Museum – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 20:44:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png Museum – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Exploring the human conception of motherhood at the MassArt Art Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/exploring-the-human-conception-of-motherhood-at-the-massart-art-museum/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 20:33:41 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/exploring-the-human-conception-of-motherhood-at-the-massart-art-museum/ This week, GBH Arts Editor Jared Bowen sits down with the Morning Edition team to bring you the latest exhibits from Boston’s art museums. Design motherhood Now at the MassArt Art Museum until December 18 This free exhibition at MassArt Museum of Art is “an exceptionally timely thing to do this weekend,” according to Bowen. […]]]>

This week, GBH Arts Editor Jared Bowen sits down with the Morning Edition team to bring you the latest exhibits from Boston’s art museums.

Design motherhood

Now at the MassArt Art Museum until December 18

This free exhibition at MassArt Museum of Art is “an exceptionally timely thing to do this weekend,” according to Bowen. “Designing Motherhood” takes viewers through the story of pregnancy, birth and motherhood, motivated by the fact that “it affects all of us, we are all born,” as curator Michelle Millar Fisher explains. . “We wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for that one act,” Millar says.

The exhibition’s curators hope “Designing Motherhood” will challenge the public’s understanding of human reproduction and what it means to be a mother in an age when so many modern pregnancy resources come from “people without wombs designed for people with uterus,” says curator Michelle Miller Fisher. The works on display range from photography to historical technologies to sculpture, including an artist’s interpretation of their wooden pregnant belly.

Draw the curtain

Now at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum until 9/11

Maurice Sendak is perhaps best known for his work as an author and illustrator, notably for his 1963 children’s book where the wild things are. A new exposure at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, however, presents another facet of Sendak’s career: his work in designing sets and costumes for opera.

Sendak designed elements not only for a lyrical adaptation of where the wild things arebut also of Mozart The magic fluteby Prokofiev The Love of Three Orangesand Nutcracker among others. As Bowen describes it, the exhibit is “fun”, because “you walk in and you encounter music, you encounter real scenery and scenery, and you can feel the 3D elements of its design”.

Curator Diana Greenwald says that “you feel like there are these little breadcrumbs of her identity popping up” in Sendak’s featured work. Sendak describes himself as “having grown up Jewish, gay, [and] chronically ill,” and many of his stories feature themes of strength, childhood resilience, and adventure — all of which are reflected in “Drawing the Curtain.”

Drawing the curtain: drawings by Maurice Sendak for the opera and the ball

Amanda Guerra/Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum,

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City Life Org – Brooklyn Museum announces public programs in July for visitors of all ages https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/city-life-org-brooklyn-museum-announces-public-programs-in-july-for-visitors-of-all-ages/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:19:37 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/city-life-org-brooklyn-museum-announces-public-programs-in-july-for-visitors-of-all-ages/ Yoga on the Stoop at the Brooklyn Museum, May 2022. (Photo: Kolin Mendez Photography) In-person and virtual programming welcomes community members to the Museum The Brooklyn Museum presents strong programming for adults and children in July, including musical performances, an artist-led nature walk, and more. Other programs include lectures, classes, tours, and special events that […]]]>

Yoga on the Stoop at the Brooklyn Museum, May 2022. (Photo: Kolin Mendez Photography)

In-person and virtual programming welcomes community members to the Museum

The Brooklyn Museum presents strong programming for adults and children in July, including musical performances, an artist-led nature walk, and more. Other programs include lectures, classes, tours, and special events that amplify the Museum’s exhibits and collection, serve the surrounding community, and support learning through the visual arts.

Masks are optional for staff and visitors. Some events and programs may require proof of vaccination in order to attend; please review your tickets carefully for up-to-date requirements. Some programs will take place online and through the Museum’s social media channels.

Museum members enjoy free or discounted tickets and early access to public programs.

The full program is as follows:

We are talking about virtual art
Thursday July 7, 6-7 p.m.

On line
Free, reserve tickets in advance.

Participants join other English language learners to practice their conversational English skills in a discussion inspired by an artwork. All levels of English proficiency are welcome.

Performance: Baseera Khan presents I am an archive
Thursday, July 7, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Auditorium Iris and B. Gerald Cantor, 3rd floor
Tickets are $25 and include after-hours admission to Baseera Khan: I Am an Archive.

Check out the first live performance of artist Baseera Khan’s debut album, featured in our special exhibition Baseera Khan: I Am An Archive. Khan is joined by vocalist/bassist Caithlin De Marrais and guitarist Kaia Fischer of Rainer Maria, and drummer Stuart Gunter of Chamomile & Whiskey.

Yoga on the porch
Saturday July 9 and 16 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Brooklyn Museum Plaza (rain location: Beaux-Arts Court, 3rd floor)
Tickets are $16 and include general admission to the Museum. Tickets including admission to Virgil Abloh: “Figures of Speech” are $25.

The Museum starts the day on the steps of the square with yoga and meditation in a gentle course, open to all levels and led by local instructors. Please bring your own mat.

Art Talk and Nature Walk: Mona Chalabi with Herban Cura
Saturday July 9, 2-4 p.m.

Brooklyn Museum Plaza
Tickets are $25 and include general admission to the Museum.

Join artist and data journalist Mona Chalabi for a conversation about environmental justice and climate change through her new installation The Gray-Green Divide. The talk is followed by a nature walk exploring local trees and plants with artist, herbalist and co-founder of Herban Cura Antonia Estela Pérez.

Virtual art skins
Thursday July 14, 6.30–7.30 p.m.

On line
Free, reserve tickets in advance.

Spanish language speakers and learners are invited to practice exchanging ideas in Spanish with informal conversation inspired by a work of art. All levels of Spanish fluency are welcome.

drink and draw
Thursday, July 21, from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden, 1st Floor
Tickets are $35 and include after-hours admission to Monet to Morisot, your own Brooklyn Museum bag, and a free drink.

Sketch live models, listen to musical sets from local DJs and enjoy refreshing drinks in this episode of our monthly Life Drawing Lessons series, celebrating works from the Museum’s European art collection.

Jazz in the garden: Abdou Mboup and Waakaw
Sunday July 24, 2-4 p.m.

Steinberg Family Sculpture Garden, 1st Floor
Free and open to the public.

In this month’s episode of the Museum’s Sculpture Garden performance series, multi-instrumentalist Abdou Mboup incorporates the jazz ensemble music of his band, Waakaw, into the tradition of the griots of his native Senegal. This program is presented in partnership with Jazz Foundation of America.

An Evening with Lorraine O’Grady
Thursday, July 28, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Auditorium Iris and B. Gerald Cantor, 3rd floor
Tickets are $25.

Experience the debut of multi-hyphenated artist Lorraine O’Grady’s first new performance character since her breakthrough entry as Miss Bourgeoise Noire in the 1980s. Also enjoy the first screening of Greetings and Theses, followed by of a round table.

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This Columbus museum offers personal insight into veterans’ experiences https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/this-columbus-museum-offers-personal-insight-into-veterans-experiences/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 04:45:27 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/this-columbus-museum-offers-personal-insight-into-veterans-experiences/ You’ll find one of the most impactful museums for American veterans in Columbus, Ohio. As the only museum in the country dedicated to honoring veterans of all branches of service, the National Veterans Museum and Memorial was designed to give voice to the true and complex stories of veterans. It helps visitors understand their personal […]]]>

You’ll find one of the most impactful museums for American veterans in Columbus, Ohio. As the only museum in the country dedicated to honoring veterans of all branches of service, the National Veterans Museum and Memorial was designed to give voice to the true and complex stories of veterans. It helps visitors understand their personal experiences and better understand the sacrifices made by American veterans and their families.

The unusual and eye-catching building itself is the beginning of the story the museum tells. It was designed specifically as a tribute to the inner strength of veterans with the way the building appears to naturally rise from the ground. The exterior architecture also matches the interior design, with exhibits that line the curve of the building’s rings.

The museum’s most recent and thought-provoking exhibit is The Twenty Years’ War: Our Greatest Next Generationa temporary exhibition which is visible at the museum until October 2, 2022. It was inspired and derived from The twenty years wara book that tells the stories of 71 service members who have served their country since 9/11. The book was launched at the National Veterans Memorial and Museum on the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

Its permanent exhibits tell equally compelling true stories of struggle, victory and everything in between. In fact, the heart of the museum is really its linear timeline which makes the storytelling all the more memorable. Throughout this timeline, visitors are taken on a journey through United States history, learning how personal stories have changed and have remained the same for those who serve over the years. Artifacts and images combine throughout the timeline to help bring stories to life.

Through personal stories, the permanent Legacy of Service exhibit shows how some veterans use the skills they learned and the talents they cultivated in the military to serve their communities when they return home.

Additionally, one important thing the Legacy of Service exhibit does is allow every visitor to become a more informed part of the conversation about how we can bridge the gap between veterans and civilians. In addition to providing an immersive educational experience, it offers resources and practical ways to get involved in finding solutions.

The museum remains current and celebrates holidays such as Pride Month. For June 2022, the museum shared how important it is to honor the contributions of LGBTQIA+ members and veterans, and offered a variety of resources to engage visitors. The museum also shared stories of the experiences of gay veterans over the years, including US Army veteran Gilbert Baker who created the first rainbow flag for the gay community.

When visiting the museum, be prepared to spend a lot of time in the latter part of the experience. As you ascend to the Memorial Gallery, prepare to be amazed by the colorful stained glass windows inspired by military campaign ribbons. The heart of this area, however, is the exhibit honoring the millions who died in service to the United States.

The National Veterans Memorial and Museum is located in downtown Columbus, Ohio.

]]> The Aviation Museum names the summer camp after the Eastern KY pilot. https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-aviation-museum-names-the-summer-camp-after-the-eastern-ky-pilot/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-aviation-museum-names-the-summer-camp-after-the-eastern-ky-pilot/ For some, flying is a hobby. For Lincoln Kilgore, it’s a way of life. Kilgore, a Kentucky native, was honored at the last Aviation Summer Camp held at Kentucky’s nonprofit Lexington Aviation Museum for his contributions to camp and the museum. While in the aviation program at Eastern Kentucky University, he worked as an instructor […]]]>

For some, flying is a hobby. For Lincoln Kilgore, it’s a way of life.

Kilgore, a Kentucky native, was honored at the last Aviation Summer Camp held at Kentucky’s nonprofit Lexington Aviation Museum for his contributions to camp and the museum.

While in the aviation program at Eastern Kentucky University, he worked as an instructor for the camp each summer. After graduating from EKU in 2021, Kilgore enrolled in the Officer Candidate School and graduated in December.

Now, the Lawrence County native is stationed at Naval Base Pensacola, Florida, but returned to Bluegrass to visit the camp where he developed his love for flying.

The camp, a two-day introduction to aviation and piloting, is offered for several weeks each summer throughout Kentucky. Campers ages 10 to 17 learn to fly from professional instructors, and many bring a family member with an aviation background.

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Ensign Lincoln Kilgore talks to students in flight simulators during Aviation Summer Camp Friday, June 24, 2022 at the Museum of Aviation at Bluegrass Airport in Lexington, Kentucky. Michel Clubb mclubb@herald-leader.com

While working at the camp, Kilgore said his favorite activity was teaching a flight simulation course, which he said was “a blast”.

“On the flight simulation, we teach (kids) to fly from Lexington to Frankfort, Georgetown and back,” Kilgore said. “Watching young adults feel this love and pleasure…it’s wonderful. It means the world.

The camp has been in existence for 27 years, and each summer a two-day session is named for someone to commemorate their work for the museum. June 23-24 is Lexington’s last session for the summer, and it has been named “ENS Lincoln Kilgore Aviation Camp”.

Hunter Moore, the aviation museum’s director of operations, said Kilgore embodies the camp’s vision of teaching young people about aviation and educating future generations of pilots, which is the museum’s core mission. It was this dedication that inspired the museum to name a camp after it.

“He’s just an exceptional young man,” Moore said. “He is an ideal representative of the army.”

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Ensign Lincoln Kilgore US Navy

Museum board administrator Jerry Landreth said the camp provides an introduction to the many career options in aviation, such as administration and piloting, and many students have gone on to work in the domain.

Kilgore said he keeps in touch with the campers he taught at this museum, and at least 20 of them have gone on to aviation careers.

“There were a few students (who) messaged me and said, ‘Mr. Kilgore…you really helped me figure out, like, this is what I wanted to do with my life. And to me, that means everything,” he said.

Kilgore said he “choked up a bit” when told of plans to name a camp after him.

“It’s a huge honour. I love the museum, I love Kentucky, I love Kentucky Air Force,” he said. “It was the highlight of my young professional career.”

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The Wallace Museums make a pass https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-wallace-museums-make-a-pass/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 12:17:35 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-wallace-museums-make-a-pass/ WALLACE – With summer in full swing, it’s a great time to experience the local history that the towns scattered throughout the Silver Valley have to offer. All three nonprofit museums in the historic Wallace community, which include the Wallace District Mining Museum, the Barnard-Stockbridge Museum and the Northern Pacific Depot Museum, are now offering […]]]>


WALLACE – With summer in full swing, it’s a great time to experience the local history that the towns scattered throughout the Silver Valley have to offer.

All three nonprofit museums in the historic Wallace community, which include the Wallace District Mining Museum, the Barnard-Stockbridge Museum and the Northern Pacific Depot Museum, are now offering passes.

Tammy Copelan, who works for the Wallace District Mining Museum and the Barnard-Stockbridge Museum, came up with this idea about three years ago, but so far it hasn’t materialized.

“A lot of big cities offer passes for different attractions and it made sense for us to do that here as well.”

The goal of the Wallace District Mining Museum is to tell the story of the Coeur d’Alene mining district through written, graphic and three-dimensional objects and documents. The museum was founded in 1956 and offers visitors over 50 exhibits, over 5,000 photos and maps, and a unique mine simulation experience.

The Barnard-Stockbridge Museum website explains that this is a collection of large format photographs taken by Thomas Barnard and Nellie Stockbridge in their studio and community between 1893-1965. The original collection of over 200,000 photos has been housed in the Special Collections Unit of the University of Idaho Library. The photograph collection is considered the finest photographic collection in the Northwestern United States and one of the county’s top seven collections. Previously, the photos were published in a smaller format for viewing in local newspapers, but the museum has expanded their size, to better see the details of the photographs and better understand Nellie Stockbridge’s photographic ability. The museum is currently displaying an exhibition of “Ladies Up, Down”, which features portraits of local madams and sex workers from that era.

The Northern Pacific Depot Museum is dedicated to showing the rich history of the railroad in the Coeur d’Alene mining district and the depot itself. The museum takes you back to a time when railways were the primary means of transportation. The castle-style depot houses the museum and gift shop and is an excellent example of Wallace’s unique and historic architecture. Additionally, the museum features a replica of a working railroad agent’s bedroom, where you can talk on a real 1908 telephone.

Local businesses that want to help can sponsor the museum pass for a month.

“Fowl Mouths has sponsored next month and is offering 10% off everything for those who have the pass. We have previously been sponsored by Cogs Gastro Pub and Muchacos Tacos,” Coplan said.

The museum pass can be purchased at any of the three museums and is usable for 24 hours. The cost is $10 for individuals and $20 for families.

The Wallace District Mining Museum is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and is located at 509 Bank Street. For more information, visit www.wallaceminingmuseum.com.

The Barnard-Stockbridge Museum is located at 312 Fourth St. and will be open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.barnardstockbridge.com.

The Northern Pacific Depot Station is open daily from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is located at 219 Sixth St. For more information, visit npdepot.org.

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Military Museum and Pritzker Library Name Three Veterans https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/military-museum-and-pritzker-library-name-three-veterans/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:26:52 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/military-museum-and-pritzker-library-name-three-veterans/ Chicago, Ill., June 22, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CHICAGO – June 22, 2022 – The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is proud to announce the recipients of the 2022 Citizen Soldier Award: Lt. Col. Enoch Woodhouse, Col. Jack Jacobs and Gen. Ann Dunwoody. The awards will be presented at the Liberty 2022 “Honoring Strength Through […]]]>

Chicago, Ill., June 22, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — CHICAGO – June 22, 2022 – The Pritzker Military Museum & Library is proud to announce the recipients of the 2022 Citizen Soldier Award: Lt. Col. Enoch Woodhouse, Col. Jack Jacobs and Gen. Ann Dunwoody. The awards will be presented at the Liberty 2022 “Honoring Strength Through Diversity” Gala on Saturday, November 5 at the Hilton Chicago hotel.

The Citizen Soldier Award is intended to honor a person who exemplifies the traditions of the citizen soldier established by George Washington, a person who has served the nation as a leader in war and in peace, for the betterment of the common good . The recipient must have served in the U.S. Armed Forces, Active, Guards, or Reserves, and is active or honorably discharged. The honoree must also display a commitment to non-partisan issues and demonstrate an ability to bridge political divides. Recipients of the Citizen Soldier Award are selected by a committee of Pritzker Military Museum & Library Board members and non-Board volunteers and Col. (IL) Jennifer N. Pritzker, IL ARNG ( retired), president and founder of the Museum and the Library.

“The Museum and Library is proud to present our highest honor at the 2022 Freedom Gala to three exemplary individuals who embody the meaning of the citizen soldier,” said Pritzker Military Museum and Library founder Col. (IL) Jennifer N. Pritzker, IL ARNG. (Retired). “The kind of sacrifices, commitment and accomplishments of each of our honorees speaks to the importance of both service and advocating for the greater good of our country. It is truly an honor for us to celebrate and recognize such deserving individuals.

Lieutenant Colonel Enoch Woodhouse enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1944. He then served as a finance officer for the Tuskegee Airmen from 1946 to 1948. After military desegregation in 1948, he continued to serve in reserve for the new Army of the Air Force in 1949. His Army service earned him numerous awards, including the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. Congress on individuals or institutions for outstanding achievement and contribution. He and other Tuskegee Airmen received the President George W. Bush Medal in 2006.

Colonel Jack Jacobs entered military service in 1966 as an ROTC second lieutenant assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division and deployed to Vietnam as a military adviser. During a mission in the Mekong Delta, his battalion came under enemy fire. Wounded in the head and arms, Jack took command of the battered unit, mounting a defense and repeatedly breaking through heavy fire to save wounded soldiers and recover weapons, single-handedly scattering enemy squads, killing at least three enemy soldiers. Jack’s gallant actions and extraordinary heroism saved the lives of an American adviser and 13 Allied soldiers. For his service in Vietnam, Jack added two Silver Stars, three Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts to his list of decorations.

General Ann Dunwoody was the first woman to command a battalion in the 82nd Airborne Division in 1992. Ann became Fort Bragg’s first female general officer in 2000 and the first woman to command the Combined Arms Support Command at Fort Lee, Virginia. In 2005, she became the highest ranked woman in the Army when she was promoted to lieutenant general as Deputy Army Chief of Staff, G-4 (Logistics). In November 2008, General Dunwoody became the first woman in military history to achieve the rank of four-star general. As commanding general of the U.S. Army Materiel Command, one of the Army’s largest commands, Ann served with distinction. Throughout his career, General Dunwoody remained a strong supporter of decreasing sexual assault within the United States military.

“Lieutenant. Colonel Woodhouse, Colonel Jacobs and General Dunwoody are extraordinary examples of what it means to be a citizen soldier,” said Susan Rifkin, acting president of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library. “Col. Jacobs bravely acted to save his comrade in arms. LTC Woodhouse played a pivotal role in the early integration of the United States Armed Forces. GEN Dunwoody’s ability to cross gender barriers, as the first four-star general in the U.S. Army, has created progress for all female service members. The achievements of our honorees are a testament to their tremendous leadership, strength, and diversity.”

The 2022 Liberty Gala, to be held Saturday, November 5 at the Hilton Chicago hotel, will celebrate the work of the Pritzker Military Museum & Library and honor the achievements and service of citizen soldiers of the United States Armed Forces, past and present. This year’s theme is “Honoring Strength Through Diversity”.

For more information about the Liberty Gala or to learn more about the Citizen Soldier Award nominees, please visit the website at PritzkerMilitary.org.

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About the Pritzker Military Museum and Library

The Pritzker Military Museum & Library aims to increase the public’s understanding of military history, military affairs and national security by providing a forum for the study and exploration of our military – past, present and future – with special emphasis on their stories, sacrifices and values. With national and global reach, these spaces and events aim to share the stories of those who served and their contributions as citizen soldiers, helping citizens around the world appreciate the relationship between the armed forces and the civilians they protect. freedoms. A non-governmental and non-partisan organization, the Museum & Library showcases a variety of collections, scholarly initiatives and public programs, from its flagship center in downtown Chicago to its world-class research facility and park currently under construction in Somers, NY. Wisconsin.

  • 2022 Citizen Soldier Award Winners

        
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Getting ready for National Selfie Day at the Photoverse Selfie Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/getting-ready-for-national-selfie-day-at-the-photoverse-selfie-museum/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:45:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/getting-ready-for-national-selfie-day-at-the-photoverse-selfie-museum/ MILWAUKEE – I find it interesting that due to social media and smartphones, selfies have become a thing. So much so that it is said that 92 million selfies are taken daily. According to the Internet story of National Selfie Day: The word “Selfie” was coined in 2002. However, it gained popularity in 2013 after […]]]>

MILWAUKEE – I find it interesting that due to social media and smartphones, selfies have become a thing. So much so that it is said that 92 million selfies are taken daily.

According to the Internet story of National Selfie Day: The word “Selfie” was coined in 2002. However, it gained popularity in 2013 after the Oxford English Dictionary named it the word of the year. . In 2014, DJ Rick McNeely established June 21 as National Selfie Day.

It seems that there are several types of selfies; Mirror selfies, group selfies and filtered selfies, to name a few.

I’m not good at taking selfies, but since practicing self-portraiture is part of the way we live life these days, I met Maddox Phillips, a selfie expert/youngster at the Photoverse Selfie Museum , to learn the tricks of taking the perfect selfie.

“First, you need to know how to use your phone,” Maddox said. He suggested holding the phone high and setting the timer so you have enough time to strike the perfect pose. he also showed me how to use the camera on the back of the phone using the volume button as a shutter. Even though I learned a lot, my selfies weren’t great, but I had a lot of fun.

Tuesday is National Selfie Day and the Photoverse Selfie Museum in 3rd Street Market Hall will be offering FREE admission. Put your selfie skills to the test and share them with me.

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Beth Lipman Featured in Wichita Art Museum’s Summer Exhibit https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/beth-lipman-featured-in-wichita-art-museums-summer-exhibit/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 07:43:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/beth-lipman-featured-in-wichita-art-museums-summer-exhibit/ Table set (Still life with metal pitcher) by Beth Lipman. To celebrate the installation of the commissioned piece Living History, the Wichita Art Museum has hosted a mid-career survey of Lipman’s work, which will be on display June 25 through September 25. 25. John R. Glembin Courtesy of Milwaukee Museum of Art A chance trip […]]]>

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Table set (Still life with metal pitcher) by Beth Lipman. To celebrate the installation of the commissioned piece Living History, the Wichita Art Museum has hosted a mid-career survey of Lipman’s work, which will be on display June 25 through September 25. 25.

Courtesy of Milwaukee Museum of Art

A chance trip through the Flint Hills of Kansas left Wisconsin artist Beth Lipman “breathless” and inspired to capture the unique prairie landscape in a commissioned piece for the Wichita Art Museum.

The resulting suspended sculpture, weighing over 1.5 tonnes, now captures the attention of visitors as they enter the WAM lobby. Lit up at night and visible through the glass-encased lobby, the sculpture made of shimmering clear glass, wood, ceramic and metal also catches the eye of passers-by on Museum Boulevard.

To celebrate the installation of the commissioned piece titled Living History and other works created by Lipman over the years, WAM has organized what is called a mid-career survey of Lipman’s work. The summer exhibit, “Beth Lipman: All in Time,” opens June 25. In addition to being able to visit the museum on a free admission day, WAM has also planned complementary activities and artistic creation from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the opening day.

Before stepping down from her 10-year term as director of WAM earlier this month, Patricia McDonnell spoke about how important it was for the museum to have a piece commissioned by Lipman.

“It’s a site-specific work by an artist who is a major national art star, and it was part of the museum’s strategic plan to have a hanging sculpture to enliven our lobby. “said McDonnell, calling the installation the highlight of his decade with the museum. “I am thrilled with this sculpture.”

Lipman has created commissioned pieces for the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Arkansas and the Chrysler Museum of Art in Virginia and is working on one for the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio. In addition to winning a Smithsonian Fellowship, she was also featured in the PBS documentary “Craft in America.”

While Lipman has used glass and other materials to create elaborate still lifes since 1996, the exhibition will feature more than a dozen pieces she has made since 2010, making it a rather mid-career survey. only a retrospective of his work dating back to the beginning.

She recently had a similar investigation exhibited at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, and several of the pieces from that exhibit will be on view at WAM, Lipman said in a phone interview about a week before her scheduled return to Wichita. to set up the exhibit. She had traveled to Wichita in April to oversee the installation of Living History.

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Artist Beth Lipman is helping install her new large-scale public sculpture, Living History, at the entrance to the Wichita Art Museum this week. The sculpture was made specifically for the Wichita Museum of Art and references the history, ecology and culture of Wichita and surrounding areas. It recreates plants, grasses, and rock formations found in the nearby Flint Hills. Living History also nods to iconic artworks from the museum’s collection, including the barber poles from WAM’s Americana Collection and the vertical forms of artist Louise Nevelson’s Night Sun III sculpture. Lipman has works in the collections of the Brooklyn Museum, the Corning Museum of Glass, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum Travis Heying The Wichita Eagle

Originally, Lipman had planned to fly to Wichita in August 2020 to visit WAM staff about her commissioned piece, but due to the pandemic, she instead drove from her home base of Sheboygan. , Wisconsin, where the Pennsylvania native and Temple University alum has lived for the past 15 years.

The reader ended up being a major inspiration.

“The landscape really impressed me. I was a little out of breath when I arrived at the Wichita Art Museum. I was delirious. I didn’t know much about the Flint Hills. It became apparent with the history of Flint Hills as an uncultivated landscape that this was important and aligned with my work.

In addition to incorporating at least five different types of grass found in the Flint Hills and Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, the undercarriage, or kind of platform, on which the Living History still life was created is based on scans of a rock formation in Dead Man’s Gulch in northeast Gerry County. During one of the exhibit’s opening day activities on June 25, staff from the local Great Plains Nature Center will talk about the different grasses found in the Flint Hills.

Lipman was also influenced by her time in Wichita in August 2020. Her jogs around Veterans Memorial Park in downtown Wichita led her to incorporate a bell she spotted into one of the memorials and helmets of soldiers. WAM’s Pulse Field sculpture display at its main entrance – featuring 119 individual rods with solar-powered fixtures – is also referenced in Living History.

“There are a lot of different layers of things that aren’t hugely obvious when you look at them, but they’re all built into the scope of the work that cascades through the tall grass and above Living History,” Lipman says.

“If you took Living History away from the Wichita Art Museum, it wouldn’t make much sense. It might be interesting to watch but in terms of dialogue, if it was in Seattle, for example, it wouldn’t make sense.

Lipman said she was drawn to glass work when she had the chance to work with the medium at summer camp. At the Tyler School of Art and Architecture in Temple, she majored in fiber and glass.

“Beth Lipman: All in Time” will be on view at WAM until September 25. Opening day activities on June 25 include artistic creation, live music by Pop and the Boys, food trucks and a 2 p.m. screening of films made about Lipman. Museum guides will also be available from 1 to 3 p.m. to talk about the Living History-commissioned sculpture and the exhibit.

Exhibition “Beth Lipman: Everything in time”

When: June 25-Sept. 25; special opening day activities from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday

Where: Wichita Museum of Art, 1400 W. Museum Blvd.

Admission: $10 for adults, $5 for ages 60 and up, $3 for ages 5-17 and students with ID, and free for ages 5 and under and WAM members. Free admission for all ages on Saturday. WAM also participates in the Sunflower Summer program, where Kansas families with children from kindergarten through seniors can visit an attraction for free by downloading the app.

More information: 316-268-4921 or wichitaartmuseum.org

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‘The Color Factory’ Interactive Art Museum Just Opened in Downtown Chicago – NBC Chicago https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-color-factory-interactive-art-museum-just-opened-in-downtown-chicago-nbc-chicago/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:36:58 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-color-factory-interactive-art-museum-just-opened-in-downtown-chicago-nbc-chicago/ Chicago is a city known for its museums, such as the Art Institute, Field Museum, Museum of Science and Industry, and many more. Now he adds one with a mint green 200.00 ball pit to that list. The Color Factory, inside the Willis Tower at 233 S. Wacker Dr. is a 25,000 square foot interactive […]]]>

Chicago is a city known for its museums, such as the Art Institute, Field Museum, Museum of Science and Industry, and many more.

Now he adds one with a mint green 200.00 ball pit to that list.

The Color Factory, inside the Willis Tower at 233 S. Wacker Dr. is a 25,000 square foot interactive art museum that “invites visitors to experience the joy of color through multi-sensory installations, immersive rooms” and more, according to a Liberation press.

The permanent museum contains everything from a maze of colors to a “deconstructed movie theater”, interactive and immersive art installations that mix color and sound, and of course, a very large green ball pit.

According to the release, the museum worked with local artists Akilah Townsend and Edra Soto to create a 36-color palette used throughout the museum, inspired by elements and neighborhoods of Chicago, such as the red of Calder’s Flamingo in the Loop and the green of an original Rainbow Cone.

The museum opens on Friday. Here’s what you need to know to get going:

Hours: Tuesday – Sunday, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Tickets: $38 for general admission$28 for children under 12

Masks are recommended but not required.

The Color Factory also operates museums in Houston and New York. According to the statement, the Chicago museum is the largest outpost.

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Join MTSU at the City’s June 19 Celebration at the Bradley Academy Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/join-mtsu-at-the-citys-june-19-celebration-at-the-bradley-academy-museum/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 00:24:36 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/join-mtsu-at-the-citys-june-19-celebration-at-the-bradley-academy-museum/ Murfreesboro, Tennessee—MTSU will help Murfreesboro and Rutherford County score June 19 in a special way, Friends of the Media: by offering community neighbors a chance to preserve and share their family’s stories in a wonderful new effort, the Middle Tennessee African American Oral History Project. This one-year initiative, funded under a new to agree of […]]]>

Murfreesboro, Tennessee—MTSU will help Murfreesboro and Rutherford County score June 19 in a special way, Friends of the Media: by offering community neighbors a chance to preserve and share their family’s stories in a wonderful new effort, the Middle Tennessee African American Oral History Project.

This one-year initiative, funded under a new to agree of the national endowment for the humanities shared between our liberal arts college, aims to “preserve family genealogy, record her relationship with her family, with her community and with the times in which she lives”, according to Jason McGowan of our Albert Gore Research Center.

McGowan is coordinating the project and will be on site Saturday June 18, toBradley Academy Museum and Cultural Center for Murfreesboro’s June 19 celebration to answer questions, distribute information and put guests at ease while he helps organize the taping of their stories.

More details about the oral history project are included in the story below. You can also upload several images to accompany it at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/upw8x29fawj4y4x/AACB8Gc7Necdk1-zBdsTJqCNa?dl=0.(As always, cut line information is embedded in each image and included below.)

We hope you’ll let your audience know about this opportunity to preserve their stories next Saturday with the Middle Tennessee African American Oral History Project so they can join us, and we hope you can join in the celebration on June 19 in Murfreesboro too!

If you would like to talk more about the project with Mr. McGowan, let me know and I can help you organize it. you can also reach him directly via the contact information at the end of the story.

Thank you for all you do for MTSU and the community, and have a great weekend!

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