Museum – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 17:12:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png Museum – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Museum of Black Hockey History – NBC4 Washington https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/museum-of-black-hockey-history-nbc4-washington/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 17:05:59 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/museum-of-black-hockey-history-nbc4-washington/ The mobile museum of NHL black hockey history celebrating the sport’s African-American pioneers and current stars has arrived in the DC area for the weekend. The visit is free. The traveling museum is in Rockville on Friday and is expected to arrive in Reston on Saturday. The NHL’s Black Hockey History Mobile Museum celebrates the […]]]>

The mobile museum of NHL black hockey history celebrating the sport’s African-American pioneers and current stars has arrived in the DC area for the weekend. The visit is free.

The traveling museum is in Rockville on Friday and is expected to arrive in Reston on Saturday.

The NHL’s Black Hockey History Mobile Museum celebrates the sport’s African-American pioneers and current stars. News4’s Juliana Valencia takes you inside.

Exhibit teaches visitors about early hockey, including early Canadian star Herb Carnegie and the NHL’s first black player, Willie O’Ree, and highlights local history and Capitals highlights from Washington.

“Hockey is for everyone,” said Rodney Reynolds, founder of the American Legacy Network Corp. who helped organize the museum. “Anyone who joins us will learn a lot about the success of black people in the sport of hockey.”

Here’s when and where to find it:

  • Friday January 21, 2022: Rockville Ice Arena, 3 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Saturday January 22, 2022: SkateQuest Reston, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

More things to do in Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia this weekend

Cleaning the Arlington National Cemetery Garland: Wreaths Across America has placed thousands of wreaths to honor service members for the holiday, and now it’s time to clean them up. The event begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday and entry is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Alexandria Restaurant Week: The catering offers event starts on Friday and more than 60 restaurants are participating. Many places have heated outdoor seating or offer take-out deals. It runs until January 30.

ARTECHOUSE New Exhibition: The interactive digital art museum turns music into visual art in its new exhibit, “Transient: Impermanent Paintings.” It runs until March 6. Adult tickets start at $24; discounts are available.

Beethoven exhibition: The Kennedy Center celebrates Ludwig van Beethoven with the National Symphony Orchestra performing his symphonies and a public art exhibit by Mo Willems titled Beethoven Symphonies Abstracted. It’s free and until March 20.

The Home + Remodeling Show can help you unleash your creativity. The event returns to the Dulles Expo Center after a two-year hiatus.

Reception + renovation lounge: Have you looked at your kitchen or home office, hoping you’ll be struck by some design inspiration? the Reception + renovation lounge kicking off Friday at the Dulles Expo Center can help get your creativity flowing. Tickets are $9 for adults if purchased online. Here is an overview.

Washington Auto Show: One of the biggest auto shows in the country is back. It runs until next Sunday; adult weekend tickets start at $15.

Correction: An earlier version of this article misspelled Mo Willems’ name.

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Pier 24 Photography Museum in San Francisco promotes Allie Haeusslein to director https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/pier-24-photography-museum-in-san-francisco-promotes-allie-haeusslein-to-director/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 18:22:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/pier-24-photography-museum-in-san-francisco-promotes-allie-haeusslein-to-director/ SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Photograph of Pier 24 announces the promotion of Allie Haeusslein to director, who will now work in tandem with director Christopher McCall. Haeusslein has been Associate Director since 2012. During his ten-year tenure, Haeusslein oversaw the museum’s internal publishing program, producing more than ten books, including Photographers looking at photographs: 75 images from […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Photograph of Pier 24 announces the promotion of Allie Haeusslein to director, who will now work in tandem with director Christopher McCall. Haeusslein has been Associate Director since 2012.

During his ten-year tenure, Haeusslein oversaw the museum’s internal publishing program, producing more than ten books, including Photographers looking at photographs: 75 images from the Pilara Foundation (2019), in which she invited artists from the Pilara Foundation Collection to write about works they selected from the collection.

After having been co-curator of previous exhibitions, she was the principal curator of Looking back (2019-22), the first of the institution’s tenth anniversary exhibitions; she is also responsible for the second of these anniversary exhibits—Looking forward— scheduled to open in the spring of 2022.

“She is an integral part of every aspect of our operations, from day-to-day management to exhibition planning. Pier 24 Photography wouldn’t be what it is today without her,” said McCall.

“I am honored to have played a role in the development and trajectory of Pier 24 during its formative years,” said Haeusslein. “I am grateful to Andy and Mary Pilara and Christopher McCall for their support and this recognition. I look forward to continuing to make the voice of photographers heard through our future exhibitions and publications.

Haeusslein holds a BA in International Studies from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and an MA in Contemporary Art from Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London. She was born and raised in San Francisco.

PIER 24 PHOTOGRAPHY

Located on San Francisco’s Embarcadero, Pier 24 Photography is one of the largest spaces in the world dedicated to exhibiting photography. Since its opening to the public in 2010, Pier 24 Photography has offered a place to discover and quietly contemplate photography. Pier 24 Photography is home to the Pilara Foundation’s permanent photography collection, which includes more than five thousand works by more than 350 photographers. For more information, visit pier24.org.

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Recreation centre, proposed museum where the former separate Bastrop school was located https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/recreation-centre-proposed-museum-where-the-former-separate-bastrop-school-was-located/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 01:09:33 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/recreation-centre-proposed-museum-where-the-former-separate-bastrop-school-was-located/ A non-profit organization in Bastrop is working to transform a slice of the city’s history that once represented segregation into one that symbolizes unity. The Emile Multicultural Center/Recreation Complex, a newly created non-profit organization, plans to build the city’s first recreation center. The organization was established in August 2021 with a mission to honor the […]]]>

A non-profit organization in Bastrop is working to transform a slice of the city’s history that once represented segregation into one that symbolizes unity.

The Emile Multicultural Center/Recreation Complex, a newly created non-profit organization, plans to build the city’s first recreation center. The organization was established in August 2021 with a mission to honor the area’s historic roots — specifically, the legacy of the former Lycée Emile, a segregated school for black students that closed in 1969.

The municipal council unanimously approved a letter of intent on Tuesday signifying its agreement to collaborate with Emile for the construction of the leisure center. The letter, noted City Manager Paul Hofmann, is not binding but acts as “a hugely important statement of the city’s intentions to bring this partnership to fruition.”

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A bizarre little Vegas museum showcases lost and forgotten artifacts https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-bizarre-little-vegas-museum-showcases-lost-and-forgotten-artifacts/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 04:58:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-bizarre-little-vegas-museum-showcases-lost-and-forgotten-artifacts/ LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — Walk into the Office of Collecting and Design in Las Vegas and you’ll find drawers labeled as “metal bits” and “teeth.” All had to be opened up and explored. As Jessica Oreck describes it, space is a “collection of collections”. As curator of the strange little museum, Oreck draws on her […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — Walk into the Office of Collecting and Design in Las Vegas and you’ll find drawers labeled as “metal bits” and “teeth.”

All had to be opened up and explored.

As Jessica Oreck describes it, space is a “collection of collections”.

As curator of the strange little museum, Oreck draws on her background as a filmmaker, animator and artist to present lost and forgotten objects in a way that makes them charming and precious, and that are part of a larger story.

Things you will find in the “Collection of Collections”

“[The museum is] devoted to the diminutive, the scrap, the handmade, the obsolete,” Oreck said. “It’s full of unusual collections like dice you can’t play or incomplete decks of playing cards, empty matchboxes, broken animals.”

On a wall in the reading room, missing doll shoes are displayed near a set of small empty picture frames and tiny teaspoons.

Amy Abdelsayed, 13 Action News

“That little collection of spoons was kind of a mistake,” she explained. “My whole family, for some reason, thought my husband collected tiny spoons, and so for every holiday – for years – they would give him a tiny spoon as a gift.”

On the same wall is a collection of hawk’s feet.

“I lived in Germany for four years and worked as an apprentice falconer. Every time the goshawk killed a bird, I kept one of its legs.”

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Amy Abdelsayed, 13 Action News

There are also hands. Eight molds of human hands, each with their own unique gesture, decorate a nearby shelf.

“I like this one in particular,” she said, lifting the rightmost one, “because it has the real fingerprints of anybody’s hand.”

Several of the collections are quirky and not something you’re likely to see anywhere else. Others are just as ordinary, like the pot filled with marbles or the assortment of buttons.

“When you arrange them together, they just have endless charm,” Oreck said. “For me at least.”

How it all began

Oreck has been collecting objects for decades.

“My parents told me I gathered before I could walk,” she said. “I was always putting together little collections of things. I really think it’s a trait. It’s an innate gene that I have and I can’t escape it.”

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Amy Abdelsayed, 13 Action News

As a child, she received an object that would eventually represent her first collection at the Office of Collecting and Design.

“When I was 12, my aunt gave me dice that had belonged to my great-grandmother,” she says. “And that’s what really kicked things off.”

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Amy Abdelsayed, 13 Action News

As an adult, Oreck says he enjoys hunting. You won’t find anything in the museum bought online, she only buys in person. Often from the penny jar at flea markets.

“These are the things that nobody wants, nobody really feels like they can charge for them, but they don’t want to just throw them away.”

Everything has a “past life”

Oreck likes to find treasures while traveling, which she does a lot. Especially as a filmmaker.

She lived in Finland, Russia, Japan, Germany, South Korea.

“I guess I did a little stint in Argentina,” she adds to the list. And then another, “Mexico”.

His “foreign gum” collection occupies two drawers.

“This one’s my favorite,” she said as she pulled out a pack of red chewing gum that says “Spout” and “splash your mouth with coolness” in bubbly white letters.

She thinks it’s from Qatar. There are so many packets of gum that I don’t know how she keeps track.

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Amy Abdelsayed, 13 Action News

Visiting the museum is a hands-on experience. Guests are encouraged to open the drawers, play with them, and touch the items.

“Everything here just has a past life and those lives are tied to everyone, you know, that comes through here,” she said.

“I think it’s a very powerful form of nostalgia, to be able to deal with something that you don’t remember until you see it again and hold it in your hands,” she continued. “And it’s a really special experience to be able to share that with people.”

Before leaving, she will probably ask you to sign the guestbook. It is, after all, his collection of visitors to the museum of collections.

How to get there

The museum is free to enjoy.

Walk-ins are welcome on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

You need an appointment most days. To make an appointment officeofcollecting.com, email nominations@officeofcollecting.com, call (725) 226-8355 or direct message them on Instagram at @office.of.collecting.

You can find the Office of Collecting and Design inside New Orleans Square near Sahara Avenue and Maryland Parkway at 900 Karen Avenue in suite B-105.

Do you know an artist who should be in the “Las Vegas Art Scene” or do you have an upcoming art experience in the Las Vegas area to share? Email amy.abdelsayed@ktnv.com or DM her on Instagram @amyabdel.

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Protesters from Kazakhstan entered the main museum in search of ancient armor https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/protesters-from-kazakhstan-entered-the-main-museum-in-search-of-ancient-armor/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 16:43:43 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/protesters-from-kazakhstan-entered-the-main-museum-in-search-of-ancient-armor/ About 200 protesters descended on one of Kazakhstan’s top museums in Almaty, the former capital, as widespread protests swept the country last week. According to Kazakh media, the group ordered staff, who had stayed behind to guard the museum, to direct them to ancient armour. The protests, which were sparked by discontent over fuel prices, […]]]>

About 200 protesters descended on one of Kazakhstan’s top museums in Almaty, the former capital, as widespread protests swept the country last week. According to Kazakh media, the group ordered staff, who had stayed behind to guard the museum, to direct them to ancient armour.

The protests, which were sparked by discontent over fuel prices, were put down by police when they turned violent with support from several former Soviet countries led by Russia.

The Kazakh Ministry of Culture said in a statement posted on its website that it was “analyzing the damage to culture, archives, sports and tourism sites”.

The statement continued: “In Almaty, the Central State Museum of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the National Library of the Republic of Kazakhstan were attacked by terrorists.” According to the statement, the display cases and the entrance area were damaged, the doors were broken, but the archives remained intact. “Thanks to the courage of the employees, the looting of the main property of these objects has been avoided,” he said.

The museum is one of the most important in Central Asia, known for its collection of gold objects, Scythian bronze and ancient weapons. An intricate replica of the ‘Golden Man’, also known as the ‘Golden Warrior’ or ‘Tutankhamun of Kazakhstan’, discovered in 1969 at a burial site near Almaty, is a centerpiece of the museum.

The Golden Man in the Central State Museum of the Republic of Kazakhstan

Bibigul Dandygarayeva, the museum’s deputy director of management and marketing, told Tengrinews.kz and Russian news agency RIA Novosti that protesters came to the museum after staff housed injured police officers and young cadets attacked at the height of protests. She said she asked the staff to hide the military in the basement.

The museum is located near the municipal administration and the presidential residence.

Some analysts have suggested the street clashes have been fueled by a power struggle between Kazakh elites who have allegedly amassed huge fortunes through widespread corruption. Nursultan Nazarbayev, an autocratic ruler of Kazakhstan for nearly three decades, was removed from office by his hand-picked successor, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev.

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Glazer Children’s Museum and Tampa Bay Rays announce Big League Fun traveling exhibit https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/glazer-childrens-museum-and-tampa-bay-rays-announce-big-league-fun-traveling-exhibit/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 21:18:25 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/glazer-childrens-museum-and-tampa-bay-rays-announce-big-league-fun-traveling-exhibit/ TAMPA, FL – (January 12, 2022) – The Glazer Children’s Museum is teaming up with the Tampa Bay Rays to present Big League Fun, a traveling exhibit that will immerse visitors in the exciting world of baseball. The 2,000-square-foot hands-on experience, in part funded by the Rays Baseball Foundation, will feature fun activities, simulated play […]]]>

TAMPA, FL – (January 12, 2022) – The Glazer Children’s Museum is teaming up with the Tampa Bay Rays to present Big League Fun, a traveling exhibit that will immerse visitors in the exciting world of baseball. The 2,000-square-foot hands-on experience, in part funded by the Rays Baseball Foundation, will feature fun activities, simulated play experiences and challenges that promote educational concepts important to children and engage fans of all ages. From spring training to the World Series, explore the ins and outs of the baseball season.

“Visiting the Glazer Children’s Museum and cheering on the Tampa Bay stingrays are two well-loved traditions for Tampa Bay families.” said Sarah Cole, President and CEO of the Glazer Children’s Museum. “We’re excited to partner with The Rays, giving families a new way to bond around their love of the game and celebrate their pride in Tampa.”

Exhibition activities will focus on the science and math behind the sport, reflect national academic standards for school-aged children, and support development milestones set by the National Association for Early Childhood Education. .

“We are very excited about this partnership with the Children’s Museum,” said Rays President Brian Auld. “The Big League Fun exhibit is a wonderful opportunity to strengthen the love of baseball among children and families in Central Florida using the power of play and science.”

Test your skills! Get tips for throwing, throwing, lining up, hitting and running on bases correctly. Head to the bullpen and launch into the strike zone; perfect your swing and get on the plate; go, run to the second or return to the bag; throw from the infield or outfield with simulated games; and take a glove to catch the practice.

Explore the world of professional baseball. Take your photo in front of a special backdrop and personalize your team logo, player name and uniform using the graphic design station. In the clubhouse, check the schedule, roster, batting order and statistics; explore the history of the game; and learn about the diverse backgrounds of MLB players. Pretend to be the announcer and deliver play-by-play using real game clips and sound effects. Learn about the teams that make up Major League Baseball, the vocabulary and rules, and how to calculate the stats.

There is nothing like the stadium experience! Listen to the radio broadcasts, fill out your scorecard, and prepare for pre-game activities. Then head to the arches of the stadium and listen to the stadium come to life! Catch All-Star info, nonsense and more on the scoreboard, then join the crowd for round seven. Answer trivial questions, calculate batting averages, and solve physics-themed challenges. Recreate the stadium experience with props, costumes, and fun math and literacy activities at ticket sales and concessions.

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El Monte US Military Museum helps preserve history for future generations https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/el-monte-us-military-museum-helps-preserve-history-for-future-generations/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 01:13:40 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/el-monte-us-military-museum-helps-preserve-history-for-future-generations/ EL MONTE (KABC) – The pandemic has also made life difficult for local museums. And on top of that, the US Military Museum at El Monte has also recently had to deal with a fire. Craig Michelson’s father, a World War II officer, established the museum almost 60 years ago. It now has more than […]]]>
EL MONTE (KABC) – The pandemic has also made life difficult for local museums. And on top of that, the US Military Museum at El Monte has also recently had to deal with a fire.

Craig Michelson’s father, a World War II officer, established the museum almost 60 years ago. It now has more than 180 screens. From military helicopters to rare buses and a comprehensive collection of WWII tanks.

“A lot of veterans will come by, they’ll bring their kids, they’ll have their grandchildren, and they’ll say ‘oh I served on that tank, that was the truck I drove’, and that reminds me a lot. of memories, ”Michelson said.

That’s why Craig breathes a big sigh of relief – last week he lost almost everything … when a fire broke out on the neighboring property. He thanks the firefighters for saving him from grief.

“There was absolutely no damage,” Michelson said. “I love LA County. They stepped up their efforts and did a great job.”

Tight call after already difficult year, closed due to COVID; now the museum is open again on Saturdays and Sundays. The support has been enormous which keeps the museum going.

“Because once you’ve lost the story, that’s it!” Michelson said.

Copyright © 2022 KABC Television, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Not your typical neighborhood party: the latest exhibition from the Children’s Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/not-your-typical-neighborhood-party-the-latest-exhibition-from-the-childrens-museum/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 04:58:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/not-your-typical-neighborhood-party-the-latest-exhibition-from-the-childrens-museum/ Activity stations filled with plastic boxes and props scatter the latest exhibit at the Omaha Children’s Museum. Block Party is designed to introduce the concepts of math and game-based problem solving. Simply put, it’s fun! It is a hands-on experience to develop dexterity and similar skills for young children. “Without the kids even realizing it, […]]]>

Activity stations filled with plastic boxes and props scatter the latest exhibit at the Omaha Children’s Museum. Block Party is designed to introduce the concepts of math and game-based problem solving. Simply put, it’s fun! It is a hands-on experience to develop dexterity and similar skills for young children. “Without the kids even realizing it, they’re just having fun playing, but they’re developing all kinds of math and engineering skills,” said Marketing Director Kim Reiner. An earthquake table tests the durability of the structure. Museum educators plan to run programs that further develop skills. Since Block Party is a hands-on exhibit, the museum encourages all guests aged 2 and over to wear masks. The installed UV lamps disinfect surfaces and a ventilation system circulates and purifies the air. The Block Party is open until May 1st. Tickets are available at the door and online. day Free for members and children under 2 Hours Tuesday – Friday 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturday – Sunday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Activity stations filled with plastic boxes and props scatter the latest exhibit at the Omaha Children’s Museum.

Block Party is designed to introduce math and problem-solving concepts through play.

Simply put, it’s fun!

It is a hands-on experience to develop dexterity and similar skills for young children.

“Without the kids even realizing it, they’re just having fun playing, but they’re developing all kinds of math and engineering skills,” said Marketing Director Kim Reiner.

A seismic table tests the durability of the structure. Museum educators plan to run programs that further develop skills.

Since Block Party is an interactive exhibit, the museum encourages all visitors aged 2 and over to wear masks. The installed UV lamps sanitize the surfaces and a ventilation system circulates and purifies the air.

The Block Party is open until May 1st.

Tickets are available at the door and in line.

Entrance fee

$ 14 for adults and children

$ 13 for seniors

$ 5 the last hour of the day

Free for members and children under 2 years old

Hours

Tuesday to Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Saturday – Sunday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.


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Eat Houston: Mo ‘Better Brews in the Museum District https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/eat-houston-mo-better-brews-in-the-museum-district/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/eat-houston-mo-better-brews-in-the-museum-district/ The brightly lit interior of Mo ‘Better Brews | Photo: Justin Jerkins / 365Houston Immerse yourself in records, cafes and a 100% vegan brunch menu at Mo ‘Better Brews in the Museum Quarter. In a city teeming with barbecue grills, burgers, and virtually every other global cuisine, Houston’s offerings for vegan diets have traditionally lagged […]]]>

The brightly lit interior of Mo ‘Better Brews | Photo: Justin Jerkins / 365Houston

Immerse yourself in records, cafes and a 100% vegan brunch menu at Mo ‘Better Brews in the Museum Quarter.

In a city teeming with barbecue grills, burgers, and virtually every other global cuisine, Houston’s offerings for vegan diets have traditionally lagged behind when it comes to the restaurant scene.

But over the past decade, the landscape has widened, and the husband-and-wife duo of Courtney and Chasitie Lindsay are helping broaden the city’s culinary horizons with their latest vegan effort, Mo ‘Better Brews in the Museum District.

Open the weekend of June 17, 2021, the black-owned cafe and brunch is the couple’s first brick-and-mortar restaurant, and follows on from their previous vegan ventures that include Houston Sauce Co., the Sauce Co. Shoppette. on Wayside Drive, and The Green Zone on Almeda, which hosts their food trailers, Houston Sauce Kitchen, and Trill Phillies, among other vegan vendors.

But as the sign says, it’s more than vegan food as Mo ‘Better offers a special coffee blend from Three Keys Coffee (locally run by Tio and Kenzel Fallen), and a music selection curated by the eminent ethnomusicologist and resident DJ of Houston. , Flash Gordon Parks.

Those three rhythms combined, Mo ‘Better Brews achieves a great spot for cozy indoor and outdoor digs with a stellar brunch menu that packs the patio on weekends.

Vegan fried dishes and other dishes

Hot Honey Shrooms & Grits at Mo ‘Better Brews | Courtesy of Mo ‘Better Brews

Mo ‘Better Brews’ menu is 100% vegan and offers an array of fried, gravy and smothered dishes from light to heavy. Whichever direction you head in, the menu is packed with items that offer the types of first bite that stay in your mouth for a few extra beats, filling it with flavor and mumbled “mmm”.

Get started with Naked Fried Brussels; a bowl of delicate and ultra crispy sprouts in a tasty fig demi-glace, light with a fork and rich in flavor.

Then take your pick from featured items like the Johnny Nash Sweet Potato Hash with Kale, Quinoa, Black Beans, and Avocado in a Cilantro-Lemon Vinaigrette; the Chik’n Fried Shrooms & Grits with fried oyster mushrooms nestled in a bed of oatmeal and drizzled with Trill sauce; a Dilla Donut Sandwich that combines breakfast sausages, eggs, tomatoes, spinach and cheddar cheese in a fresh, fried donut; or dip into the sweet and mouthwatering waffles and pancakes topped with peach cobbler, strawberry cheezecake, pecan pie or warm honeyed Chik’n Fried mushrooms.

Flatbread pizzas and other light bites and kids ‘offerings round out the menu, but don’t skip Mo’ Better drinks, from locally roasted coffee drinks to juices, smoothies and mimosas kissed by aromas like the elderberry, hibiscus and pineapple.

Dig crates and sit on the patio

The Mo ‘Better Brews Two-Tier Outdoor Patio | Courtesy of Mo ‘Better Brews

From the bright, wood-lined interior and leafy outdoor patio that stretches out to the edge of San Jacinto Street, there are a handful of nooks where visitors can carve out space.

With doors open at 7:30 am six days a week, Mo ‘Better Brews positions itself as a cozy place to spend time with work, friends or colleagues on quieter mornings and weekday afternoons.

And, if you want to bring home some vinyl, head over to the ‘Wrecka Stow’ and flip through a few bins of records selected by Flash Gordon Parks, where you’ll find selections of soul, funk, hip-hop, and talent-grown talent. Houston. A unique addition to the cafe and brunch vibe, you’ll find insightful DJ notes that teach you about samples featured in other songs, special drum breaks, and obscure connections to H-Town.

If you’re dropping in for weekend brunch, plan ahead as the patio is packed and guests are limited to two hours per table. Large groups (6-15 guests) are encouraged to email and deposit with 48 hours notice, while small groups can get on the waitlist through Yelp.

To learn more about Mo ‘Better Brews, check their website where you can view the menu and place take out orders online.

Mo ‘Better Brews in the Museum Quarter

Mo ‘Better Brews, located at San Jacinto and Southmore Blvd. | Photo: Justin Jerkins / 365Houston


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Princeton Historical Society reopens Updike Farmstead Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/princeton-historical-society-reopens-updike-farmstead-museum/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 08:44:26 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/princeton-historical-society-reopens-updike-farmstead-museum/ BACK TO BUSINESS: Now that Quaker Road has reopened, visitors are once again invited to explore the Updike Farmstead Museum at the Princeton Historical Society, inside and out. By Anne Levin After an extended shutdown due to the pandemic and the closure of Quaker Road, the Historical Society of Princeton (HSP) has reopened its museum […]]]>

BACK TO BUSINESS: Now that Quaker Road has reopened, visitors are once again invited to explore the Updike Farmstead Museum at the Princeton Historical Society, inside and out.

By Anne Levin

After an extended shutdown due to the pandemic and the closure of Quaker Road, the Historical Society of Princeton (HSP) has reopened its museum at Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road. The causeway, closed since last September due to damage from the remains of Hurricane Ida, reopened on December 22.

During the closure, the museum kept the programs running through digital media and virtual events.

“We were so happy that we were able to stay engaged with history learners of all ages throughout the pandemic through social media, digital exhibits, digital tours, virtual lectures and workshops, and so much more. . I am very proud of how we were able to innovate during this difficult time and how we have always been able to inspire community members with stories from the past, ”said Executive Director Izzy Kasdin. “But nothing beats being immersed in the timeless beauty of historic landscapes and being in front of real historical materials, such as Albert Einstein’s pipe or an evocative photograph. We look forward to welcoming visitors back to Updike Farmstead and hope this is just the start of their historic journey through all that Princeton has to offer.

Einstein is at the center of the museum’s permanent exhibition, the Einstein Salon and the Innovators’ Gallery. To celebrate the reopening, all visitors this month will receive a free Albert Einstein t-shirt, subject to availability.

Other exhibits inside the museum include “Princeton’s Portrait,” which features early photographs of the area’s agricultural history. Works by painter / educator Rex Goreleigh, artists from Team A in Trenton and the Princeton Photography Club are also on display.

Outdoors, visitors can explore the Farmstead History Trail, which tells the stories of the Native Americans, Quakers, and family farmers who inhabited the area, and the Garden State History Garden, a multimedia interpretation of New Jersey’s farming past.

Updike Farmstead was once part of a 1,200 acre parcel purchased by Benjamin Clarke in 1696 to create the Quaker Colony at Stony Brook. Listed on the State and National Register of Historic Places, the property stands along the route followed by Continental troops en route to enlist British soldiers at the nearby Thomas Clarke Farm on January 3, 1777, in what would become the Battle of Princeton.

A private, non-profit organization, the Historical Society moved in 2014 to Updike Farmstead from Bainbridge House on Nassau Street, where it had been located since 1967. The six-acre farm was purchased from the Stanley Updike estate in 2004.

Upcoming activities sponsored by the Historical Society include walking tours on January 9, 16, 23 and 30; and an MLK Day Community Event on January 17th.

The museum’s opening hours are Thursday to Sunday, 12 noon to 4 p.m. admission is $ 4 per person. At present, the wearing of a mask is compulsory for all guests, regardless of their vaccination status. Visit princetonhistory.org for more information.


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