal as well as an enhanced defense cooperation agreement between their countries last year.

Mitsotakis denied claims by political opponents that the purchases could rattle Greece’s economy, which is already struggling with high deficits due to pandemic spending and a huge national debt worth more than double the country’s annual output. .

“The program responds to the needs of the armed forces, it helps keep our alliances strong, it is implemented at a rapid pace and it mobilizes the forces of our national economy, but it will not upset the necessary fiscal balance,” he said. he told lawmakers.

Manufactured by the French naval group, two warships are due for delivery in 2025 and the third the following year, with an option to add a fourth frigate which will be ready in 2027. ___ Follow Gatopoulos on https://twitter.com/ dgatopoulos

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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The location of the Netaji statue should have been better chosen https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-location-of-the-netaji-statue-should-have-been-better-chosen/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 08:02:46 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-location-of-the-netaji-statue-should-have-been-better-chosen/ In the early morning of August 13, 1965, a dozen members of the new “Samyukta Socialist Party”, a splinter group from India’s “Praja Socialist Party”, slithered through the deserted avenues of New Delhi with hammers, scissors , ladders and tar buckets, towards the imposing white marble statue of King George V under a cupola, 150 […]]]>

In the early morning of August 13, 1965, a dozen members of the new “Samyukta Socialist Party”, a splinter group from India’s “Praja Socialist Party”, slithered through the deserted avenues of New Delhi with hammers, scissors , ladders and tar buckets, towards the imposing white marble statue of King George V under a cupola, 150 meters on the east side of India Gate.

The gate was built by the British in memory of 90,000 British Indian Army soldiers who died overseas during the Great War (WW1) and the Afghan ‘War of Independence’. The India Gate complex was part of the work of the Imperial War Graves Commission which came into existence in December 1917.

The socialists climbed the king’s statue, cut off part of the nose, ear and crown and poured tar over the sculpture. They ended their campaign by hanging a portrait of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose. In the process, there was a brief scuffle with two police officers on duty. It took three years for the statue of the king to be removed.

It was not the first time that the statue of the King Emperor was vandalized. On the night of January 3, 1943, in the midst of the Quit India movement, some Indian National Congress leaders climbed over the statue, broke its nose and draped it with a large black cloth that read “Death to the Tyrant “.

Fifty-seven years later, the socialists’ mission seems to be succeeding. Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced that a granite statue of Netaji would be placed under the imposing sandstone cupola designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

It is the second time that a statue of Netaji has been placed in the capital on a pedestal built for a British ruler.

Previously, in 1975, a statue of Subhas Chandra Bose was installed in Edward Park (now called Netaji Park) near the Jama Masjid and the Red Fort, on an abandoned pedestal where a towering equestrian statue of King Edward VII once stood. This means Netaji now replaces two British monarchs from their place in the nation’s capital. One wonders why Netaji could not receive a specially designed pedestal for his statue on land in New Delhi as a symbol of India’s “debt” to him. Why such a misery of space just for him?

Following the action of the Socialist Party of Samyukta, the government evoked, in February 1966, the idea of ​​installing a statue of Gandhi under the canopy near the gate of India in place of the statue of King George V. The distinguished sculptor, Ram Sutar, has started work on the statue. Its design was approved by the government in 1979. But that government collapsed. The project faded into the background.

On November 23, 1981, the government informed Parliament that “various aspects such as the site, shape and size of the statue have been examined by the government. A final decision on this should be made soon. But in reality nothing was moving. Sutar was still working on the statue. No target completion date was given to him. Controversy erupted whenever a location was suggested for the installation of Gandhi’s statue.

Eleven years later, a Union cabinet meeting held in July 1992 adopted a proposal for the statue to be placed at India Gate, “leaving the exact location to be decided by the Minister for Urban Development in consultation with others”. In 1994, the Cabinet decided to develop the area around the India Gate as “August Kranti Udyan” and put the statue of Mahatma Gandhi there. They also said there were many alternative proposals for the exact location of the statue. Finally, in 1995, a group of ministers, on instructions from the Union cabinet, reconsidered the matter and recommended that the statue be installed under the canopy.

Historians, town planners and architects have protested that the India Gate compound was part of the original Rajpath layout and should not be altered. They felt that the canopy should remain empty as a “symbol of the end of the Raj” and that it was not appropriate to install a single chieftain statue. Conversely, a proposal to demolish the canopy also did not find favor with the developers.

In response to a written petition, the Delhi High Court issued an interim order in July 1995 “restraining the government from altering/removing/demolishing the canopy of the India Gate complex”.

An RTI filed with the Central Department of Public Works in 2008 led the CPWD to deny that the Mahatma statue was to be installed in the empty canopy.

The Ministry of Urban Development, in response to a question in parliament in 2009, clarified that there was a decade-old plan in the ministry to install a statue of Mahatma Gandhi at India Gate. The plan, however, had been put in cold storage following a written petition on the matter (although the High Court decided the case in March 2005). The minister added that the issue had not been addressed since 2005 – “there is no immediate request or proposal to install a statue of Gandhi at India Gate”, he said . The status quo has been maintained ever since.

Following a controversy over the rejection of a West Bengal painting of Netaji for the 73rd Republic Day Parade, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s sudden announcement on the installation of a statue of Netaji on the previously disputed and currently abandoned canopy near India Gate was seen by many as a political diversion. tactical.

A traffic cop in Bombay, 1945. Photo: Pinterest/Shrikant Patil

Many find the posture of the salute – as seen in footage released by the government – not correct and unsuitable for the Supreme Commander as seen in photos of Netaji giving a salute in Singapore, Tokyo or even earlier in Germany. The location of the statue under the canopy also raises the question: from whom does he receive salvation? It faces India Gate, a war memorial for Indian soldiers killed in World War I, but the Amar Jawan Jyoti has been moved to a location that will be behind it at the National War Memorial. Rashtrapati Bhavan is also more than 3 km away, so the Netaji statue cannot be connected there either. To avoid these controversies, many believe that any changes to this heritage neighborhood should only have been made after proper deliberation and public consultation, including with experts.

Speaking personally, Netaji in this posture, saluting, standing on a pedestal under a cupola, draws a strong resemblance to a traffic cop standing on a covered gazebo at a road intersection. What I hate the most is the roof over Netaji’s head. His stature and size are immense. It shouldn’t look like it’s locked between four pillars and a roof above.

Netaji is a key figure in the Indian freedom struggle and the location of his statue should have been decided after considering various aspects and with due care. Some have argued that it was inappropriate to give it the space previously occupied by a British ruler, that too which was a memorial built after the king’s death. In other words, such a location is not suitable for a great hero. No wonder the Delhites also did not allow Gandhi’s statue to appear at this site. But surprisingly this time, people are silent. The opinion of the Delhi Urban Art Commission seems to be under control. Maybe Vijay Chowk could have been a better location.

We hear Modi talking about transparency in the workings of government. Had it been practiced here, these dissonant concerns might have been avoided.

Sumeru Roy Chaudhury graduated in Architecture from IIT Kharagpur. He was the chief architect of the CPWD. He studied the Netaji files and related documents in detail.

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Former Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri suspends his political role and will not stand for election https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/former-lebanese-prime-minister-saad-hariri-suspends-his-political-role-and-will-not-stand-for-election/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:32:12 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/former-lebanese-prime-minister-saad-hariri-suspends-his-political-role-and-will-not-stand-for-election/ Published on: 01/24/2022 – 16:32 Lebanon’s leading Sunni Muslim politician, Saad al-Hariri, said on Monday he was suspending his role in politics and would not run in the upcoming legislative elections, a bombshell announcement amid a national financial meltdown. Three-time prime minister Hariri also called on his party not to field any candidates in the […]]]>

Published on:

Lebanon’s leading Sunni Muslim politician, Saad al-Hariri, said on Monday he was suspending his role in politics and would not run in the upcoming legislative elections, a bombshell announcement amid a national financial meltdown.

Three-time prime minister Hariri also called on his party not to field any candidates in the elections, saying several factors were behind his decision, including Iranian influence – a reference to the heavily armed Shia group Hezbollah.

“I am convinced that there is no room for a positive opportunity for Lebanon in light of Iranian influence, international disarray, national division, bigotry and state collapse. “, did he declare.

“We will continue to serve our people, but our decision is to suspend any role in power, in politics and in parliament,” Hariri said in a live televised speech, his voice cracking with emotion as he spoke in front of a crowd. portrait of his father.

Hariri inherited the political mantle from his father, Rafik al-Hariri, after his assassination in 2005. But while he remains the Sunni leader, his political fortunes have waned in recent years, with his position weakened by the loss of support Saudi.

Hariri’s announcement comes as Lebanon is suffering from an economic collapse that the World Bank has described as one of the worst ever recorded in the world. The sectarian elite failed to take action to deal with the crisis even as most of the population fell into poverty.

“Free hand for Hezbollah”

Reacting to the shocking announcement, Lebanon’s leading Druze politician said Hariri’s decision not to leave politics “means carte blanche for Hezbollah and the Iranians”.

Walid Joumblatt said he was very saddened by the decision of Lebanon’s main Sunni Muslim politician. “We are losing a pillar of independence and moderation,” Jumblatt said.

Having led the opposition to Hezbollah’s arsenal for years, Hariri was widely seen as pushing the issue aside as he began to make political compromises with the powerful Shiite group and some of its allies.

This resulted in a deal in 2016 that made Hezbollah-allied Christian politician Michel Aoun the president, with Hariri becoming prime minister for the second time.

While continuing to oppose Hezbollah’s possession of weapons, Hariri described the arsenal as a regional problem bigger than Lebanon, where he said the focus should be on resolving economic issues . Anti-Hezbollah hawks have accused him of compromising, and the decision has cost him support from oil-rich Saudi Arabia.

(FRANCE 24 with REUTERS)

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