Historical monument – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 01:04:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png Historical monument – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 fort: “will not regularize constructions within 300 meters of Fort Sonar” | News from Jodhpur https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/fort-will-not-regularize-constructions-within-300-meters-of-fort-sonar-news-from-jodhpur/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 22:41:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/fort-will-not-regularize-constructions-within-300-meters-of-fort-sonar-news-from-jodhpur/ Jodhpur: Jaisalmer City Council filed in the Rajasthan High Court on Tuesday that the administration would not regularize any construction within 300 meters of the outskirts of Fort Sonar, a World Heritage Site.The divisional bench of Judge Sandeep Mehta and Judge Sameer Jain, during the previous hearing of a PIL proposed by resident Sunil Paliwal […]]]>
Jodhpur: Jaisalmer City Council filed in the Rajasthan High Court on Tuesday that the administration would not regularize any construction within 300 meters of the outskirts of Fort Sonar, a World Heritage Site.
The divisional bench of Judge Sandeep Mehta and Judge Sameer Jain, during the previous hearing of a PIL proposed by resident Sunil Paliwal in December, extended the stay of any proceedings relating to the issuance of pattas in protected areas, prohibited and regulated inside and around the fort.
Paliwal, through the petition, sought court intervention on the city council’s decision to issue pattas to 300 people living in and around the fort on the land falling within the protected area, the prohibited area as well as the restricted area of ​​the ancient monument under the jurisdiction of Archaeological Survey of India (ASI).
Calling the local body’s decision arbitrary and illegal, the petitioner argued that permissions to allocate freehold tenancy rights would lead to new construction and could damage the skyline, art , the architecture, the historical and artistic importance of the fort.
The petitioner’s lawyer, Manas Ranchhor Khatri, told the court that the city council had made a serious error of law in inviting applications for the grant of freehold/patta leasehold rights, as no permission could be granted if the land was within 200 meters of the boundary of a historical monument and places of archaeological significance, archaeological monuments, heritage areas and other restricted access areas.
“Now, since Sonar Fort is both a National Monument and a World Heritage Site, the local body has not only broken the rules, but also seriously compromised the condition of the monument, which is the most endangered of 6 hill forts in total. Rajasthan in the list,” Khatri said. Highlighting governments’ apathy over its heritage status, Khatri said that even after eight years of the monuments being inscribed on the World Heritage List, no management plan for the conservation and protection of the fort has not been submitted by the government despite several reminders by the World Heritage Committee.
“Without this plan, this magnificent but endangered fort risks losing its status as a World Heritage Site,” he said.
Also praying for the immediate development of heritage regulations for the fort, Khatri said the influx of tourists residing inside the monument’s hotels, guesthouses and restaurants has sparked commercial and unauthorized activities at the fort. inside the fort, thus causing damage due to water seepage into the bedrock of the sedimentary formation on which Fort Sonar is built.
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Conservationists rally against city plans for dog run near abolitionist site in downtown Brooklyn https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/conservationists-rally-against-city-plans-for-dog-run-near-abolitionist-site-in-downtown-brooklyn/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 22:50:28 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/conservationists-rally-against-city-plans-for-dog-run-near-abolitionist-site-in-downtown-brooklyn/ Activists have rallied against the city’s plan to install a dog park in a larger park atop a site that would have been part of Brooklyn’s downtown Underground Railroad. The city has begun building the long-delayed 1.15-acre green space known as Abolitionist Place on land at Willoughby and Duffield streets with a planned dog run […]]]>

Activists have rallied against the city’s plan to install a dog park in a larger park atop a site that would have been part of Brooklyn’s downtown Underground Railroad.

The city has begun building the long-delayed 1.15-acre green space known as Abolitionist Place on land at Willoughby and Duffield streets with a planned dog run next to 227 Duffield Street, a Town-owned historic row once owned by 19th-century slavery abolitionists Thomas and Harriet Lee Truesdell.

The small group of protesters gathered on Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and included the family of former occupants of the now dilapidated building and advocates of Brooklyn’s abolitionist history, and they handed out flyers on the project led by the city’s quasi-public Economic Development Corporation.

EDC’s plans include a text-based installation by artist Kameelah Janan Rasheed inspired by that legacy, but a local has lamented that officials refused to erect their planned monument dubbed ‘Sisters in Freedom’ to honor the five pioneering black women Ida B. Wells, Maritcha Lyons, Sarah Smith Garnet, Victoria Earle Matthews, and Dr. Susan Smith McKinney.

“The NYC Economic Development Corporation wants to erase history by rejecting what we proposed with the monument for these five women,” said Raul Rothblatt, who criticized the decision to put a local puppy playpen next door. of the “terrible” historical structure.

A rendering of Abolitionist Place with the dog enclosure in the top right.Hargreaves Jones/New York EDC

Rothblatt’s daughter, Charlotte’s Girl Scout Troop 2663, decided to write a petition encouraging members of the community to learn about the history beneath their feet.

“I want people to know more about the Sisters of Liberty and the Underground Railroad,” the 13-year-old said. “I think people would care more if they knew it existed.”

The Rothblatts were joined by Shawne Lee, daughter of the late Joy Chatel, a local figure who once lived at 227 Duffield, and Lee stressed the importance of keeping Truesdells history alive.

“They not only contributed to the liberation of their people, but also to the suffrage movement,” Lee said. “They didn’t shut down for speaking out about the injustices of their people, and they lived here in Brooklyn.”

Other participants in the rally said public ignorance of the significance of the land prevented the construction of the desired monument.

“I just know that even people walking around in this plaza right now don’t know this story,” said Devan Nelson, a rally attendee and a member of the historically integrated Black Delta Sigma Theta sorority. “If they knew it was an Underground Railroad stop, they wouldn’t let it happen. They just need to know.

Chatel, who died in 2014, believed that in addition to her home, 231 Duffield and 436 Gold Street were other locations connected to the Underground Railroad. When she was still alive, she showed the great tunnel under her house which could have been used to escape slavery.

Surrounded by a green construction fence, the unassuming lot is filled with gravel and debris, and Lee said his mother’s former home should become a museum for the area’s anti-slavery movement.

“My mother, when she was alive, always said she wanted to turn her house into a museum, so having that and the monument would be – in my opinion – a great investment for the city,” Lee said. “And what better way to celebrate these women and this history and the bravery of women of color who have truly fought against oppression?”

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Exclusive Interview: Author Rana Safvi on her latest book, the role of monuments in history, and more https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/exclusive-interview-author-rana-safvi-on-her-latest-book-the-role-of-monuments-in-history-and-more/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/exclusive-interview-author-rana-safvi-on-her-latest-book-the-role-of-monuments-in-history-and-more/ Author and translator Rana Safvi’s latest book titled “A Saint, a Folktale and Other Stories” was released in December 2021 and has been to critical acclaim ever since. Published by Rupa Publications, the book “takes the reader to secret and hidden parts of India beyond the usual tourist destinations”. It takes you back in time […]]]>
Author and translator Rana Safvi’s latest book titled “A Saint, a Folktale and Other Stories” was released in December 2021 and has been to critical acclaim ever since. Published by Rupa Publications, the book “takes the reader to secret and hidden parts of India beyond the usual tourist destinations”. It takes you back in time and on a journey to discover India’s vast architectural heritage.

The book’s blurb reads: “Discover the secrets that Khusrau Bagh hides in her heart, marvel at the forgotten resting place of a queen, hear folk tales and fables embedded in the structures, and walk through the poetic journey to some of the places where the great poets sleep, in the hope that the book will take the reader on a journey of its own.”

In a recent chat with TOI Books, Safvi spoke in detail about “A Saint, a Folktale and Other Stories”, the role of monuments in history, why some monuments are more popular than others, and more.

1. Your latest books largely focus on the city of Delhi, its history and its forgotten monuments. However, in your latest book “A Saint, a Folktale and Other Stories” you stray from Delhi and talk about India’s “lesser known” landmarks. Why the change?
I have described over 450 Delhi landmarks in my Delhi trilogy and although a few are still missing, I have covered almost all major Delhi landmarks. There is an urgent need to raise awareness about our built heritage and so I felt the need to expand my network and describe lesser known landmarks of India.

2. Why do you feel the need to write about lesser known or forgotten monuments? What role do monuments play in our history?

While famous landmarks are seeing huge tourist traffic, there are equally important parts of our built heritage that are being overlooked. This neglect is often linked to the neglect of the monument as well. My goal was to raise awareness and create a connection in the minds of travelers that would invoke in them the desire to visit. Monuments are tangible art forms and are the most common way to engage with history, especially for students and those in non-liberal arts streams, and a wonderful way to learn about it. more about the history of this period.

3. A monument is a monument, a piece of history. So why are some of them extremely popular and others in dire need of restoration?
The popularity of a monument depends on how it is written about and perceived as part of our collective memory. Taj Mahal is indeed one of the most magnificent specimens of architecture and has been written about by countless people. The history of the Taj Mahal as a monument of love is etched in our minds and hence it is no surprise that it is the most visited monument in India. But what about Burhanpur? Mumtaz Mahal died there and was temporarily interned in the Ahookhana. His body was brought to Agra for permanent burial six months later. This city is full of Mughal relics, memories of Abdur Rahim Khan-e Khana who served as subedar there, and Mumtaz Mahal. I hope my stories will help develop tourist traffic there which will result in the upkeep and preservation of these monuments.

4. At a time when the names of many places, cities and monuments are changing, do you feel a difference in the way authorities and people approach a monument in terms of religion? Is there something like a “Hindu monument” or a “Muslim monument”?
My goal in writing about our built heritage is to suppress this us versus them debate. Our built heritage belongs to everyone and deserves everyone’s care and attention. For me, every piece of our architectural heritage showcases the skills and dedication of our Indian craftsmen, craftsmen and architects. This is what we must celebrate. My book is dedicated to the artisans who gave their lives to leave behind monuments for posterity with a verse by Sahir Ludhianvi from his nazm ‘Taj Mahal’:

“Meri mahbub unhen bhi to mohabbat hogi
Jin ki sannai ne bakhshi hai uses shakl-e-jamil
Un ke pyaron ke maqabir rahe benam-o-numud
Aaj tak un pe jalai na kisi ne qindil”

—Sahir Ludhianvi

(My love, they must have loved too

They, whose art gave it this beautiful form

The graves of their loved ones, remain forgotten

So far no one has even lit a candle in their memory)

5. In your opinion, what is the best, but most underrated, monument in Delhi and India? Why?

If we talk about pan-India, my favorite is Fatehpur Sikri. It pales in comparison to the Taj Mahal and most visitors to Agra do not make the trip to Fatehpur Sikri. It is a testament to our glorious and syncretic history. In Delhi, my favorite haunt is the Mehrauli Archaeological Park with a history that spans from the Sultans of Delhi to the Mughals. We see the appearance of the first true arch in the tomb of Balban and the glory of a magnificent multi-coloured incised plaster ceiling in the tomb of Maulana Jamali.

6. Five books that you recommend to those who want to know more about the monuments of India?
As for the monuments of India, I have relied on the reports of the Archaeological Survey in the years from the 19th century, “Indian Architecture” by Percy Brown, “Ancient India: New Research” by Upinder Singh and Nayanjot Lahiri, “Architecture of Mughal” by Catherine Asher. India”, Ebba Koch’s “Mughal Architecture: An Outline of Its History and Development (1526–1858)” and “The Art and Archeology of Ancient India: Earliest Times to the Sixth century” by Naman Ahuja. Apart from that, there are detailed descriptions available on different individual monuments and sites.

7. Five lesser-known monuments in India that you think everyone should visit?
All monuments in Burhanpur but especially the Ahookhana where Mumtaz Mahal received temporary burial before his body was taken to Agra for burial in the Taj Mahal, Barabar Caves in Bihar, Bhitargaon Temple near Kanpur , the baolis and tombs of Chanderi, and the monuments of Gaur and Pandua in West Bengal.

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Bull Connor, George Wallace, Jefferson Davis: Who Are These Historical Villains? https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/bull-connor-george-wallace-jefferson-davis-who-are-these-historical-villains/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:15:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/bull-connor-george-wallace-jefferson-davis-who-are-these-historical-villains/ President Joe Biden’s comments on the good and the bad side of history are coming under closer scrutiny days after he sought, unsuccessfully, to win over fellow Democrats like the senses. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema to change Senate rules and enact new voting rights protections. “At important moments in history, they present a choice,” […]]]>
President Joe Biden’s comments on the good and the bad side of history are coming under closer scrutiny days after he sought, unsuccessfully, to win over fellow Democrats like the senses. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema to change Senate rules and enact new voting rights protections.

“At important moments in history, they present a choice,” Biden said in his Atlanta speech earlier this week. “Do you want to side with Dr. King or George Wallace?” Do you want to side with John Lewis or Bull Connor? Do you want to side with Abraham Lincoln or Jefferson Davis?

Everyone knows who the good guys are.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was the leader with the dream of equality that symbolizes the civil rights era. He was shot by an assassin in 1968. We celebrate his birthday with a federal holiday Monday. There is a monument to his image on the National Mall in Washington.

John Lewis was civil rights activist who was beaten on a bridge in Selma, Alabama, who served in Congress and was hailed by all political parties after his death in 2020.

Abraham Lincoln was the president who restored the union “without malice to anyone” and who was also shot by an assassin. His monument is near King’s on the Mall.

But these other names, important in history and once known throughout the country, are not so well known today.

Who are George Wallace, Bull Connor and Jefferson Davis?

Wallace, who Biden paints like a foil to King, was a longtime segregationist and former governor of Alabama. A Southern Democrat, he ran for president in 1968 under the American Independent Party and won five Southern states. He is the last candidate from a non-major party to win electoral votes.

Connor, who Biden, described as a foil for Lewis, was born Theophilus Eugene Connor. He was the former public safety commissioner of Birmingham, Alabama, who let the Ku Klux Klan beat up civil rights activists, whose police dogs intimidated protesters, and who fought integration with every fiber of his to be.

Here is a 1963 dispatch in Time magazine when black Americans in Birmingham rose up under King’s leadership:

“Birmingham was unquestionably the harshest segregated city in the South, from the point of view of Negroes. And it was symbolized by Commissioner of Public Safety Eugene (“Bull”) Connor, who had intimidated Negroes for 23 years with raucous threats and club-swinging cops. It was against Connor’s Birmingham that King secretly began recruiting volunteers. …”

Davis, who Biden referenced as a foil to Lincoln, was the president of the Confederacy – a man who helped tear the nation apart after Lincoln was elected president. Statues of Davis have been torn down in recent years, although many remain.

It’s easy to see why Biden chose these three characters as villains in his speech. Republicans bristled at being compared to Wallace, Connor and Davis.

“How deeply — deeply — unpresidential,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Capitol Hill Wednesday. “I have known, loved and personally respected Joe Biden for many years. I did not recognize the man on the podium yesterday.”
On Friday, the White House clarified Biden’s comments, arguing he was not making a “humane” comparison.

“I think anyone who listens to this speech and speaks on the level, as my mother would say, would notice that he wasn’t comparing them as humans, he was comparing choice to these characters in the story and where they go. position themselves as they determine whether or not they will support the fundamental right to vote,” said press secretary Jen Psaki.

Invoking Connor and Wallace has been popular among Democrats. Former President Barack Obama mentioned the two men at Lewis’ 2020 funeral.

“Bull Connor may be gone,” Obama said. “But today we see with our own eyes police officers kneeling on the necks of black Americans. George Wallace may be gone. But we can see our federal government dispatching officers to use tear gas and batons against protesters peaceful.”

Nor is the story as simple as Biden suggested, at least in Wallace’s case.

When he was first appointed governor in 1963, Wallace promised, in a disgusting way, “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.” He revered the Confederacy and worked to disrupt the civil rights movement, behind which the Washington Democrats were. Wallace’s appeal extended outside the South, however, even though he represented an old version of a changing party.

He ran as an American independent in 1968, but in 1972, back as a Democrat, he ran again, pushing opposition to the bus (ask Biden about that). But he was shot by a madman and his campaign was cut short even as it gathered momentum.

He still held power in the party in 1976, even though he was using a wheelchair. So much power that when he finally endorsed future President Jimmy Carter, Carter flew to Montgomery, Alabama to personally thank him for stepping out of the race.

Wallace began to regret the racism he once exploited – he expressed remorse and tried to rehabilitate his image, even asking Lewis for forgiveness. Lewis wrote a New York Times essay in 1998 after Wallace’s death, saying he should be forgiven.

“George Wallace should be remembered for his ability to change,” Lewis wrote. “And we are better off as a nation because of our ability to forgive and recognize that our political leaders are human and largely reflect the social currents in the river of history.”

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Bottega Veneta celebrates the Year of the Great Wall Tiger https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/bottega-veneta-celebrates-the-year-of-the-great-wall-tiger/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 00:04:15 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/bottega-veneta-celebrates-the-year-of-the-great-wall-tiger/ Courtesy of Bottega Veneta Towering over the Huairou district outside of Beijing, the Great Wall of China is awash in a hue of Bottega Veneta green and tangerine (a symbol of good luck in Mandarin) this week to celebrate Chinese Lunar New Year and the Year of the Tiger in 2022. The Italian house has […]]]>
Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

Towering over the Huairou district outside of Beijing, the Great Wall of China is awash in a hue of Bottega Veneta green and tangerine (a symbol of good luck in Mandarin) this week to celebrate Chinese Lunar New Year and the Year of the Tiger in 2022. The Italian house has released a series of stunning images to virtually transport people around the world with a bird’s eye view of the historic monument.

A large section of the wall reads ‘BOTTEGA VENETA’ via a digital screen while another slide reads ‘新春快乐’ which translated into English means ‘Happy New Year’.

Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

Together, Bottega Veneta has pledged to make a donation to support the renovation and maintenance of “Shanghai Pass”, the easternmost fortress of the Great Wall of China, historically known as the “First Pass under Heaven”.

To accompany the Chinese New Year celebrations from afar, Bottega Veneta has released a new campaign featuring models He Cong and Wang Chenming and photographed by Charlotte Wales. The images showcase new seasonal styles alongside a plethora of new product offerings for the season.

Courtesy of Bottega Veneta
Courtesy of Bottega Veneta

The brand’s signature leather styles, including the Acro bag, woven cassette and mini cassette, will be available in the same rich tangerine hue, adding to the already vibrant range of colourways.

In 2021, Bottega Veneta took over the famous Bondi Icebergs in Sydney, Australia, for the much-loved Salon 02 collection. Last month, the brand also announced that it would be eliminating its platforms – advertising spaces, website, newsletters, shelves and showcases – to allow local Italian bottegas to sell and promote their own artisan products.

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Harriet Tubman’s traveling sculpture unveiled in Philadelphia https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/harriet-tubmans-traveling-sculpture-unveiled-in-philadelphia/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:56:50 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/harriet-tubmans-traveling-sculpture-unveiled-in-philadelphia/ The sculpted figure of Harriet Tubman, the abolitionist and political activist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom, will stand at City Hall in Philadelphia until spring. A 9-foot-tall bronze sculpture “Harriet Tubman – The Journey To Freedom” was unveiled Tuesday by the City of Philadelphia’s Bureau of Arts, Culture and Creative Economy. “It is […]]]>

The sculpted figure of Harriet Tubman, the abolitionist and political activist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom, will stand at City Hall in Philadelphia until spring.

A 9-foot-tall bronze sculpture “Harriet Tubman – The Journey To Freedom” was unveiled Tuesday by the City of Philadelphia’s Bureau of Arts, Culture and Creative Economy.

“It is an honor to celebrate the life and legacy of Harriet Tubman here in Philadelphia,” Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney said in a statement provided by the city. “Telling these stories through public art is vital for learning and reflection, connecting with our communities and understanding our stories.

“I am especially proud that the City of Philadelphia is hosting Harriet Tubman’s temporary installation on the North Apron of City Hall while a monument to another prominent black activist, Octavius ​​Catto, lives on the South Apron. . “

A Harriet Tubman sculpture,

The city hosts the traveling monument by award-winning sculptor Wesley Wofford from January 11 to March 31. This means Philadelphia will host the Black History Month sculpture in February, as well as Women’s History Month and Harriet Tubman’s 200th birthday in March.

The sculpture represents Tubman’s “courageous journey to free slaves and beautifully illustrates her determination despite the intense opposition she faced,” the statement said.

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Kingdom’s northeast monument closes, auctioned https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kingdoms-northeast-monument-closes-auctioned/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:53:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kingdoms-northeast-monument-closes-auctioned/ BROWNINGTON, Vt. (WCAX) – A monument in the Northeastern Kingdom is closing its doors after more than 40 years of activity. “We carry a little bit of everything – we’re always open, we don’t really close,” said Andrew Swett, owner of Evansville Trading Post in Brownington. Swett has run this decades-old family business for as […]]]>

BROWNINGTON, Vt. (WCAX) – A monument in the Northeastern Kingdom is closing its doors after more than 40 years of activity.

“We carry a little bit of everything – we’re always open, we don’t really close,” said Andrew Swett, owner of Evansville Trading Post in Brownington.

Swett has run this decades-old family business for as long as he can remember. “People always say, ‘Is it for sale? I said, ‘Of course it’s for sale, we buy and we sell! This is what I have been doing for 40 years. This is what we do, ”said Swett.

Swett says he passed the traditions of the Evansville trading post down to his own children.

“This is where we raised our children. We had three children here, we sent three children to college. They kept the register when they were old enough or old enough. Seven to 9 to 10, they were keeping the register, ”Swett said.

It has been dubbed “world famous” by Swett’s father, Ralph, who founded the company. Locals would agree that the store is the heart of the community.

“I was born and raised two miles away, and he’s been here forever,” said Raymond Smith, a longtime West Charleston customer.

“I mean, it was our playground. We were playing hide and seek and we got lost in this place. It doesn’t seem like it is now, but back then it was huge, ”said Kaleb Gibson, one of the store’s two employees.

But, in fact, it’s pretty huge. The building is over 10,000 square feet and the store sells everything from mattresses and books to gasoline and breakfast.

“We are a bit exhausted. We are very exhausted, ”said Kelly Swett, who got married in the operation.

The couple say it’s time to close the doors. Kelly notes that the pandemic has taken a toll on the business.

“The emotional factor of COVID is what has really worn us out. It’s tough, and the distribution was tough. We did our best, ”she said. “People are calling. It’s just hard to get stuff. The supply chain is horrible, ”said Andrew.

They say it was a tough decision, but they are confident the bond they made will stay with them.

“We have people who come every day. If we don’t see them, we worry. “Why is this person not here, is he sick?” It won’t go away. We’re still going to worry. They are part of the family, ”Kelly said.

As for the future of the Evansville trading post, its future may be in the hands of an auction to be held at the end of the month.

“I hope this will remain a business for the community, I hope. We have no qualms about it. It would be good. There has yet to be a store in town, ”said Andrew.

Copyright 2022 WCAX. All rights reserved.


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Kelvin Hall: A Glasgow Landmark – Highlights Through History https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kelvin-hall-a-glasgow-landmark-highlights-through-history/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 10:00:01 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/kelvin-hall-a-glasgow-landmark-highlights-through-history/ Computing has been a beloved life for generations in Glasgow. Over the past century, two different Kelvin Hall buildings have stood on the same site in the west of the city. The first opened in 1918 for the purpose of hosting exhibitions and entertainment. This building was destroyed by fire in 1925 and a stately […]]]>

Computing has been a beloved life for generations in Glasgow. Over the past century, two different Kelvin Hall buildings have stood on the same site in the west of the city.

The first opened in 1918 for the purpose of hosting exhibitions and entertainment. This building was destroyed by fire in 1925 and a stately replacement was built soon after – a real phoenix rising from the ashes.

Kelvin Hall, as we know it today, opened in 1927 and has played a prominent role in Glasgow’s cultural heritage since then. Here are some important points.

Kelvin Hall in Glasgow in 1950. Photo: Newsquest

Prestigious exhibitions

Originally, Kelvin Hall housed large-scale national and international exhibitions, such as the Glasgow Civic and Empire Exhibition in 1931 and the Century of Progress Exhibition in 1935. During World War II the building was turned into a factory . for barrage and convoy balloons.

READ MORE: Secrets of turning Glasgow’s Kelvin Hall into prison for new TV series

A place in the history books

After the war, Kelvin Hall hosted the 1951 Festival of Britain, auto shows, modern house exhibitions, world boxing championships, as well as concerts by Jerry Lee Lewis, Ella Fitzgerald, Elton John and The Kinks. In 1955, American superstar evangelist Billy Graham preached there to crowded crowds as part of his six-week crusade in Scotland.

HeraldScotland: Crowds await American evangelist Billy Graham at Kelvin Hall in 1955. Photo: NewsquestCrowds await American evangelist Billy Graham at Kelvin Hall in 1955. Photo: Newsquest

All the fun of the fair

Many people will have fond memories of when the carnival and circus came to town and took up residence in Kelvin Hall. A dizzying whirlwind of sights, sounds and smells – whether it’s a little spin on the waltzers, winning over a shy coconut goldfish or the pungent stench of elephant dung that often floated in the sky. air. The renovation of the building in the 1980s marked the end of this era.

HeraldScotland: High octane scenes from the annual carnival at Kelvin Hall in Glasgow.  Image: NewsquestHigh octane scenes from the annual carnival at Kelvin Hall in Glasgow. Image: Newsquest

Wheels of Fortune

The Transport Museum moved to Kelvin Hall in Pollokshields in 1987 (it expanded again in 2011 when the Riverside Museum, designed by the late Zaha Hadid, opened). But, for those who grew up from the late 1980s to the early 2000s, or had children of their own during that time, the building will always be synonymous with cars, streetcars, and life on the fast lane.

READ MORE: Secrets of turning Glasgow’s Kelvin Hall into prison for new TV series

Sport legends

Olympic champions Dame Jessica Ennis-Hill and Sir Mo Farah, along with Scottish stars such as Liz McColgan-Nuttall and Laura Muir, are among the greats to have graced the track at Kelvin Hall during her tenure as an international athlete in room. place. The arena has also hosted world-class gymnastics, with the Glasgow Grand Prix and World Cup taking place over several years.



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Reviews | What January 6th in 2086 might look like https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/reviews-what-january-6th-in-2086-might-look-like/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 10:00:11 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/reviews-what-january-6th-in-2086-might-look-like/ This article is part of a collection of the events of January 6, a year later. Read more in a note by Times Opinion political editor Ezekiel Kweku in our Opinion Today newsletter. The year is 2086. At a dedication ceremony in the Statuary Hall of the United States Capitol, visitors listen to august speeches […]]]>

This article is part of a collection of the events of January 6, a year later. Read more in a note by Times Opinion political editor Ezekiel Kweku in our Opinion Today newsletter.

The year is 2086. At a dedication ceremony in the Statuary Hall of the United States Capitol, visitors listen to august speeches on a dark day long ago when patriots fought to defend democracy. . The crowd erupts into applause as the fabric covering the new statue falls. Marble megaphone in the air, headdress and gleaming horns, the shaman QAnon of January 6, 2021, takes his place among the heroes of American history.

If it seems exaggerated that a notorious insurgent could be given such a place of honor, the past is far from the same. When Confederate President Jefferson Davis was jailed after the Civil War (rumored to be wearing his own odd costume at the time of his arrest) he was more vilified and mocked than any rioter on Capitol Hill. , and its far more serious crimes. His statue joined that of George Washington on Capitol Hill 65 years later.

As curators of the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian, we are regularly confronted with hard physical evidence of how slippery the past can be. Materials brought in by curators long ago take on unintended meanings. The objects we’ve collected, which almost seem to speak for themselves when we catalog them, might find an entirely different use behind glass decades from now.

It is scary, but not impossible, to imagine the signs screaming “Stop Theft!” Picked up from the trash-strewn National Mall on January 7, 2021, once treated like patriotic treasures, displayed next to the desk Thomas Jefferson used to draft the Declaration of Independence or the inkwell Abraham Lincoln dived into to compose the emancipation proclamation.

When the crowd broke into the halls of Congress for the first time, the bewilderment on their faces indicated that many hadn’t planned on breaking into the story. And yet, as our allies have struggled over the past year to minimize the onslaught, many of us have looked to the future, hoping for some clarification of our chaotic era. When everything is finally known, we say to ourselves, there will be no longer any doubt about the person responsible for this singular attack on the functioning of our democracy. Their names will live in infamy. History, we believe, will judge them harshly.

History, however, may have other plans. Unlike the mantra, it has neither a good nor a bad side. A generation after secession, the famous historian James Ford Rhodes declared that “the judgment of posterity is established: it was an unjust cause which the South defended by arms”, at the same time when statues of Confederate generals were placed on pedestals all over the country. nation. Rhodes was not wrong in his reading of Confederation, but in his faith in “the judgment of posterity.”

Judging, it turns out, is not the strong point of the story. Notions of justice change dramatically over time, and this is not the reason we collect, preserve or display artifacts from the past. For curators and historians, the evolving meaning of our objects is far more fascinating than what they call unfair. The Smithsonian’s collections contain, for example, pikes from the failed slave rebellion of John Brown in the South in 1859. At various times since then his pikes have symbolized a demented terrorist’s plan for the murder of mass, the fiery crusade of a religious fanatic and the loneliness of a hero fighting for justice.

President Andrew Jackson’s dueling pistols – once proof of the aggressive populism of a fighter honored at Democratic banquets and the names of generations of boys – could no longer be displayed without mentioning the ethnic cleansing of Native Americans for which he was is often beaten.

Moments that outwardly resemble January 6, involving both violent mobs and their powerful enablers, have proven particularly ripe for revision, following a familiar pattern of normalization and valuation. When gangs of anti-Catholic fanatics ransacked a Charlestown, Massachusetts convent before burning it down in 1834, it was one of the most explosive outbursts of rampant 19th-century nativism. Yet in the aftermath of the attack, no less a character than telegraph developer (and vocal opponent of immigration) Samuel Morse looked eerily like recent apologists defending so-called January 6 political prisoners. “I don’t know of anyone who justifies the unlawful violence,” he said, “but I say without hesitation that the feeling of indignation that animated the population was a just and proper feeling.

Nothing in our past, as blatant as it may seem to us today, guarantees eternal condemnation. Even bloody undemocratic coups can find their monuments. In the aftermath of the 1872 Louisiana governor election, won by a multiracial Republican coalition of 56 to 43 percent, the losing white supremacist Democrats launched two uprisings, murdered police officers, waged war on federal troops in the United States. streets of New Orleans and even captured former Confederate General James Longstreet (then fighting the coup). An obelisk commemorating the second of these uprisings was erected in New Orleans 18 years after the firing stopped and did not fall until 2017.

Of course, our immediate future may shape the distant memory of January 6. The elections of 2022 and 2024 will help determine whether the big lie becomes the official truth. Already a significant segment of the population has embraced the fictions about the attack on the Capitol. In a national poll recently released by the University of Massachusetts, more than 30% of those polled said they did not accept the legitimacy of President Biden’s victory in 2020, and 25% objected to investigating those who sought to overturn the elections.

Our recent reckoning with American history has shown the indelible impact of stilted forms of institutional power, such as dedicating monuments, inscribing plaques, and holding hearings. Devoting rioters to the rank of heroes could be done quite discreetly. Those who live in a fake news bubble have shown their willingness to falsify history as well. After the Commission of 1776 and state-level bans on teaching America’s racist past, we should also be ready to see the January 6 laundering.

History also shows that an unknown policy in the distant future will color the memory of January 6. Like the rebels of the last days who adopted the Confederate flag as a fuzzy symbol of Southern heritage, white supremacy and general misanthropy, January 6 could be honored by people who share little more than desire. to offend. Or a national reconciliation, after the end of our era of division, could lead Americans on both sides of this story to absurdity, flaunting the riot shields side by side of far-right terrorists and counter-protesters. liberals in museums as moral equivalents.

And no matter who wins the historic wars of the future, the horrific attack on the Capitol is likely to one day annoy schoolchildren when asked about Bunker Hill, the Compromise of 1850, the Battle of the Bulge and January 6, whatever it is. Our trauma will be their duty.

There is no control over what the future will say about us. Generations keep flowing in, reassessing old heroes and asking new questions. Children present at the unveiling of the Capitoline Shaman statue in 2086 (should that or other mind-boggling commemorations happen) may grow up to challenge their parents’ accounts of January 6. Possibly the Smithsonian items of the time – the dusty suit of a congressman who helped clean up the Capitol after the attack, the badges worn by members of the National Guard who protected Washington in the aftermath. , the signs with religious and political slogans that the rioters have used to justify the violence – will help guide these young people to an evidence-based reading of the past.

We cannot know; we have no ownership over what is to come. The best we can do is carefully map our moment, to preserve road signs that will lead to a place we will never see.

As curators, as historians, as citizens, we are frequently reminded that the past is a foreign country. But the future too.


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Colston statue trial jury urged to ‘be on the right side of history’ | Bristol https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/colston-statue-trial-jury-urged-to-be-on-the-right-side-of-history-bristol/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:12:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/colston-statue-trial-jury-urged-to-be-on-the-right-side-of-history-bristol/ A jury has been called on to “be on the right side of history” by acquitting four defendants charged with criminal damages for the overturning of the statue of slave trader Edward Colston. In closing speeches in Bristol Crown Court on Tuesday, lawyers for the defendants argued that the statue, which towered over the multicultural […]]]>

A jury has been called on to “be on the right side of history” by acquitting four defendants charged with criminal damages for the overturning of the statue of slave trader Edward Colston.

In closing speeches in Bristol Crown Court on Tuesday, lawyers for the defendants argued that the statue, which towered over the multicultural South West city for 125 years, was so indecent and potentially abusive as to constitute a crime.

“Make no mistake, members of the jury, your decision will not only be felt in this courtroom or in this city,” said Liam Walker QC, representing Sage Willoughby. “It will reverberate around the world. I urge you all to be on the right side of the story.

Rhian Graham, 30, Milo Ponsford, 26, and Sage Willoughby, 22, are accused along with “other strangers” of helping tie ropes around the statue’s neck and using them to pull it from its plinth in Bristol during a Black Lives Matter event on June 7, 2020.

They are on trial alongside Jake Skuse, 33, accused of helping to ship him to Bristol harbor, where he was dumped into the River Avon. All argued that their actions were justified by the offense caused by the statue.

“Each of those defendants were on the right side of history, and I think they were on the right side of the law as well,” Walker said. “Colston’s actions may be historic, but his continued reverence in this town was not. The continued worship of him in a vibrant multicultural city was an act of abuse.

“The Colston statue normalized the abuse. He tolerated the acceptance of racism by shrugging his shoulders. He celebrated the accomplishments of a racist mass murderer. The continued existence of this statue was a racist hate crime.

Defendants Rhian Graham (second from right) and Milo Ponsford (right) return to Bristol Crown Court after lunch on closing day of oral argument. Photograph: Finnbarr Webster / Getty Images

Tom Wainwright, representing Ponsford, suggested that the statue’s historical significance, and therefore value, was increased by its overthrow – that instead of destroying history, those on trial had “created history”, while correcting the Colston crime file.

“You might think it would bring the criminal justice system into disrepute if a person were found guilty of causing criminal damage to something by adding value to it, making it better,” Wainwright said. “Ask yourself: What was this statue worth before June 7, 2020, and what is it worth now? “

Closing for the crown, William Hughes QC told jurors it was not Colston who was on trial.

“We made it clear when we first spoke to you at the outset of this matter that we did not dispute that Edward Colston’s story was inundated with his direct involvement in the slave trade,” said Hughes. .

“You have heard detailed and very moving testimony in this regard from David Olusoga. We are not Edward Colston’s apologists, but he and his ilk are not judged. “

Hughes said that despite the many testimonies heard about Colston and Bristol’s involvement in the slave trade; the impact of the statue on the city’s current black residents; and the inability of local politicians to take action, the trial was “not a public inquiry”, not about politics or emotions.

“This trial is about hard and cold facts and it’s fundamentally about the rule of law,” Hughes said. “If we can just remove what offends us, whatever the opinions of others, what are the next statues, institutions or buildings, you might ask.” “

Skuse, Graham, Ponsford and Willoughby all deny criminal damages. The trial continues.


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