Historical monument – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:39:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png Historical monument – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Week-long photo exhibition held in Charminar to commemorate the monument’s 444 years https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/week-long-photo-exhibition-held-in-charminar-to-commemorate-the-monuments-444-years/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:02:13 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/week-long-photo-exhibition-held-in-charminar-to-commemorate-the-monuments-444-years/ Photo: PTI Hyderabad: To mark 444 years of Charminar according to the Islamic Hijri calendar, a seven-day photo exhibition was held at the historic site. The exhibition will be open to the public until August 7 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. In the exhibition held on the ground floor of the monument, visitors can […]]]>

Photo: PTI

Hyderabad: To mark 444 years of Charminar according to the Islamic Hijri calendar, a seven-day photo exhibition was held at the historic site. The exhibition will be open to the public until August 7 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

In the exhibition held on the ground floor of the monument, visitors can see photographs, maps and sketches revealing the history of Charminar through the centuries.

The event was jointly organized by Deccan Archive and Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH).

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According to the Hijri calendar, 1/1/1000, the first Muharrum of the year 1000 is when Charminar was first opened to the public. According to the same calendar, the historic monument celebrated its 444th anniversary on Sunday July 31.

Amidst the ambiguity surrounding the date of the laying of the first stone and the opening of the monument to public visitation, two dates are taken into account – July 31, according to the Hijri calendar, and October 9, 1591 according to the Georgian calendar.

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Beginning of the restoration of the Sasanian arch bridge https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/beginning-of-the-restoration-of-the-sasanian-arch-bridge/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 15:32:59 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/beginning-of-the-restoration-of-the-sasanian-arch-bridge/ TEHRAN – The ruined monument was once an important arch bridge during the Sasanian era, around 1,700 years ago. But over the years, the mud-brick bridge, located near the modern city of Dezful in southwestern Iran, has fallen into disrepair. Now, after several rounds of restoration, parts of the bridge, including the roadway and piers, […]]]>

TEHRAN – The ruined monument was once an important arch bridge during the Sasanian era, around 1,700 years ago.

But over the years, the mud-brick bridge, located near the modern city of Dezful in southwestern Iran, has fallen into disrepair.

Now, after several rounds of restoration, parts of the bridge, including the roadway and piers, will be reinforced and secured, Dezful’s tourism chief said on Saturday.

Better known as the Dezful Bridge, the massive monument over the River Dez is believed to be the oldest surviving bridge in the world and it remained in full functionality until recently.

The historic bridge has been extensively repaired and renovated at different times to ensure its functionality and preservation. Nowadays, cars are no longer allowed to pass over the structure due to its historical value and fragility.

The monument is said to have been built by Roman prisoners of war after suffering defeat at the hands of the Sasanian king Shapur I the Great, who ruled Persia from around 240-270 CE.

The Sassanid era is of very great importance in the history of Iran. Under the Sassanids, Persian architecture and arts experienced a general renaissance. The architecture has often taken on grand proportions, such as the palaces of Ctesiphon, Firuzabad and Sarvestan, which are among the highlights of the ensemble.

Generally, a Sasanian archaeological landscape represents a very effective system of land use and strategic use of natural topography in the creation of the first cultural centers of the Sasanian civilization.

In 2018, a collection of historic Sasanian cities in southern Iran, titled “Sasanian Archaeological Landscape of the Fars Region”, was named a UNESCO site. The ensemble comprises eight archaeological sites located in three geographical parts of Firuzabad, Bishapur and Sarvestan.

World Heritage reflects the optimized use of natural topography and bears witness to the influence of Achaemenid and Parthian cultural traditions and Roman art, which later had a significant impact on the architecture and artistic styles of the era. Islamic.

Besides architecture, crafts such as metalworking and gemstone engraving became very sophisticated, but the state encouraged scholarship. During these years, works from East and West were translated into Pahlavi, the language of the Sassanids.

AFM

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Off Course Stage 7: Villages Fleuries https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/off-course-stage-7-villages-fleuries/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 02:38:03 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/off-course-stage-7-villages-fleuries/ Mountains and more mountains on the penultimate stage of the Women’s Tour de France, but also pretty little towns in bloom. And a castle. Just after the start, the runners pass in front of the magnificent Château du Haut-Koeningsbourg. The first castle was built here as a fortress watching over the plains in the 12e […]]]>

Mountains and more mountains on the penultimate stage of the Women’s Tour de France, but also pretty little towns in bloom. And a castle.

Just after the start, the runners pass in front of the magnificent Château du Haut-Koeningsbourg. The first castle was built here as a fortress watching over the plains in the 12e century. The first mention of the fortress dates back to 1157 when it was named Koeningsburg, or royal castle in early German.

The fortification works carried out during the 15th century were not enough to keep the Swedish artillery at bay during the Thirty Years’ War (more on this in step 8). The defenses of Hohkoenigsbourg are exceeded. Besieged, looted and then finally burnt down in 1633, the castle was abandoned for two hundred years.

Its ruins were listed as a historic monument in 1862. There were ambitious plans to restore it but funds were limited as this part of France changed between France and Germany often over the century to follow. The German Emperor Wilhelm II saw it as a symbol of German greatness and just before the First World War, when the region was German, he had it restored. It was done by scientific precision to really correspond to a medieval fortress, unlike, for example, Carcassonne which was more of a romantic interpretation of the past.

Many villages today are on the list of Villes et Villages Fleuries. Ville Fleurie is the official quality label of the National Competition for Towns and Villages in Bloom. There is a sign attached to the place name when you enter a village with one to four flowers.

The competition has grown in popularity over the past forty years. What was unthinkable in the 1970s is today a national event in France. People are enthusiastic about improving the green living environment of their village or town. Schools participate actively, especially in villages and small towns.

The report of the Sélestat city departure jury – 3 flowers – is as follows: The flowering plant palette is diversified and the choice of plantations is relevant. Wefts of colors offer harmonious blends. The local government carries out particularly careful maintenance throughout the year. The presence of perennial and native plants increases each year in order to act for the preservation of natural resources.

And that’s only a third of it. This is serious business. One last unusual fact. Sélestat has the honor of the city of France where we find the first mention of the Christmas tree in 1521.

One last cheese tasting for this year of Hors Course. We pass Munster about 35 kilometers from the finish line. Munster is the giver of the name of a particularly smelly cheese. Think: open the fridge, then pass out, that kind of smelly.

Around the year 660, monks belonging to the obedience of Saint-Benoît settled in the valley of Munster. They named their monastery after Saint Gregory: The Abbey of Saint-Grégoire de Munster. Its monks were perhaps the first makers of this soft, round cheese, of which more than eight million kilos are produced each year. The name Munster comes from monasterium, the Latin word for monastery. The smell is as strong as its smell. I warned you.

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Russia steps up strikes on Ukraine amid counterattacks https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/russia-steps-up-strikes-on-ukraine-amid-counterattacks/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 12:26:38 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/russia-steps-up-strikes-on-ukraine-amid-counterattacks/ Comment this story Comment KYIV, Ukraine – Russian forces on Thursday launched massive missile strikes on Ukraine’s Kyiv and Chernihiv regions, areas that had not been targeted for weeks, while Ukrainian officials announced an operation to liberate an occupied region in the south of the country. Kyiv Regional Governor Oleksiy Kuleba said on Telegram that […]]]>

Comment

KYIV, Ukraine – Russian forces on Thursday launched massive missile strikes on Ukraine’s Kyiv and Chernihiv regions, areas that had not been targeted for weeks, while Ukrainian officials announced an operation to liberate an occupied region in the south of the country.

Kyiv Regional Governor Oleksiy Kuleba said on Telegram that a settlement in the region’s Vyshgorod district was targeted early Thursday morning; an “infrastructure object” has been hit. It was not immediately clear if there were any casualties.

Vyshhgorod is located 20 kilometers (about 12 miles) north of downtown Kyiv. Kuleba linked the strikes to Statehood Day, which Ukraine marked for the first time on Thursday.

“Russia, with the help of missiles, is ramping up in revenge for the widespread popular resistance, which the Ukrainians were able to organize precisely because of their statehood,” Kuleba told Ukrainian television. “Ukraine has already violated Russia’s plans and will continue to defend itself.”

Chernihiv Governor Vyacheslav Chaus reported that several missiles were fired from the territory of Belarus at the village of Honcharivska.

Russian troops withdrew from Kyiv and Chernihiv regions months ago after failing to capture either. The resumption of strikes comes a day after the leader of pro-Kremlin separatists in the east, Denis Pushilin, publicly urged Russian forces to “liberate Russian cities founded by the Russian people – Kyiv, Chernihiv, Poltava, Odessa, Dnipropetrovsk, Kharkiv, Zaporizhzhia, Lutsk.

Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second-largest city, was also shelled overnight, its mayor Ihor Terekhov said. The southern town of Mykolaiv also came under fire, and one person was injured.

Meanwhile, the Ukrainian army continued to counterattack in the occupied southern region of Kherson, striking a key bridge over the Dnieper on Wednesday.

Ukrainian media quoted Ukrainian presidential adviser Oleksiy Arestovich as saying on Thursday that the operation to liberate Kherson “has already begun”. Arestovich said Kyiv forces planned to isolate Russian troops there and leave them three options: “retreat, if possible, surrender or be destroyed.”

Oleksiy Danilov, secretary of Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council, said in a televised address on Wednesday that he was “cautious” in assessing the timing of a possible counteroffensive. “I really wish it was much faster,” he said, adding that “the enemy is now concentrating the maximum number (of forces) precisely in the direction of Kherson.”

“A very large-scale movement of their troops has begun, they are gathering additional forces,” Danilov warned.

The British army estimated Thursday that the counter-offensive of Ukraine in Kherson “is gaining momentum”.

“Their forces have most likely established a bridgehead south of the Ingulets River, which forms the northern border of Russian-occupied Kherson,” Britain’s Ministry of Defense said on Thursday.

He added that Ukraine used its new long-range artillery to damage at least three of the bridges over the Dnieper, “which Russia relies on to supply areas under its control.” The 1,000-metre-long Antonivsky Bridge, which Ukrainian forces hit on Wednesday, is likely to be “unusable”, the UK Ministry of Defense has concluded.

Ukraine’s presidential office said Thursday morning that Russian shelling of towns and villages over the past 24 hours had killed at least five civilians, all in the eastern region of Donetsk, and injured nine others.

Fighting in recent weeks has been concentrated in the Donetsk region. It has intensified in recent days as Russian forces appeared to be emerging from a reported “operational pause” after capturing the nearby Luhansk region.

A missile hit a residential building in Toretsk early Thursday morning, destroying two floors. “Once again the terror of the missiles. We will not give up… We will not be intimidated,” Donetsk regional governor Pavlo Kyrylenko said on Telegram.

Analysts from the Institute for the Study of War believe that Russian forces are focusing their efforts on capturing the towns of Bakhmut and Siversk in Donetsk province.

“Russian forces committed sufficient resources to conduct near-daily ground assaults and seize territory on these two axes, but were unable to maintain a similar offensive operational tempo or achieve similar territorial gains elsewhere. in Ukraine,” the institute said.

President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, who instituted Statehood Day last year to remind Ukrainians of the country’s statehood history, said as he was marked for the first time that the event had acquired a new meaning.

“The state in which the story of invincibility began, which all of Europe and the whole world admires, is our state. Our country. This is Ukraine,” Zelenskyy said Thursday.

The commemoration – which is not a public holiday – honors Prince Vladimir, who made Christianity the official religion of Kyiv Rus’ more than 1,000 years ago.

The Kremlin also lays claim to the historical heritage of Kyivan Rus. In 2016, Russian President Vladimir Putin erected a monument to Prince Vladimir near the Kremlin.

Follow AP coverage of the Russian-Ukrainian War at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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These key projects would improve the quality of life in York County https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/these-key-projects-would-improve-the-quality-of-life-in-york-county/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 19:05:13 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/these-key-projects-would-improve-the-quality-of-life-in-york-county/ Fifty years from now, how will historians view the early 2020s in York County? This issue is there in the light of growth and reform from past conflicts: the Civil War, World War I, the Spanish flu and the York race riots of 1968-69. York County residents did not let these deadly and painful crises […]]]>
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Man raises funds to complete Des Moines streetcar monument https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/man-raises-funds-to-complete-des-moines-streetcar-monument/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 03:00:20 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/man-raises-funds-to-complete-des-moines-streetcar-monument/ DES MOINES, Iowa – Before cars and interstate highways ruled Des Moines, the streetcar system ruled the roads. While the cars themselves are long gone, a man leads an effort to preserve a piece of the train tracks. The Waveland Trolley Loop will transform the loop once used to bypass streetcars on University Avenue into […]]]>

DES MOINES, Iowa – Before cars and interstate highways ruled Des Moines, the streetcar system ruled the roads. While the cars themselves are long gone, a man leads an effort to preserve a piece of the train tracks.

The Waveland Trolley Loop will transform the loop once used to bypass streetcars on University Avenue into a monument to Des Moines streetcar history. Earl Short and his group, Des Moines Streetcar Friends, led the memorial effort.

“Growing up, it was the only means of transportation we had. We didn’t have a car, so it was the tram,
said short. “That loop was the end of the line. This loop is there, and I think, ‘we have to keep this and keep the history of it.’

Short and his group have so far raised nearly $300,000 for the tram loop. Construction progressed, but Short said inflation was starting to take its toll on the project.

“The cost of everything has gone up,” said Short, who said he has worked since 2016 to build the monument. “It will continue to increase even before we can finish it.”

Short raised money for the project at a fundraiser at the Des Moines Heritage Center on Sunday afternoon, and continues to solicit donations online at this website.

“It’s important for people to find out and find out that almost every part of the city was built on the streetcar lines,” said David Barzen, president of the Des Moines Historical Society.

According to the Des Moines Public Library, electric streetcars began operating in Des Moines in 1888. The last streetcar using tracks ran in 1951, although a cart with automobile tires called a “curbliner” continued to operate. operate until 1964.

While Des Moines’ roads are now owned by cars and DART buses, Short hopes streetcars can one day return to service.

“It’s cheap transportation,” Short said. “In today’s world with rising gas prices, it would be a dream to have a streetcar line here.”

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Richmond brought down its Confederate statues. But not everyone left. https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/richmond-brought-down-its-confederate-statues-but-not-everyone-left/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 11:48:54 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/richmond-brought-down-its-confederate-statues-but-not-everyone-left/ Comment this story Comment RICHMOND — The scars where Confederate statues once stood along Monument Avenue are now covered in sidewalks or landscaping, and social justice protests have largely died down. But just across town, a statue of rebel General AP Hill still dominates one of Richmond’s busiest intersections. Outside the State Capitol, whose chambers […]]]>

Comment

RICHMOND — The scars where Confederate statues once stood along Monument Avenue are now covered in sidewalks or landscaping, and social justice protests have largely died down. But just across town, a statue of rebel General AP Hill still dominates one of Richmond’s busiest intersections.

Outside the State Capitol, whose chambers were emptied of Confederate iconography one night in 2020, General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson still stands in bronze atop a stone pedestal.

To his left, along Capitol Square: a statue of Hunter Holmes McGuire, the Confederate doctor who amputated Jackson’s arm and was a lifelong advocate of slavery. To Jackson’s right: William “Extra Billy” Smith, who served as governor before and after serving as a Confederate general.

Richmond has drawn international attention for its efforts to confront the legacy of slavery and the Civil War, with some of its toppled icons now reinterpreted in museums or hidden away in warehouses. But the work of clearing public spaces of the symbols of a “lost cause” remains unfinished two years after the fall of the first monument.

The remaining numbers testify to the depth of Confederate heritage in the Richmond landscape, lingering despite the widespread feeling that they should go. The topic surfaced again this month when Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R), who took office in January, appointed a historian defending the statues to the State Board of Historic Resources.

The council — which primarily handles historic landmark designations and oversees historic markers — played no role in the removal of Confederate statues. But Ann Hunter McLean’s nomination has raised questions about Youngkin’s intentions to change course from his predecessor, Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam, who led efforts to remove Confederate memorials from land owned by the State.

When asked if Youngkin would seek to remove the remaining statues or restore those that were taken down from inside the Capitol, spokeswoman Macaulay Porter replied in a written statement that “he strongly believes that we do not must not airbrush our history. The Governor believes we should not ignore or excuse the sins of our past, but we should resist the movement to clean up our history.

Porter added that “the decisions to remove the statues were decisions made by previous administrations and politicians. Today, the governor focuses on inflation, education, and rising crime in Virginia.

State Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-Richmond), who heads the General Assembly’s Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Commission, said removing racist statues “is not whitewashing history.” We teach history in school…but what we choose to commemorate in public spaces must reflect the public’s values.

The fact that many are staying in prominent places is a measure of the work that hasn’t been done, she said. “Progress takes time, and Virginia in general and Richmond in particular have had a lot of [memorials] … There was pretty deep-rooted support among the old guard white power structure and it just took this long to get over that.

Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney ordered a dozen Confederate memorials removed from city property in the summer of 2020, but Hill’s statue was a special case: it’s the only one standing above the mortal remains of his subject.

Hill was killed outside Petersburg in the closing days of the Civil War. His body was first buried in Chesterfield County, then dug up two years later and moved to Richmond Hollywood Cemetery. Finally, in 1891—with a large new statue of Robert E. Lee unveiled on what would become Monument Avenue—Hill was moved a third time to a memorial just north of town anchoring a suburban housing estate.

Perspective: Richmond tore down its statues – and revealed a new angle on the story

Today, the intersection of Laburnum Avenue and Hermitage Road has a reputation as one of the most dangerous in Richmond, as traffic circles around the tall gray Statue Hill obstacle. Early last year, the city approved a plan to remove him, subject to consulting with his family to move the body.

City officials worked for months to identify and contact Hill’s indirect descendants – he had four daughters but no grandchildren – and in May this year asked a Circuit Court judge to approve a new burial. The city paid $1,000 for land at Fairview Cemetery in Culpeper, Hill’s hometown, and lined up a funeral home to handle the move.

The statue is believed to go to the Richmond Black History Museum, which oversees efforts to reuse all of the city’s toppled Civil War monuments. Most of the statues are stored under tight security in a water treatment facility, although the paint-splattered figure of Confederate President Jefferson Davis is on display off to the side at the Valentine Museum – the studio home where the likeness was created by sculptor Edward Valentin.

Monroe Harris, president of the Black History Museum, said several more pieces are set to be loaned for exhibition later this year at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.

But on July 1, a separate group claiming descent from the Hill family filed an objection to the city’s plan for that statue. Represented by attorney S. Braxton Puryear, who has also been involved in court battles to save Confederate statues in Charlottesville, the group agrees with the city’s reburial effort but not with the handing over of the figure at the Museum.

Arguing that the site is a cemetery, Puryear’s court filing refers to the monument as a “headstone” and asserts that the city has no authority under state law to dispose of it. The statue is the “personal property” of the descendants, the filing states, and they “seek to be removed and moved to a place of dignity and discretion as a cenotaph for AP Hill.”

Puryear did not respond to a request for comment.

The City of Richmond filed a response Wednesday, denying that Puryear’s patrons can claim the statue and denying “that the intersection of Laburnum Avenue and Hermitage Road…is a cemetery.”

No hearing has yet been scheduled in this case. Stoney’s office declined to comment, but the city retained Team Henry – the same contractor who removed all other Confederate memorials around Richmond – and said in court papers the monument could be removed in less 10 days once the court gives the green light. .

Residents hoped the end would come soon. The Hermitage Road Historic District Association passed a resolution in June 2020 calling for the intersection to be cleared “promptly”. We understand that the reburial process may take longer, so we ask that the statue itself be removed as soon as possible. »

In Capitol Square, the three Confederate statues survived even when the General Assembly voted last year to eliminate another figure in the square: Harry Flood Byrd, the former governor and U.S. senator who led the movement for massive resistance against school integration.

The old Del. Jay Jones (D-Norfolk), who sponsored Byrd’s bill, said he had hoped to include the Jackson, McGuire and Smith statues as well, but aides told him their jurisdiction was unclear. “I understand there is a patchwork system of which entities are responsible for which statues” in Capitol Square, Jones said.

Of the. Eileen Filler-Corn (D-Fairfax), who served as House Speaker during the Democratic majority in the 2020 and 2021 sessions, ordered Confederate statues and busts removed from House-controlled areas inside of the Capitol in 2020. Workers carried them out in the middle of the night for safety reasons.

Filler-Corn said she determined she had no authority over the statues outside the building, which most likely belonged to the governor. “People asked about these other statues and I knew I didn’t have the power or the skill to remove them,” she said.

Clark Mercer, who as Northam’s chief of staff was instrumental in removing the giant statue of Lee from state property on Monument Avenue, said he believed the governor and the legislature reportedly moved to remove the trio from Capitol Square. And after a nearly 18-month legal battle over Lee that ended in the state Supreme Court, Mercer said the Northam administration essentially ran out of time.

“Lee was our primary focus because it was the largest and most imposing monument to the lost cause in the world,” Mercer said. He noted that Northam removed language from an arch honoring Confederate President Jefferson Davis at Fort Monroe in Hampton in 2019 – a year before social justice protests that led to the downfall of others – and quietly laid the groundwork. to remove Lee shortly after taking office in 2018.

“Maybe we ran out of time, but we also had to prioritize,” he said.

Mercer and McClellan both suggested that while Jackson’s statue remains in its place for the time being, new signage could help put it in its historical context. Unlike the Hill memorial and those on Monument Avenue, all of which were built during the Jim Crow era, the Jackson figure in Capitol Square was commissioned while the Civil War was still ongoing.

A group of Jackson admirers in Britain funded the piece after the general’s death in 1863, but plans to ship it to Virginia were halted when the war ended. Confederate veterans helped revive the effort several years later; at that time, reconstruction was in full swing. Ten black members of the House of Delegates joined three white Republican colleagues in voting against spending state money to receive the statue, according to researchers at the Library of Virginia. They lost.

When the memorial was unveiled in front of thousands of onlookers in 1875, plans called for members of the black militia to join the honorary procession, but Confederate General Jubal Early stopped him. The presence of black troops would be “an indignity to Jackson’s memory and an insult to all Confederates who attend the dedication of the statue,” Early wrote to organizers, according to the Library of Virginia.

On a recent weekday, a small group of Segway tourists pulled up outside the Capitol to take a look at the row of statues. Grace and Michael Contopoulos and their two children, visiting from Westchester, NY, knew the memorials had come down Monument Avenue and were surprised to see them still standing.

“I would rather they weren’t here, personally,” said Michael, 44.

Son Miles, 15, was more blunt: “For all I care, bronze could be melted down and put in cars.”

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Taj Mahal Highlights – KVIA https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/taj-mahal-highlights-kvia/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 19:28:08 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/taj-mahal-highlights-kvia/ CNN Editorial Research Here is some general information about the Taj Mahal, India’s most popular tourist attraction. The monument is located on the banks of the Yamuna River in Agra, India. Facts The Taj Mahal was built in the 17th century by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in honor of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who […]]]>

CNN Editorial Research

Here is some general information about the Taj Mahal, India’s most popular tourist attraction. The monument is located on the banks of the Yamuna River in Agra, India.

Facts

The Taj Mahal was built in the 17th century by Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan in honor of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died in childbirth.

“Taj Mahal” means “crown of palace” in Urdu and Persian.

In fiscal 2020, nearly 1.26 million people visited the Taj Mahal, according to statistics from India’s Ministry of Tourism.

The site is maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India, which has organized multi-year clean-up projects to restore discolored areas on the facade of the Taj Mahal caused by air pollution and insect excretions from the Yamuna River adjacent.

Architecture

The most recognizable feature of the Taj Mahal is the large white domed mausoleum, which is surrounded by four tall minarets at each corner. The exterior is in white marble.

The main building contains two cenotaphs commemorating Shah Jahan and Mumtaz Mahal. A cenotaph is a Greek word meaning “empty tomb”. The couple are actually buried in sarcophagi below.

The cenotaphs and the screen around them are covered with intricately designed mosaics made of semi-precious stones.

On either side of the Taj Mahal are two red sandstone buildings: a mosque and a meeting hall.

The grounds also include gardens and a long reflecting pool.

Chronology

1628 – Shah Jahan becomes emperor as part of the Mughal dynasty, ruling over northern India.

1631 – His wife, Mumtaz Mahal, dies during childbirth.

1632 – Construction of the Taj Mahal begins. It is estimated that around 20,000 workers helped build the structure.

1648 – The Taj Mahal’s main mausoleum is complete.

1653 – Additional elements including a mosque, guesthouse and courtyard are completed.

1666 – Shah Jahan dies and his remains are buried next to Mumtaz Mahal under the Taj Mahal complex.

1861 – The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) is founded to help preserve and restore India’s historic monuments and sites.

1899-1905 – Lord Curzon of Great Britain is the Viceroy of India. During his tenure, he ordered the restoration of certain historic sites, including the Taj Mahal.

1983 – UNESCO designates the Taj Mahal as a World Heritage Site.

July 7, 2007 – The Taj Mahal is named one of the “New Seven Wonders of the World”. as part of an online marketing campaign.

October 2017 The Taj Mahal is one of many sites excluded from a brochure issued by the Uttar Pradesh Department of Tourism. Referring to Yogi Adityanath, Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister’s explanation that the monument does not “reflect Indian culture”, Swapan Dasgupta, BJP member of India’s upper house of parliament, told CNN that any controversy had been exaggerated.

April 1, 2018 – A three-hour limit for visitors to the Taj Mahal is put in place.

May 9, 2018 – India’s Supreme Court orders ASI to do a better job with its restoration plan as the discoloration and stains on the exterior of the Taj Mahal have not been resolved as promised.

March 17, 2020 – The ASI orders the closure of all monuments and museums due to the threat of the coronavirus, including the Taj Mahal.

June 14, 2021 – ASI issues a statement that monuments and museums closed due to the coronavirus pandemic will reopen on June 16, with protective guidelines in place.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

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The war in Ukraine is the real culture war https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-war-in-ukraine-is-the-real-culture-war/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 04:29:20 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-war-in-ukraine-is-the-real-culture-war/ Between the sirens of air raids, amid updates from the front, push what saves. “I had the feeling in the early days, and even now, that there was sand in my mouth instead of words,” said Olena Stiazhkina, a famous novelist and historian, when we met to eat Crimean Tatars a few days after Kyiv’s […]]]>

Between the sirens of air raids, amid updates from the front, push what saves. “I had the feeling in the early days, and even now, that there was sand in my mouth instead of words,” said Olena Stiazhkina, a famous novelist and historian, when we met to eat Crimean Tatars a few days after Kyiv’s death. last bombardment. Ms Stiazhkina was born in Donetsk, the largest city in the Donbass, and fled when Russian-backed separatists fought for control in 2014. Her novels, like many conversations here before February, swing between Ukrainian and Russian – or they used to; she’s done with Russian for now.

She has friends who fled Kyiv, but she couldn’t bring herself to leave home, not a second time. When we met, she felt strong and sure of herself, but she wondered what might happen to her in a decade. She mentioned Primo Levi, Paul Celan, Jean Améry, writers who survived the Holocaust and then committed suicide years later, and her eyes lit up.

What drives it is this Ukrainian archival impulse. “As a witness, I can write. As a writer, I can’t,” she told me. “I understood that I had to be a witness, and that’s why I write a diary every day. And this time, I have every intention of finishing it on the day of our victory.

In 2014, after the Maidan revolution that overthrew former President Viktor Yanukovych, Ukraine experienced a national renaissance, at least in part. The political revolution trembled, but the cultural explosion continued, producing a new generation of young filmmakers, photographers, designers and, above all, DJs and electronic musicians.

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The reconstruction of the historic fort flouts the legal requirement https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-reconstruction-of-the-historic-fort-flouts-the-legal-requirement/ Sat, 16 Jul 2022 02:47:45 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-reconstruction-of-the-historic-fort-flouts-the-legal-requirement/ Ongoing reconstruction and excavation work at Bungnam Gadhi, a historic fort, in Okhaldhunga violates existing legal provision, archaeologists say. In clear violation of the Ancient Monuments Preservation Act 2013, the Province 1 Ministry of Tourism rebuilt the fort without coordination with the Department of Archaeology. The fort’s bunkers were dismantled while the old stone walls […]]]>

Ongoing reconstruction and excavation work at Bungnam Gadhi, a historic fort, in Okhaldhunga violates existing legal provision, archaeologists say.

In clear violation of the Ancient Monuments Preservation Act 2013, the Province 1 Ministry of Tourism rebuilt the fort without coordination with the Department of Archaeology. The fort’s bunkers were dismantled while the old stone walls were replaced with concrete walls as part of the reconstruction works.

“One should not rebuild such a historic fort without consulting the Department of Archaeology. The ministry is making a huge mistake,” said Bhogiraj Chamling, a PhD student researching Mundhum and Kirant’s story.

According to him, Bungnam Fort is around 400 to 700 years old and historically significant.

The fort spans two ropanis of land in Molung-1 Rural Municipality of Okhaldhunga District. During the current fiscal year, the provincial government has allocated Rs 5 million for the reconstruction of the monument. The reconstruction work, which began a few months ago with the formation of a consumer committee, should be completed during the current financial year which ends on July 16.

According to the laws in force, coordination with the Department of Archeology is essential for the reconstruction and excavation of historical monuments. However, the consumer committee carries out the work without coordination with the Department of Archaeology.

Dhan Bahadur Baniya, chairman of the consumer committee formed to rebuild the fort, said local people had asked the Department of Archeology to rebuild and preserve the monuments for years, but the department had not provided any support.

“We then asked the provincial government to rebuild the fort. Work on the fort has started with the budget provided by the provincial government in the current fiscal year,” Baniya said. According to him, the reconstruction work was carried out in accordance with the design and specifications prepared by the provincial government. He said he was not aware of the law relating to the reconstruction of historical monuments.

Meanwhile, the archeology department says it has not obtained any information regarding the reconstruction of the fort.

“In accordance with the Ancient Monuments Preservation Act 2013, the reconstruction of any historic monument must be carried out in coordination with the Department of Archaeology. The department has no information on the reconstruction of the fort. The work is therefore clearly against the law,” said Ram Bahadur Kunwar, spokesperson for the department.

Sub-Clause 4(1) of Clause 16 of the Preservation of Ancient Monuments Act 2013 states that a person shall be liable to a fine of up to Rs 25,000 or imprisonment five years or two if discovered excavating historical monuments without obtaining permission from the Department of Archaeology. . Similarly, sub-clause 5(2) states that a person shall be liable to a fine of up to Rs 15,000 or imprisonment for three years or both if the excavation works are carried out without informing the head of the district.

“The district administration office has also not been informed about the reconstruction and excavation of Bungnam Fort. We will look into the matter,” said Okhaldhunga District Chief Dil Kumar Tamang.

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