French history – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 17:15:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png French history – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Rwandan referee creates Africa Cup of Nations history https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/rwandan-referee-creates-africa-cup-of-nations-history/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 16:48:11 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/rwandan-referee-creates-africa-cup-of-nations-history/ Published on: 01/18/2022 – 17:48Amended: 01/18/2022 – 17:46 Yaounde (AFP) – Rwanda’s Salima Mukansanga became the first woman to referee an Africa Cup of Nations match when she oversaw the Group B clash between Guinea and Zimbabwe in Yaoundé on Tuesday. A statement from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) on Monday said Mukansanga would […]]]>

Published on: Amended:

Yaounde (AFP) – Rwanda’s Salima Mukansanga became the first woman to referee an Africa Cup of Nations match when she oversaw the Group B clash between Guinea and Zimbabwe in Yaoundé on Tuesday.

A statement from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) on Monday said Mukansanga would manage the match with two female assistant referees, Carine Atemzabong from Cameroon and Fatiha Jermoumi from Morocco.

However, when the officials entered the pitch for the game at the Ahmadou Ahidjo stadium in the Cameroonian capital, the two assistant referees were male.

CAF did not immediately explain why the assistant referees had been changed.

Mukansanga made history after the 32 previous editions of Africa’s flagship tournament in 1957 were refereed exclusively by men.

Previously, the Rwandan was the fourth referee when Guinea beat Malawi on January 10 in Bafoussam.

“We are very proud of Salima because she had to work exceptionally hard to be where she is today,” said Confederation of African Football (CAF) referee boss Eddy Maillet of Seychelles.

“We know that as a woman she had to overcome serious obstacles to reach this level and she deserves a lot of credit.

“This moment is not just for Salima, but for all the young girls in Africa who have a passion for football and who see themselves as referees in the future.”

Leaders Guinea need a point to secure a place in the second round while Zimbabwe play for pride after being knocked out after two defeats.

]]>
These 2 Michigan homes earn spots on the National Register of Historic Places https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/these-2-michigan-homes-earn-spots-on-the-national-register-of-historic-places/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 23:42:26 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/these-2-michigan-homes-earn-spots-on-the-national-register-of-historic-places/ The stately features of a brown brick home perched near a rural road in Northfield Township are so distinctive that passers-by have stopped and snapped photos. Some even park in the driveway not far from an orchard, a hint of its past as part of a more than 150-year-old farmhouse, to approach the five-panel wooden […]]]>

The stately features of a brown brick home perched near a rural road in Northfield Township are so distinctive that passers-by have stopped and snapped photos.

Some even park in the driveway not far from an orchard, a hint of its past as part of a more than 150-year-old farmhouse, to approach the five-panel wooden gates at the entrance lined with white and ask the owners how they came to find such a lovely place.

Although Victor Volkman has lived there since the 1980s, he often shares the admiration of visitors.

“It’s a unique architecture,” he said. “It’s like a museum, a bit.”

Government officials felt his home and another in southeast Michigan deserved a permanent place in history.

This month the pair of properties, known as Walbri Hall in Bloomfield Hills and Nathan Esek and Sarah Emergene Sutton House in rural Washtenaw County, were added to the National Register of Historic Places.

]]>
Not ‘end of the matter’ but French enthusiasm is fading https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/not-end-of-the-matter-but-french-enthusiasm-is-fading/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 08:14:20 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/not-end-of-the-matter-but-french-enthusiasm-is-fading/ The game was in overtime and Castres lost six points. After losing their home opener to Harlequins, they were set to suffer back-to-back Champions Cup defeats. A lackluster Munster, having taken the lead in a terrible encounter, defended a scrum just inside the opposition half. They appeared to have returned the ball but Castres retained […]]]>

The game was in overtime and Castres lost six points.

After losing their home opener to Harlequins, they were set to suffer back-to-back Champions Cup defeats.

A lackluster Munster, having taken the lead in a terrible encounter, defended a scrum just inside the opposition half.

They appeared to have returned the ball but Castres retained possession and would have one last chance to attack and get their campaign firmly back on track.

Enter Ben Urdapilleta.

The veteran halfback snatched the ball from the bottom of the ruck and kicked it dead. Game over.

‘Play, play’, it was not.

Enough. The castrated half Ben Urdapilleta ends the match against Munster

“Whore !” someone shouted in an Irish accent as the Munster players looked around in puzzlement and relief.

Castres, who had sent a second chain, did not want to be there.

In fact, their chairman, following the games between the UK and France, called their trip to Limerick “absurd”.

It’s fair to say that there are mixed emotions in France about this competition which, again this year, has been ravaged by cancellations and postponements linked to Covid-19.

For every burst of color on the canvas of the Heineken Cup by Toulouse and Toulon and Biarritz and Clermont and Racing 92 over the last quarter century, there have been equal measure of teams that have thrown themselves into matches of hen with all the enthusiasm of a vandal doing community service.

And it’s not just pool games that seem to bring out this carefree attitude.

Trailing by just eight points against Leinster with half an hour remaining in the 2019 semi-finals, then-four-time winners Toulouse pulled captain Jerome Kaino out of action.

The former All Black went to the post-match press conference after the defeat with little injury or regret in his demeanor.

Ugo Mola’s men won the Brennas Shield two months later.

It may seem harsh to go after Stade Toulousain who, regardless of some other Top14 formations, have generally given themselves body and soul to the Champions Cup, but on this occasion their objective was the Shield , a competition that dates back to 1892.

Their victory that season was their first Top14 success in seven years.

Toulouse is the defending champion

The history of Toulouse with the competition, the crazy and passionate love of Toulon with the tournament between 2013 and 2015, the color of Clermont and the newcomers La Rochelle and the race for the European title of Racing 92 show that the event, taken seriously, is a much more pleasant experience.

But ultimately money talks.

The Top14 is worth €110m for the clubs and with the threat of relegation also in the mix, wiser and more practical heads prevail.

The French league is a brutal and relentless affair and some clubs just don’t have the depth strength to fight on two fronts. Philippe Saint-André, boss of Leinster’s opponents tomorrow, falls into this category.

The latest major shake-up to the tournament meant that French rugby audiences lost most of their terrestrial TV access to the Champions Cup, lowering visibility.

“The public have lost touch with the European Cup, in a way,” Sud Ouest sports editor Arnaud David told RTÉ Sport.

Add to that the chaos caused by Covid this year and last and as Bernard Jackman told the RTÉ Rugby podcast this week: “The French and the English were very lukewarm about this year’s competition. The way they managed the second round added to the discontent.”

Clermont, three-time runners-up beaten, lost their opening match against Ulster at home.

Their second round match against Sale was one of the draws to be declared 0-0 with two pool points for each team.

“I joined this club eight years ago,” stalwart Camille Lopez said on Wednesday.

“ASM had an incredible European Cup culture. It was really something very important and it is very important.

“I won’t hide it from you, the European Cup as it is this year, frankly, it’s much less motivating.

“We had just lost at home against Ulster, we had taken a point, we had prepared the week to go and win there because it was important for our continuation in this competition.

“So, [Sale] will say they got screwed because they lost two points at home.

“I don’t know if we can say we are winners because what we were going for is a win for them to still be competitive in this European Cup.

“In the end, neither is advantageous. I think it’s a waste [désordre], clearly. I do not know what to say. Frankly, this competition, I don’t know if it rhymes with anything.”

Christophe Urios, head coach of Bordeaux-Bègles, says: “This competition has no meaning anymore… it’s rubbish.”

The big hits from the big hitters just keep coming.

Former French striker Sébastien Chabal [above], an influential rugby media pundit in the country, told Canal+ last week “the European Cup means nothing…it’s a disaster…what will the champions be worth?”

However, it can be pointed out that Canal+ owns the rights to the Top14 and has its own programming problems with the postponed match of this competition.

There was good news on Thursday when French authorities changed protocols which meant teams from the UK could travel without undergoing a 48-hour quarantine upon arrival, so those matches were lit green.

Another English boycott would have been the last thing European Professional Club Rugby needed and very few believe there are no more twists this season.

Leinster, quadruple winners, will not worry too much about the French state of mind with Montpellier, currently fourth in the Top14, visitors to the RDS tomorrow (1 p.m.).

But that does not mean that they do not know which way the wind is blowing and that they have estimated that

“It was interesting to listen to Philippe Saint-André talk about his team, Montpellier at Exeter,” said Leo Cullen.

“He said he was under pressure to manage some of his players. It’s almost like they prioritize the Top 14 over Europe.

“Anyone who knows us here would know that we think differently.

“We would go full steam ahead.”

It’s a slightly different perspective when there are bits of muscle bursting into you.

“Every time I’ve played against the French opposition I know they were up for it,” prop Andrew Porter told RTÉ Sport this week.

“Given our outing last year against La Rochelle, we knew they were up for it.

“I wouldn’t agree that [French sides] compare everything that happens in the Top14 because every time we play against them it’s always a daunting battle and you have to have a cool head and give your best on that day.”

Leinster assistant manager Robin McBryde, whose side have now gone five weeks without a game, said: “It changes depending on which club you are at.

“Some clubs, if they go through a tough time in the Top 14, focus more on survival, instead of doing something in Europe.

“Montpellier will take this game seriously, there’s no doubt about it. They’re going high.

“They have too many quality players and if you go to a competition that you still have a chance of winning, you’ll sell yourself there a lot more.”

This is probably not the end of the French affair but the EPCR will pray that this round goes off without a hitch.

Listen to the RTÉ Rugby podcast on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

Follow Connacht v Leicester (Saturday, 3.15pm), Leinster v Montpellier (Sunday, 1pm) and Northampton v Ulster (Sunday, 3.15pm) via our live blogs at rte.ie/sport or on the RTÉ News app, or listen live radio coverage of Connacht v Leicester on RTÉ Radio 1.

]]>
Is it good to talk? A History of the West’s Summits with Russia | Russia https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/is-it-good-to-talk-a-history-of-the-wests-summits-with-russia-russia/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 15:35:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/is-it-good-to-talk-a-history-of-the-wests-summits-with-russia-russia/ So The stakes for Europe’s future security architecture are high by Russia and the threat of war in Ukraine is so imminent that the three separate meetings held between Russia and the West this week compare to some of the big ones -Russian exchanges of the past, from Yalta in 1945 to Paris in 1960, […]]]>

So The stakes for Europe’s future security architecture are high by Russia and the threat of war in Ukraine is so imminent that the three separate meetings held between Russia and the West this week compare to some of the big ones -Russian exchanges of the past, from Yalta in 1945 to Paris in 1960, on the future of Berlin, and from Reykjavík in 1986.

Vladimir Putin, with his keen sense of his place in Russian history, would probably welcome such comparisons. Indeed, the very scheduling of the three meetings – a bilateral security meeting with the United States on Monday, a rare NATO-Russian Council meeting on Wednesday, and a meeting of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) in Ukraine on Thursday – is seen by some as a mistake.

Winston Churchill with Franklin D Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin during the Yalta Accord talks in February 1945. The Accord was instrumental in the partition of Germany and the creation of the United Nations. Photograph: PA

Françoise Thom, historian of Russia based at the Sorbonne, said: “There is nothing more dangerous than these exchanges at the top which, whatever may be said, inevitably fuel either paranoia or the madness of grandeur. and the intoxication of power of the Russian ruling elites. If the West is firm, the Kremlin concludes that it wants to destroy Russia; if the west offers concessions, the Kremlin concludes that it is weak and that the pressure must be increased.

“Very often the best policy with Russia is one of silence and distance: do nothing, say nothing and hold on. Hanging on to dialogue at all costs, especially when Moscow is holding us up like a madman holding a hostage, only shows our weakness and encourages the Kremlin to escalate.

But Joe Biden clearly felt that with allied self-discipline and unity, the risks of being seen as rewarding Putin are outweighed by the need for dialogue and diplomatic recognition.

Not to speak would be to feed the Russian narrative that the West is not even ready to listen to. In addition, it is a dialogue and not a negotiation, according to the officials.

The specific agenda for each meeting next week is subtly different, and while the West will want the discussion to focus on Ukraine’s sovereignty and missile placement, Russia will want a response to its three formal demands spelled out last month in the draft treaties: the withdrawal of US nuclear weapons from Europe, the withdrawal of NATO forces near Russian borders and the permanent legal renunciation of NATO membership for the Ukraine and Georgia, as part of a commitment to end NATO enlargement.

One way or another, these have been the enduring demands of the Russian political elite over the past 20 years. Putin’s demands are comparable to Dmitry Medvedev’s widely ignored European security treaty proposal in 2009, but this time the demands are presented in a more peremptory manner. Indeed, some Western officials fear they have been conditioned to be rejected.

Dmitry Medvedev, Nicolas Sarkozy and Angela Merkel after a press conference in Deauville, France, in October 2010.
Dmitry Medvedev, Nicolas Sarkozy and Angela Merkel after a press conference in Deauville, France, in October 2010. Photograph: Horacio Villalobos / EPA

In Ukraine, there are fears that the dialogue with Russia on the future security architecture of Europe, under the threat of blackmail and without a formal presence of the EU bloc, will be seen as a justification by Putin. From Putin’s point of view, he has already made progress and can do more. Russian think tanks like IMEMO say, for example, that the meeting shows that “the ice is already broken”.

It is the bread and butter of diplomacy to judge whether to “talk” – as Churchill put it – with an adversary either in the open or through a roundabout channel, or rather sit and wait. Never is this judgment more acute than in the case of Russia.

The assertion of the American Cold War diplomat George Kennan was that “Moscow is a special case”. He saw security “only in [a] patient but deadly struggle for the total destruction of [the] rival power, never in pacts and compromises with it ”. He said that the Soviet Union under Stalin was a master of the art of distorting American offers for dialogue, for example on the future of Berlin in April 1949, into a large-scale offer to redraw the map of the United States. Europe. The solution was patience and containment.

For a while, Henry Kissinger argued that the State Department was populated by naive men who believed that a well-constructed argument could persuade Russia. The whole idea of ​​signing treaties with Russia was to misunderstand the mentality. Russia, it has been said, operated by probing weaknesses, “kicking every door and seeing which ones fell off their hinges.”

Alexander Cadogan, the wartime permanent secretary of the British Foreign Office, made a similar remark in his diaries about the asymmetry in talks with Russia: “Everything favors the evildoer. Any honest government fights (in peacetime) with both hands tied behind its back. The brilliant shine of the Russians is something we can admire but cannot emulate. This gives them a great advantage.

In contrast, the instinct of most politicians is often to parley, or to seek a personal charm of reset or confidence. Churchill once said that all the world’s problems could be solved if only he could meet Joseph Stalin once a week. John F Kennedy argued that it is better to “meet at the top than at the edge of the abyss,” which the United States has attempted more regularly after the shock of the Cuban missile crisis. Famous during the Reykjavík Conference of 1986, a personal relationship between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev brought them to the brink of abandoning nuclear weapons. George Shultz, US Secretary of State, recalled that in advance “there was a unique sense of uncertainty in the air … Nothing seemed to be predictable.” Gorbachev’s surprise plan, almost taken up by Reagan, showed the value of dialogue, though Margaret Thatcher later confided her despair over Reagan to Robin Butler, her cabinet secretary: “He doesn’t know anything, Robin.

Mikhail Gorbachev speaks with Ronald Reagan in Reykjavík during their summit meeting in October 1986.
Mikhail Gorbachev speaks with Ronald Reagan in Reykjavík during their summit meeting in October 1986. Photograph: Mike Sargent / AFP

Reagan’s successor, George HW Bush, no longer promised a chaotic Reykjavíks, but at a summit in Malta in 1989, the first meeting since the fall of the Berlin Wall, he too was captured by the sense of l ‘story of Gorbachev (“the United States and the USSR is doomed to cooperate for a long time”) and by his plea that “we must abandon the images of an enemy.” In reality, Gorbachev was betrayed during ‘a dinner the next evening in Brussels where Bush gave Chancellor Kohl the green light for the unification of Germany, opening the long controversy over the terms of NATO’s eastward expansion, starting with East Germany.

With Gorbachev crushed by events, the Bill and Boris show ensued. Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin, charged with integrating Russia into the international system, have met face to face 18 times, often clashing with NATO expansion, leading Yeltsin to describe a cold peace. Perhaps the climax was the Birmingham summit in 1998, when relations were so intimate that they exchanged their respective confidential fact sheets. That relationship likely fell apart during a phone call of unchecked fury over the NATO bombing of Serbia a year later. He has shown that when fundamental interests conflict, as they did with NATO, personal relationships only get you to a point.

Afterwards, the era of two men sitting alone to solve the world was over. Barack Obama signed a new strategic arms control treaty, Start, in April 2010 with Medvedev, but Putin’s return to the presidency in 2012 saw the reset fail.

Boris Yeltsin receives Bill Clinton at Yeltsin's residence during the 1998 G8 summit in Birmingham, England
Boris Yeltsin receives Bill Clinton at Yeltsin’s residence during the 1998 G8 summit in Birmingham, UK. Photograph: Tass / Getty Images

In essence, the dispute over the wisdom of dialogue boils down to whether Russia is seen to be driven by insecurity or imperial expansionism. In political terms, this meant choosing between a focus on arms control or NATO expansion.

But there’s also a professional diplomat’s aversion to large, unstructured gatherings, whether or not they involve Russia. Harold Nicolson, after a long diplomatic career, told the Commons in 1935: “It is a terrible mistake to conduct negotiations between foreign ministers… it is better to leave international negotiations to the professionals. Diplomacy is not the art of conversation. It is the art of exchanging documents in a carefully thought out and precise form and in such a way that they cannot be repudiated later … Conference diplomacy is a mistake.

The concern of the professional diplomat is that in the emotion of the moment the resolve dissipates and the predefined red lines are erased and allies betrayed.

With the Biden administration, this week’s talks are expected to be much more structured, predictable, and scripted. In theory, given that none of the main ones – Biden and Putin – will be in Geneva, there shouldn’t be a rush of blood to the head from men of goodwill, but rather a staking out of familiar positions.

Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin meet for the US-Russia summit at Villa La Grange in Geneva, Switzerland, in June 2021.
Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin meet for the US-Russia summit at Villa La Grange in Geneva, Switzerland, in June 2021. Photograph: Kevin Lamarque / Reuters

The US message, supported by the UK, has been carefully framed and appears to be well coordinated with Europe. NATO expansion was inherent in the Founding Act of NATO-Russia signed by Boris Yeltsin in 1997. No country can determine the foreign alliances of another country, as Russia agreed in the ‘Helsinki Final Act in 1975, and again in the Budapest Memorandum in 1994. In the words of Sauli Niinistö, the Finnish President, in his landmark New Year speech: “Spheres of interest do not belong to 2020s. Sovereign equality of all States is the basic principle that everyone must respect.

But the test, according to Evelyn Farkas, former Deputy US Defense Secretary for Russia, will be whether Putin sees this week’s talks as a political play, a time to issue an ultimatum, or whether he sees this week’s talks as a political play. allow Russia to step into the weeds and start negotiating. Few people keep much hope for the latter.


Source link

]]>
Autonomous racing cars make history at CES https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/autonomous-racing-cars-make-history-at-ces/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 05:14:14 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/autonomous-racing-cars-make-history-at-ces/ Published on: 08/01/2022 – 06:14 Las Vegas (AFP) – A race car with no one behind the wheel meandered around another to take the lead on an oval track at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Friday in an unprecedented high-speed match between autonomous vehicles. Members of the Italian-American team PoliMOVE applauded when […]]]>

Published on:

Las Vegas (AFP) – A race car with no one behind the wheel meandered around another to take the lead on an oval track at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas on Friday in an unprecedented high-speed match between autonomous vehicles.

Members of the Italian-American team PoliMOVE applauded when their Formula 1 racing car, nicknamed “Minerva”, repeatedly passed a rival entered by South Korean team Kaist.

Minerva was traveling nearly 115 miles per hour (185 kilometers per hour) when she passed the Kaist car, easily beating the top speed expected by race organizers.

But every rider was considered a winner by the organizers who saw the real victory as the fact that autonomous driving algorithms could handle the competition at high speed.

“It’s a success,” Paul Mitchell, co-organizer of the Indy Autonomous Challenge (IAC), told AFP before the checkered flag was waved.

The race pitted student teams from around the world to increase the capabilities of self-driving cars, improving the technology for use anywhere.

In October, the IAC put the brakes on self-driving F1 car racing to give technology more time for the challenge, preferring to let them take individual laps to see which had the best time.

Cars are packed with electronic sensors where the driver would normally be Patrick T. FALLON AFP

“It almost holds the world record for self-driving car speed,” boasted PoliMOVE engineer Davide Rigamonti, gazing lovingly at the white and black beauty.

The single seat usually reserved for a pilot was during this race rather crammed with electronics.

PoliMOVE had a chance for victory in another race in October in Indianapolis, clocking around 155 miles per hour (250 kilometers per hour) before slipping into a curve, according to Rigamonti.

On Friday, it was the South Korean entry that spun after passing a car lined up by a team from Auburn University in the state of Alabama, in the southern United States.

“The students who program these cars aren’t mechanics; most of them didn’t know anything about racing,” said Lee Anne Patterson, IndyCar specialist.

“We taught them to race.”

Students program the software that drives the car by quickly analyzing data from sophisticated sensors.

The car control software must anticipate the behavior of other vehicles on the course and then maneuver accordingly, according to Markus Lienkamp, ​​professor at Munich, TUM, who won the October competition.

The PoliMOVE autonomous racing car from Politecnico di Milano (Italy) and the University of Alabama.  The car control software must anticipate the behavior of other vehicles on the course, then maneuver accordingly
The PoliMOVE autonomous racing car from Politecnico di Milano (Italy) and the University of Alabama. The car control software must anticipate the behavior of other vehicles on the course, then maneuver accordingly Patrick T. FALLON AFP

Nearby, Lienkamp students are glued to screens.

“It plays out in milliseconds,” Mitchell said.

“The computer has to make the same decisions as a human driver, despite the speed.”

The IAC plans to hold more races modeled on Friday’s – pitting two cars against each other, with the hope of reaching a level high enough to someday launch all the vehicles together.


Source link

]]>
Chicago, Capitol Riot, ‘Scream’: Your Wednesday Night Briefing https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/chicago-capitol-riot-scream-your-wednesday-night-briefing/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 23:08:33 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/chicago-capitol-riot-scream-your-wednesday-night-briefing/ (Want to receive this newsletter in your inbox? Here is registration.) Good evening. Here is the latest Wednesday at the end of the day. 1. The Omicron Disruption hits Chicago hard. After two days of returning to classrooms, the city’s teachers’ union voted to stop reporting for work over concerns the school system was messing […]]]>

(Want to receive this newsletter in your inbox? Here is registration.)

Good evening. Here is the latest Wednesday at the end of the day.

1. The Omicron Disruption hits Chicago hard.

After two days of returning to classrooms, the city’s teachers’ union voted to stop reporting for work over concerns the school system was messing up its response to the highly contagious variant of the coronavirus. The city responded by canceling the school altogether.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot insisted the city’s classrooms were safe, accused teachers of engaging in an illegal work stoppage, and refused to allow classes to switch to teaching in distance, which the union had suggested. The struggle has left parents scrambling to find child care.

2. President Emmanuel Macron has drawn strong criticism after bluntly saying that the government should make life miserable for the unvaccinated.

“I really want to piss them off,” Macron said, referring to the unvaccinated in an interview with a panel of readers of Le Parisien, a newspaper. “And so we’re going to keep doing it, until the end.”

Macron appeared to be trying to capitalize on frustration in France with the unvaccinated as skyrocketing infection rates put him under pressure ahead of a presidential election in three months, our correspondent wrote.

In other virus news:


4. A fire in a row house in Philadelphia killed at least 13 people, including seven children.

The fire in the city’s Fairmount neighborhood was one of the deadliest residential fires in recent Canadian history. The building was managed by the Philadelphia Housing Authority, funded by the federal government. “This is without a doubt one of the most tragic days in our city’s history, the loss of so many people in such a tragic way,” said Mayor Jim Kenney.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation. At least four of the building’s smoke detectors did not go off, a fire official said. There were 26 people in the duplex at the time of the fire, including eight people on the first floor.

5. Toddlers discover guns under sofa cushions. Teens get untraceable ghost guns made from kits. College students carry handguns for protection.

Number of children 14 and under shot dead increased by around 50% during coronavirus pandemic, CDC says

Researchers attribute the increase in part to a wave of arms purchases during a pandemic. The peak has sounded the alarm to law enforcement and families, but police departments and cities across the country are struggling to respond.


6. Thousands of people across Kazakhstan are taking to the streets because of soaring fuel prices.

The protests, which began on Sunday, are the biggest wave of protests to sweep the oil-rich country in decades. Protesters stormed government buildings in Kazakhstan’s largest city, Almaty, and torched the offices of the ruling Nur Otan party.

As the protests continued, the president vowed “to act with maximum tenacity.” Local media reported that police opened fire on protesters in the oil town of Atyrau, killing at least one person. Authorities have shut down the Internet and blocked social networks and chat applications.

Kazakhstan is at the heart of what Russian President Vladimir Putin sees as the Kremlin’s sphere of influence. The pro-Kremlin media described the events as a conspiracy against Russia. Here’s what’s behind Kazakhstan’s biggest crisis in decades.


7. Two types of dangerous air pollution more often overlap as wildfires and extreme heat hit the western United States, researchers said.

From 2000 to 2020, millions of people were exposed to more days of combined ozone smoke each year, and researchers suggest the increase is linked to climate change. High levels of either pollutant can be damaging, “but when they both happen at the same time then you get the worst of both worlds,” said a climatologist.

Separately, we visited a nature reserve in Oregon that is basically a big forest fire laboratory. Researchers say that forest management methods such as controlled burns can be an important factor in reducing the intensity of forest fires.


8. They screamed, we screamed and now they’re in “Scream” again.

After more than a decade, Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox and David Arquette are returning to try another shot in the meta-horror franchise. But they didn’t jump in right away: they couldn’t imagine it without the original director, Wes Craven, who passed away in 2015. Eventually they all agreed, and now they’re back (along with another Ghostface) for the restart -meet-continued.

We also spoke to Willem Dafoe, Alfred Molina and Jamie Foxx – three actors very good to be bad – about reprising their villainous roles in “Spider-Man: No Way Home”.

9. Los Angeles is the glorious sushi capital of the United States, writes our California food critic.

Few places outside of Japan can match the variety, skill, and creativity served at the city’s countless sushi counters. The sushi chefs there “continually divert our attention from the intensity of one pleasure, to another and another, until the meal is suddenly and sadly over – a super cup of delicacies, a blur,” writes Tejal Rao.

And for a taste of the disappearance of New York, Dorie Greenspan makes this poppy seed cake, a reminder of her childhood and her mostly missing businesses.


10. And finally, will you marry me?

No force of nature, not even a pandemic, could stop many couples from saying “yes”. Marriage stories from all over the world filled the Times wedding pages last year, but before those weddings came the proposals. Our journalist Weddings has collected his favorites.

In South Africa, a man asked a lion cub to give his ring to his fiancee. In a Chicago proposal, the ring was the last element of an obstacle course. Another happened during a flight over the Atlantic. John Shults Jr. proposed steadily for over a year to Joy Morrow-Nulton, both 95, until she finally said yes. “I wasn’t going to give up until she said yes because she was worth it,” Shults said.

Have a romantic evening.


Sean Culligan has compiled photos for this briefing.

Your evening briefing is posted at 6 p.m. EST.

Want to catch up on past briefings? You can browse them here.

What did you like What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.

here is today’s mini-crosswords and Spelling. If you are in the mood to play more, find all our games here.


Source link

]]>
12 things our detractors are looking forward to in 2022 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/12-things-our-detractors-are-looking-forward-to-in-2022/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:43:16 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/12-things-our-detractors-are-looking-forward-to-in-2022/ As a new year begins (again), our reviews spotlight the television, movies, music, art, theater, dance, and comedy that promise welcome distraction. Marguerite Lyon The end of “Better Call Saul” I’ll be sad forever when “You better call Saul” is over, so part of me is actually dreading the sixth and final season. I never […]]]>

As a new year begins (again), our reviews spotlight the television, movies, music, art, theater, dance, and comedy that promise welcome distraction.


Marguerite Lyon

I’ll be sad forever when “You better call Saul” is over, so part of me is actually dreading the sixth and final season. I never want to say goodbye to Jimmy or Kim – but man, I’m dying to see them again. By the time “Saul” returns to AMC this spring, it will have been on hiatus for a full two years. (Bob odenkirk, her star, has recovered from a heart attack that occurred on set this year. most carefully woven in our time. Of course, thanks to “Breaking Bad,” we know exactly where some of these characters are heading, but not how they get there, what they think about it, or who they’ll hurt along the way. Come back soon! But also, take it slow.

OK, so yeah, it was weird that my friends Sherri-Ann and Amber and I were the only black people in the movies when we saw the movie “Downton Abbey” in 2019. At the time, we agreed that despite the lack of a colored world in the theater and on screen, we have always found pleasure in the grandeur – the clothing, the castle, the cast of the characters, especially the Dowager Countess of Grantham, Violet Crawley, wonderfully played. by Dame Maggie Smith. Now that we have set our calendars for March 18, 2022, for the rest, “Downton Abbey: a new era,“I can’t wait to see how the franchise tries to reinvent itself on the dawn of a new era, the 1930s, and how it performs in the current racial moment. (A black woman’s face appears in a trailer.) Partly in the south of France after the Dowager Countess learns she inherited a villa there, the film sends the Crawley clan upstairs and their employees downstairs on another adventure, with another marriage. While Julian Fellowes, the creator of “Downton,” has a new show, “The Gilded Age,” which premiered on HBO in January – which appears to be a bit more thoughtful in its approach to race, class and status. identity – here’s hoping that the sequel to ‘Downton’ bows out in the grand Grantham style.


Jane Wagner’s 1985 play “Searching for signs of intelligent life in the universe”Was tailor-made for chameleon gifts from his life partner (and, later, his wife), Lily Tomlin. Who else could have inhabited her 12 very distinct characters – including a runaway punk, a bored 1%, and a trio of disillusioned feminists – with such sardonic sympathy? When Tomlin won a Tony Award in 1986 for his work, it seemed to seal the idea that the performer and the play were one forever. But in the kind of casting that makes your head smack with pleasure, Cecily strong takes on Tomlin’s mantle in a Leigh Silverman-directed revival at the Hangar, which is scheduled to open on Jan.11. Strong – whose “Saturday Night Live” characters include Jeanine Pirro, the girl you wished you had struck up a conversation with Party and, more recently, Goober the clown who had an abortion when she was 23 – appears be another custom fit, almost four decades later.


Jon Pareles

Emerging from its own history as a stronghold of Western classical music, Carnegie Hall will be the hub of a city-wide multidisciplinary festival of Afrofuturism: the visionary and technophile ways in which the culture of the African diaspora has imagined alternative paths. The Carnegie series is set to begin on February 12 with the fast-paced and sometimes mind-blowing electronic musician Flying Lotus. (A challenge could be the acoustics of the main hall.) Performances at Zankel Hall include the Sun Ra Arkestra’s galactic jazz with cellist and singer Kelsey Lu and insurgent Moor Mother (February 17); flautist Nicole Mitchell at the helm of her Black Earth Ensemble; and clarinetist Angel Bat Dawid with his Autophysiopsychic Millennium (February 24); African-born hip-hop duo Chimurenga Renaissance and Malian composer Fatoumata Diawara (March 4); and DJ, composer and techno pioneer Carl Craig at the helm of his Synthesizer Ensemble (March 19). There is much more: five dozen other cultural organizations will organize festivals.


Anthony Tommasini

“Don Carlos” by Verdi may not be a flawless opera. But it is deep work; I consider it to be Verdi’s “Hamlet”. Written for the Paris Opera, it gave a nod to the grand French style and included epic scenes and choirs en masse. But when it premiered in 1867, it was deemed too long and ineffective. Verdi revised the opera several times, making cuts, translating the French libretto into Italian, leaving a confused legacy of revisions. the Metropolitan opera gives the audience the chance to hear the work as it was originally conceived in its French version in five acts, which many consider to be the best. Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who has directed some superb Met performances of the Italian adaptation, will be in that pit for this new production by David McVicar. The star-studded cast, led by tenor Matthew Polenzani in the title role, includes Sonya Yoncheva, Elina Garanca, Etienne Dupuis, Eric Owens and John Relyea. When performances begin on February 28, prepare for a five-hour show with two intermissions; I can not wait.


Mike hale

This winter brings more than the usual number of big stars taking time out for the small screen, like Uma Thurman (“Suspicion”), Christopher Walken (“Severance”) and Samuel L. Jackson (“The Last Days of Ptolemy Gray”) . The one that piques my interest the most is Renée Zellweger, assuming only her second leading TV role in “The thing about Pam, Which airs March 8 on NBC. Zellweger may be hit and miss, but her hits – “The Whole Wide World”, “Chicago”, “Judy” – keep her at the forefront of American actresses. Here, she plays Pam Hupp, who is involved in multiple deaths and is currently serving a life sentence for one of them, in a real-crime miniseries that showrunner Jenny Klein produced. solid TV offerings like “The Witcher”. and “Jessica Jones”.


Jason farago

When the Museum of Modern Art opened its expanded home in 2019, its most important Picasso suddenly found itself with a new companion: a tumultuous panoramic painting of American violence that Gold Faith Ring painted 1967. Ringgold, born 91 years ago in Harlem, has never been an obscure figure: her art has been exhibited in the Clinton White House as well as in most New York museums; his children’s books have won awards and reached bestseller lists. But she had to wait too long for a retrospective of her career in her hometown. The one at the New Museum, which opens on February 17, will reveal how Ringgold intertwined the political and the personal: first in his rigorously composed “American People” paintings, which channeled the civil rights movement into grid, repetitive, and syncopated forms; then in “history quilts” in reconstituted fabric representing Michael Jackson or Aunt Jemima, and geometric abstractions inspired by Tibetan silks and embroidery. The show is accompanied by a major chance to rediscover: the first release in more than two decades of its “French Collection”, a cycle of 12 quilts which reconstructs the history of Paris in the 1920s through the eyes of a fictional African-American artist and model. .


Maya phillips

Robert eggers has only directed two feature films, and yet he is already known as a director of beautifully weird and critically acclaimed films. “The Witch”, from 2016, was followed three years later by the sinister and confusing “The Lighthouse”. Both established Eggers as a stylistic descendant of the Brothers Grimm, a maker of macabre fables that descend in torrents of madness. That’s why I can’t wait to see his third feature film, “The man of the North“, which premieres on April 22, about a Viking prince seeking revenge on his murdered father. Infused with Icelandic mythology, the story is based on Amleth’s story, the inspiration of Prince Hamlet, my favorite sad boy in English literature. Eggers wrote the screenplay with Icelandic poet Sjón, so we can certainly expect an epic with epic writing to match. There is also a stellar cast, including Alexander Skarsgård, Nicole Kidman, Ethan Hawke, Anya Taylor-Joy, Willem Dafoe – and Björk as a witch. I’d watch this on my own.


Gia Kourlas

Four quartets», An ambitious one-night work by the modern choreographer Pam tanowitz, lands at the Brooklyn Academy of Music next month (February 10-12), barring a Covid cancellation. Based on poems by TS Eliot, the production includes live narration by actress Kathleen Chalfant, music by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho and set by Brice Marden; Tanowitz continues his exploration of the relationship between emotion and form.


Isabelle Herrera

Diaristic and quietly intense, Saba, a rapper from Chicago, is the kind of artist who mourns with heartwarming calm. In 2018, his record “Care for Me” tackled this theme the day after the murder of his cousin and collaborator, stabbed to death a year earlier. Released on February 4, his next album, “Few good things, ”Confronts life’s equally devastating challenges: the anxiety of generational poverty and the depths of survivor guilt. It takes up the undulating and poetic flows of Saba, which exude a deep sense of storytelling. The beats are always buttery, jazzed up and meticulously arranged. But this time around, there’s more wisdom – a recognition that going through trauma means finding gratitude and affirmation when you can.


Jason zinoman

“Quarter-Life Special”, the first special stand-up of Taylor tomlinson, presented a young artist with real potential. Tomlinson spoke forcefully about a clear character (happy but not the life of the party; rather, as she put it, “the weak pulse of the bribe”) and told jokes marked by a diverse arsenal of ‘acts and ways of distracting. She’s covered standard territory (dating, sex, parents, kids) with enough insight and dark undertones to grab your attention. More excitingly, every now and then she would let her thought process fly in unexpected delusional directions, like the story that led her to imagine a police-led sadness test. “Instead of a breathalyzer,” she explained, “they make you sigh in a harmonica.” This Netflix special caused a stir, but it probably would have been bigger if it hadn’t been released in March 2020. A pandemic later, she has another hour ready and another Netflix special on the way. She is now playing it on tour, which is slated to stop in New York in January at Town Hall and then at the Beacon Theater.


Source link

]]>
Today in History – The Boston Globe https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/today-in-history-the-boston-globe/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 05:03:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/today-in-history-the-boston-globe/ In 1788 Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the US Constitution. In 1811, Senator Timothy Pickering, a federalist from Massachusetts, became the first member of the United States Senate to be censored after improperly revealing the contents of an executive document. In 1900, US Secretary of State John Hay announced the “open door policy” […]]]>

In 1788 Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the US Constitution.

In 1811, Senator Timothy Pickering, a federalist from Massachusetts, became the first member of the United States Senate to be censored after improperly revealing the contents of an executive document.

In 1900, US Secretary of State John Hay announced the “open door policy” to facilitate trade with China.

In 1929, the United States and Canada reached an agreement on joint action to preserve Niagara Falls.

In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by Japanese forces during World War II.

In 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts successfully launched his candidacy for the presidency.

In 1967, Republican Ronald Reagan was sworn in as the new governor of California in a ceremony held in Sacramento shortly after midnight.

In 1971, 66 people were killed in a pile-up of spectators leaving a football match at Ibrox Stadium in Glasgow, Scotland.

In 1974, President Richard Nixon signed a law requiring states to limit highway speeds to 55 miles per hour in order to save gasoline in the face of an OPEC oil embargo. (The 55 mph limit was effectively removed in 1987; federal speed limits were abolished in 1995.)

In 2007, the state funeral for former President Gerald R. Ford began with an elaborate service at the Washington National Cathedral and then moved to Grand Rapids, Michigan.

In 2012, Gordon Hirabayashi, a Japanese-American sociologist who spent 90 days in prison for refusing to be interned during World War II, died in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada at the age of 93. (Hirabayashi’s conviction was overturned in 1987 by a US court which found that the US government’s internment policies were based on political expediency, not national security risk.)

In 2015, California began issuing driver’s licenses to immigrants who were in the country illegally. Little Jimmy Dickens, a short singer-songwriter who was the oldest member of the Grand Ole Opry cast, has died at the age of 94.

In 2016, a heavily armed group led by Ammon and Ryan Bundy seized the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, starting a 41-day standoff to protest the imprisonment of two ranchers convicted of setting fires on public lands and to demand the return of the federal government. public land under local control.

In 2017, a suicide bomber driving an explosives-laden van hit a bustling market in Baghdad, killing at least 36 people in an attack claimed by the Islamic State group hours after French President Francois Hollande arrived in the capital Iraqi.

In 2018, Senator Al Franken officially resigned from the Senate a month after the Democrat of Minnesota announced his intention to leave Congress amid a series of allegations of sexual misconduct. NBC News has announced that Hoda Kotb will co-host the first two hours of “Today”, replacing Matt Lauer after his dismissal over allegations of sexual misconduct.

In 2021, in a phone call with Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State, President Donald Trump pressured Brad Raffensperger to “find” enough votes to undo Joe Biden’s victory in the state. , repeatedly citing refuted fraud allegations; In a recording of the conversation, Trump was heard raising the prospect of a “criminal offense” if officials did not change the vote count. Joining Trump’s efforts to overturn the election, eleven Republican and elected senators said they would vote against some state voters on January 6 unless Congress appoints a commission to verify the results. International inspectors have said Iran plans to enrich uranium up to 20% in an underground nuclear facility; Iran’s program would then be a technical step away from weapons quality levels. Paul Westphal, a Hall of Fame basketball player who won a championship with the Boston Celtics in 1974 and later coached in the league and in college, has died in Arizona at the age of 70.


Source link

]]>
The “hottest end of the year on record in France” – good for sun worshipers, bad for skiers https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-hottest-end-of-the-year-on-record-in-france-good-for-sun-worshipers-bad-for-skiers/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:08:26 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-hottest-end-of-the-year-on-record-in-france-good-for-sun-worshipers-bad-for-skiers/ France is experiencing its warmest end of the year on record, with temperatures 10 degrees above average in some regions, according to forecasts by the national meteorological service Météo France. The people of Bordeaux take advantage of the good weather, as the period between Christmas and New Year’s Day is expected to be the hottest […]]]>

France is experiencing its warmest end of the year on record, with temperatures 10 degrees above average in some regions, according to forecasts by the national meteorological service Météo France.

The people of Bordeaux take advantage of the good weather, as the period between Christmas and New Year’s Day is expected to be the hottest in the country’s history.

“The weather is nice, good and warm. We take advantage of the good weather, ”says a resident.

Between Wednesday and Thursday, records were even broken north of the Seine, with temperatures reaching 15 ° C to 17 ° C.

“It’s been a great week,” said one man. “People are out there and despite everything that is going on, people are making the most of it.”

Meanwhile, in Switzerland, the mild weather threatens to spoil an excellent start to the ski season.

One of those affected resorts is Grindelwald, located at an altitude of 1,034 meters above sea level, where snow was replaced by rain this week.

“It’s not so good. Everything is quite wet. But we are making the most of it. Now we are here and there is still some snow,” shared Marco Zengg, a skier.

As the number of skiers fell, some other low-lying resorts had to close completely over Christmas.

The situation will become even more complicated by the end of the week, with temperatures of 10 ° C-15 ° C forecast at 1,000 meters.

The mild weather also increased the risk of avalanches in the French department de Savoie, with a risk of 4 on a scale of 5.

Claude Schneider, ski patroller-rescuer in La Plagne, observes the snow cover several times a day, and heavy rains worry him.

“You should know that fresh, light snow, in very good condition, weighs around 40 to 50 kilos per cubic meter, and at the time of the 1 hour reading, it weighed 250 kilos per cubic meter. It is therefore heavy and the heavier it is, the less it will hold on the slopes, which is very bad for the risk of avalanches, ”he explained.

Higher up, it was snowing more than 50 centimeters in some places and it sometimes rained.

Météo France forecasts a return of the sun for the next few days, with less rain, but more very mild temperatures.

According to environmentalists, a succession of warmer winters is likely a direct impact of climate change.

Watch the full report in the video player above.


Source link

]]>
Natural History Museum identifies more than 500 new species in 2021 | Natural History Museum https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/natural-history-museum-identifies-more-than-500-new-species-in-2021-natural-history-museum/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 00:01:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/natural-history-museum-identifies-more-than-500-new-species-in-2021-natural-history-museum/ Six new dinosaurs, an Indian beetle named after Larry the cat, and dozens of crustaceans essential to the planet’s carbon cycle were among 552 new species identified by scientists at the Natural History Museum this year. In 2021, researchers described previously unknown species through the Tree of Life, of a pair of giant carnivorous dinosaurs […]]]>

Six new dinosaurs, an Indian beetle named after Larry the cat, and dozens of crustaceans essential to the planet’s carbon cycle were among 552 new species identified by scientists at the Natural History Museum this year.

In 2021, researchers described previously unknown species through the Tree of Life, of a pair of giant carnivorous dinosaurs known as spinosaurs – nicknamed the “river hunter” and “hell heron”. – to five new snakes that include Joseph’s runner, which was identified using an 185-year-old painting.

With limited international travel to the field sites, scientists at the London Museum focused on describing the existing collections and species that roamed the Earth millions of years ago.

Two newly described spinosaur dinosaur species discovered on the Isle of Wight, named ‘Hell Heron’ and ‘Bank Hunter’. Photography: Anthony Hutchings

“It’s been a fantastic year for describing new dinosaurs, especially from the UK,” said Dr Susannah Maidment, senior palaeobiology researcher at the museum, who helped describe some of the new findings. “Although we have known about the UK’s dinosaur heritage for over 150 years, the application of new techniques and data from around the world is helping us uncover a hidden diversity of British dinosaurs.”

Spinosaurs were among four species of British dinosaurs described by researchers alongside a new, unusually snouted iguanodontian from the Isle of Wight, and Pendraig milnerae, the oldest known carnivorous dinosaur in the UK.

More than half of the new species identified at the museum this year were copepods, small shrimp-like creatures found in salt and freshwater. They make up a large portion of the zooplankton on which krill, fish and other invertebrates feed, playing a vital role in the ecology and carbon cycle of the planet.

Due to their abundance, copepods are among the oceans’ greatest carbon sinks. Scientists have described 291 species this year, many of which come from a collection created over six decades by French researchers Claude and Françoise Monniot.

“Copepods are not only free, but many are parasites, and they can be found living in virtually every other major group of animals,” said Professor Geoff Boxshall, a researcher in the museum’s department of life sciences. who identified the crustaceans with a South Korean. colleague, Il-Hoi Kim.

“The huge Monniot collection has been made available to Il-Hoi Kim and myself, and since we are both recently retired, we theoretically had time to finally browse it. However, the collection was so huge it was somewhat intimidating – but then Covid-19 came along and the completion of the article series became my lockdown project. “

Impatiens versicolor, a new species of gemweed or touch-me-nots, discovered in East Africa in 2021
Impatiens versicolor, a new species of gemweed or touch-me-not, discovered in East Africa. Photography: Eberhard Fischer

Other newly identified species included 52 wasps, 13 moths, seven crabs, six flies, and five amphipods. Beetles were very present, as they did in 2020, with 90 new species described. They included a pair of purple and green metallic beetles from India, a monochrome beetle with a large pair of Philippine jaws, and a swamp-loving beetle named in honor of Larry the Cat, the Mouse of Downing Street.

A new Southeast Asian bush cricket, known for its song even before the animal was ever seen, was ultimately determined to be a species found in Singapore – now known as Mecopoda simonodoi – a copy of which has been in the museum since 1984.

Five new species of plants from East Africa have been identified: known as Jewelweeds or touch-me-nots, they usually produce delicate pink or white flowers, with the exception of a few species that have moved on to red flowers to attract birds rather than butterflies for pollination.

In addition to plants, eight new species of algae, six parasitic worms and three diatoms – unicellular algae – have been identified.

Find more coverage on the Age of Extinction here and follow the biodiversity journalists Phoebe weston and Patrick greenfield on Twitter for all the latest news and features



Source link

]]>