French history – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 13:45:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-43.png French history – Chateau De Villesavin 41 http://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/ 32 32 Camavinga: “Playing the 2022 World Cup is a goal for me” https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/camavinga-playing-the-2022-world-cup-is-a-goal-for-me/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/camavinga-playing-the-2022-world-cup-is-a-goal-for-me/#respond Sun, 26 Sep 2021 10:05:22 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/camavinga-playing-the-2022-world-cup-is-a-goal-for-me/ Real Madrid midfielder Eduardo Camavinga, who was signed by La Liga giants Rennes in the summer transfer window, spoke on the popular French Sunday morning TV show Telefoot and explained how his move happened, what he hopes to achieve with Madrid this season and his aspirations with France alongside his teammate Karim Benzema. “When I […]]]>

Real Madrid midfielder Eduardo Camavinga, who was signed by La Liga giants Rennes in the summer transfer window, spoke on the popular French Sunday morning TV show Telefoot and explained how his move happened, what he hopes to achieve with Madrid this season and his aspirations with France alongside his teammate Karim Benzema.

When I heard that Real Madrid were following me and were ready to make an offer to sign me, I did not hesitate for a moment. These are things you can’t drag your feet on, ”the 18-year-old said. Telefoot. “Rennes has always been my team; I watch all their matches in Ligue 1. It’s true I could have stayed in Rennes, they will always be in my heart and I will never forget them. I’ll be back at the stadium soon to see all my friends there.

Camavinga: “I never thought I would score when I started out”

Camavinga is released in the squad under Carlo Ancelotti, who has played 151 league minutes in four matches so far, but found the net in his Madrid debut, a dream start to his career at the Bernabéu. “When I’m on the pitch I want to help the team. I was not directly involved if you look at the goal, I was on the right and I took advantage of the rebound to score. At first I didn’t celebrate because I never thought I would score when I started. First I looked at the referee, then everything went crazy.

Speaking of his first impressions in Madrid, Camavinga singled out his international teammate Karim Benzema for his praise and the intensity of the workouts. “The technical quality and the training are what struck me the most when I arrived. The first day I was tired after the first session but I got used to it. Maybe the language was the hardest thing, I like to laugh with everyone and make jokes but I don’t have a good command of Spanish yet. Karim is a leader, we talked a lot and I didn’t really know it but he’s a very funny guy. He gets along well with everyone on the team and he sets an example.

Camavinga aims for a place in the World Cup with the Blues

Camavinga debuted with the Blues a year ago at the age of 17, becoming the third youngest French debutant in history (behind Julien Verbrugghe and Maurice Gastiger) and the youngest since 1914 to represent his country, although he has since returned to the Under-21 after three caps in 2020. “I’m in the best club in the world, it will help me try to come back to the France team., “he said.” Playing the 2022 World Cup is a goal for me. I have to play well here, because my performances with Madrid are what will help me get back into the France team.


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Louisiana Department of Education Approves New Social Studies Curriculum for K-8 Schools https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/louisiana-department-of-education-approves-new-social-studies-curriculum-for-k-8-schools/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/louisiana-department-of-education-approves-new-social-studies-curriculum-for-k-8-schools/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 22:07:02 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/louisiana-department-of-education-approves-new-social-studies-curriculum-for-k-8-schools/ A Louisiana Department of Education steering committee approved on Saturday a new version of the standards for Louisiana students learning social sciences, update content and timeline of what history is taught in public schools. Under the proposed new standards, students in Kindergarten to Grade 2 will learn Louisiana and world history at an introductory level. […]]]>

A Louisiana Department of Education steering committee approved on Saturday a new version of the standards for Louisiana students learning social sciences, update content and timeline of what history is taught in public schools.

Under the proposed new standards, students in Kindergarten to Grade 2 will learn Louisiana and world history at an introductory level.

In Grade 1, students will “describe democratic principles, including, but not limited to, equality, liberty, liberty and respect for individual rights”.

Students in grades three to five will be taught extensively about world history, as well as “the ingenuous history of Louisiana and the first French explorations and colonizations”.

“The goal was to develop knowledge chronologically and systematically, from prehistoric times to AD 1600,” said Nathan Corley, director of special projects at the Louisiana Department of Education.

Students in grades six to eight will learn the history of the United States and Louisiana in tandem.

In seventh grade, students will be expected to explain the causes and effects of 19th century events such as civil war and reconstruction.

In eighth grade, students will also be expected to analyze the civil rights movement in the context of Jim Crow and the entry of the United States into World War II and events in Europe.

The new standards have generated great interest from the Louisiana Legislature. Lawmakers during this year’s legislative session proposed several bills requiring changes to the social studies curriculum in public schools as conservative concerns about critical race theory swept across the country.

Rep. Ray Garofalo, R-Chalmette, introduced a bill that would have banned classes on systemic racism or sexism currently in the state or country.

Garofalo ended up being dismissed as chairman of the House Education Committee after saying schools should teach “the good, the bad and the ugly” of slavery.

None of the bills that would have made it harder for teachers on slavery or sexism – including Garofalo’s – have reached the governor’s office.

But the merits of Critical Race Theory – a framework used to demonstrate how racism has shaped and continues to shape modern society – have been debated nationally. Former President Donald Trump attacked the idea during his last year in office. His administration issued a memo in September 2020 banning federal agencies from taking anti-bias training that the administration called “divisive anti-American propaganda training sessions.”

President Joe Biden erased Trump’s order on January 20, the day he was inaugurated: “I am rescinding the previous administration’s damaging ban on diversity and sensitivity training,” he said. he declares. “Unity and healing must begin with understanding and truth, not ignorance and lies.”

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Representative Barbara Freiberg, R-Baton Rouge, approved the proposed social studies standards.

“There have been compromises on both sides as to where now people feel comfortable,” said Freiberg, who is white.

But Rep. Tammy Phelps, D-Shreveport, said she was not happy with the social studies proposal. She believes the new standards do not fully address African American history or the contributions of people of color to Louisiana and the United States.

“It’s still very vague when I think we should be specific when we talk about history,” said Phelps, who is black.

The new standards will be submitted to the House Education Committee on October 11 for discussion. Freiberg and Phelps are both members of the education committee.

“It will be interesting when (the new standards) are presented to the (house) education committee to see if there are people who are still having problems,” Freiberg said.

Parents and teachers can submit public comments online to the Council for Primary and Secondary Education on the new standards. In December, the board will then consider the revised standards, along with public comments.

If the revised standards are approved, they will be implemented by the 2023-24 school year in Louisiana public schools.


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The Anglosphere is just a cover for the old idea of ​​white superiority | Kenan malik https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-anglosphere-is-just-a-cover-for-the-old-idea-of-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bwhite-superiority-kenan-malik/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-anglosphere-is-just-a-cover-for-the-old-idea-of-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bwhite-superiority-kenan-malik/#respond Sat, 25 Sep 2021 14:18:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/the-anglosphere-is-just-a-cover-for-the-old-idea-of-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bwhite-superiority-kenan-malik/ ‘A people lazily sipping his cognac on the boulevards as he takes an insignificant part in the human comedy, “Franklin Giddings, professor of sociology at Columbia University, scorned with contempt in 1900,” can only go into the struggle for existence with men who have learned that happiness … is the satisfaction that comes only with […]]]>

‘A people lazily sipping his cognac on the boulevards as he takes an insignificant part in the human comedy, “Franklin Giddings, professor of sociology at Columbia University, scorned with contempt in 1900,” can only go into the struggle for existence with men who have learned that happiness … is the satisfaction that comes only with the tingling of blood. The tingling blood was Anglo-Saxon. “The greatest question of the twentieth century,” Giddings believed, was “whether the Anglo-Saxon or the Slav should imprint his civilization on the world.”

A century later, it is not the Anglo-Saxon which is rising up against the Slav, but the West against China. Nonetheless, as the fallout from the Aukus Accord reveals, something of French contempt remains on both sides of the Atlantic, as does the sentiment of what Giddings called “Anglo-superiority.” Saxons ”, although today many prefer to speak of“ the Anglosphere ”. France, suggested conservative lord Daniel Hannan, is “not a reliable partner”, so “allies of the Anglosphere” have taken “the responsibility of defending freedom”, demonstrating that “there are still adults patrolling the playground “.

In recent years, the Anglosphere has become a staple concept for a certain stream of right-wing Eurosceptics, helping them redefine British identity in the post-Brexit world. For Nigel Farage, Aukus is “the Brexiteers dream” because “our best friends in the world speak English”.

As a word, “Anglosphere” is relatively new, coined by Neal Stephenson in his 1995 science fiction novel. The diamond age. As a concept, however, its roots go back to 19th-century notions of Anglo-Saxon racial grandeur, cultivated by figures as diverse as American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson and English historian JR Seeley. What links the old Anglo-Saxon to contemporary Anglosphere ideas, advanced by enthusiasts like Hannan and historian Robert Conquest, is a vision of English as a unique culture, the one that “invented the freedom “.

It is a vision which, in its understanding of language, culture and history, draws heavily on German Romantic philosophy, in particular Johann Gottfried Herder’s notion of the Volksgeist, the spirit of a people carried through history. In every language, writes Herder, dwells “the whole world of tradition, of history, of principles of existence: all its heart and all its soul.” Hannan also maintains that the tribes who settled in England in the 5th century brought with them “the seed of … Anglo-Saxon freedoms” and provided “a direct link between the English language and the distinctive political system of the Anglosphere” .

It is a story of how freedoms were earned that does serious damage to history. The role of the British and the British in the development of freedom and equality has been complex and contradictory.

The English philosopher John Locke is seen, not only by supporters of the Anglosphere, as a founder of liberalism and notions of tolerance. He was also a shareholder in the Royal African Company, which supplied African slaves to the English colonies. His Two government treaties argued that “all men are inherently equal” while upholding the legitimacy of slavery. Locke’s view that Catholics should be denied rights shaped English law for two centuries.

Meanwhile, continental thinkers, especially those in the radical Enlightenment tradition, offered broader visions of freedom. The law, insisted the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, unlike Locke, should not restrict beliefs but allow everyone “to think what he wants and to say what he thinks”. French philosopher Denis Diderot was vehement in his opposition to slavery and colonialism. It was through the French Revolution that the “declaration of the rights of man and of the citizen” was enunciated, becoming since then at the center of the struggles for freedoms.

Neither the British nor the French (nor the Americans) allowed their love of freedom to hinder the practice of slavery. It was not Britain, as many claim, that first ended slavery, but a slave insurrection on the island of Santo Domingo (now Haiti) in 1791 which not only resulted in emancipation, but forced the French to formally abolish servitude. The British response? Invade Santo Domingo in a (failed) attempt to restore slavery and prevent the emancipation virus from spreading to the British colonies. Forty years later, Britain finally passed its own Slavery Abolition Act.

Those who fought for their freedoms were treated brutally by the British. A preferred way of dealing with the rebels of the “Indian Mutiny” was to whip them with cannons and detonate them. Lieutenant George Cracklow wrote to his mother that he thought “no more of blowing up half a dozen mutineers before breakfast than I was of eating the same meal.”

This is not to say that British thinkers and movements did not play an important role in forging the traditions of freedom. From Thomas Paine to Mary Wollstonecraft, from suffragists to the Red Clydesiders, many have fueled these struggles. The story, however, is much more complex than defenders of the Anglosphere would like to acknowledge. It is only by reducing freedom to the notions of “free market”, “small government” and “common law” that one could imagine the idea of ​​the Anglosphere as the main source of freedom.

Even with this laughably restricted notion of freedom, the argument for a distinct Anglosphere political culture does not hold water. Take the issue of freedom of speech, fundamental to any discussion of freedom. British law is (unfortunately) more aligned with EU law than with the US First Amendment (which itself is inspired more by the spirit of Spinoza than Locke). British welfare and health policies are also (thankfully) closer to those of European nations than to those of America, free market doctrines of recent decades notwithstanding. Australia’s Covid policies have hardly been rooted in defending freedoms. New Zealand, distancing itself from the “Five Eyes” security policy towards China, does not speak of a common Anglosphere vision either.

The irony, as Linda Colley observed, is that “the cult of superior British freedom has often been deployed to support and maintain the political status quo”. Radicals have often appealed to old freedoms, real and imagined, to underpin new struggles for freedoms. The authorities, however, used these same stories “to promote a version of freedom that would be fully compatible with property, hierarchy and law-abiding moderation.” From Peterloo to Orgreave, the laws and traditions celebrated by Anglosphere devotees have often been used to quell radical dissent. As we struggle against what Britishness means in the contemporary world, we must beware of the distorted stories of freedoms and freedoms deployed to restrain today’s struggles for freedoms and freedoms.

Kenan Malik is an Observer columnist


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Politics This Week | The Economist https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/politics-this-week-the-economist/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/politics-this-week-the-economist/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 20:44:06 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/politics-this-week-the-economist/ Sep 25, 2021 Listen to this story Your browser does not support the item . Enjoy more audio and podcasts on ios Where Android. France has reacted with fury to American, Australian and British plans to form a new defense pact in the Pacific. France was not invited to join. Australia is also canceling a […]]]>
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France has reacted with fury to American, Australian and British plans to form a new defense pact in the Pacific. France was not invited to join. Australia is also canceling a contract for French diesel-powered submarines in favor of American (or possibly British) nuclear-powered submarines. Jean-Yves Le Drian, the French Foreign Minister, called it a “stab in the back”, and withdrew his ambassadors from Washington and Canberra, although the French Ambassador to America is now fired following a catch-up call between Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron.

Germans was preparing to vote in the legislative elections of September 26 which will mark the end of 16 years in power for Angela Merkel, who is stepping down. The polls have tightened slightly, but the Social Democrats are still ahead of Merkel’s Christian Democrats.

In Russia, the Duma elections produced another qualified majority for United Russia, the pro-Putin party through which the Kremlin exercises legislative power. The election was widely viewed as rigged. But few Russians took to the streets to protest, unlike 2011, when thousands did.

from China President Xi Jinping has said he will stop supporting new coal-fired power plant projects abroad. By some estimates, 70% of all coal-fired power plants under construction today involve Chinese government funding, but China’s interest in dirty electricity has cooled as the price of the renewable type has fallen.

China asked to join 11-country Asia-Pacific region commercial agreement known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. Taiwan has also asked to join.

Hong Kong held a vote for a new 1,500-member electoral committee, which will choose the city’s next leader. It was the first after the reforms which require candidates to be “patriotic”, that is to say friendly with the Chinese Communist Party. The electorate was limited to less than 5,000 people. Only one critic of the government won a seat.

The results of an early election in Canada disappointing for Justin Trudeau, the Prime Minister. Although Mr. Trudeau won enough votes to govern for a third term, he remains at the head of a minority government, with about the same number of seats as when he called the election.

Another Trumpian turn

Speaking at the UN General Assembly Jair Bolsonaro, President of Brazil, affirmed to represent “a new Brazil, with its newfound credibility in the eyes of the world ”. He also spent part of the speech touting the unproven cures for covid-19 and denouncing the lockdown measures.

The U.S. Border Patrol began to withdraw the 15,000 Haitian migrants who had gathered on a bridge in Texas after crossing the Mexican border. Hundreds of people were immediately deported to Haiti. The migrants had come from South America.

The State Department said the annual cap of refugees licenses in the United States will drop from 62,500 to 125,000, in accordance with a campaign pledge from President Joe Biden.

Mr Biden has doubled the number of covid-19s vaccines that America gives developing countries to the tune of a billion, which Pfizer provides without any profit. Before António Guterres’ announcement, the UN secretary general, described as “obscenity” the unequal distribution of vaccines between rich and poor countries. U.S. drug regulator approved booster injections Pfizer vaccine for those over 65.

India said it would resume exporting vaccines. The Serum Institute of India is a major manufacturer of AstraZeneca shot which is used in many poor countries. India had halted exports when it was hit by a devastating wave of infections in April.

Rodrigo Duterte, President of the Philippines, said people would be held responsible for any illegal killings in the country’s war on drugs. His detractors say he encouraged such killings. The International Criminal Court has opened an investigation into his drug campaign. Mr. Duterte did not mention the CPI by name, but he appeared to reject his jurisdiction over his country.

Paul Rusesabagina, whose bravery in saving more than 1,200 people during the genocide of Rwanda inspired by the film “Hotel Rwanda”, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for terrorism. Observers called the trial a sham. Mr. Rusesabagina is a critic of Paul Kagame, the president of Rwanda.

Authorities in Sudan foiled a coup attempt against a transitional government that was itself installed in a coup in 2019. Forces loyal to the overthrown Sudanese dictator, Omar al-Bashir, have been blamed.

Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria from 1999 to 2019, died at the age of 84. He pulled the country out of a ruinous civil war, but was ousted in 2019 amid mass protests against his decision to run for a fifth term.

Take out the welcome mat

The White House said restrictions on travelers entering the United States that was introduced at the start of the pandemic would be waived in November, for people who were fully vaccinated. The restrictions, which in fact banned most passengers from Europe, China, India and a handful of other countries, had been criticized as irrational. A negative covid test will always be required, as is the norm everywhere.

Australia is also ready to reopen its international borders in December, if its national vaccination rate reaches 80%. It sealed its border 18 months ago, more tightly than almost any other country. Australians will again be allowed to leave without special permission and visitors will be allowed entry. Thailand, which reopened tourist hot spots, aims to reopen Bangkok and other cities in November.

Protests against vaccination warrants turned into three days of riots in Melbourne. The Australian city has been subject to varying degrees of lockdown since the outbreak began and subject to labyrinthine rules. He also suffered an earthquake this week.

This article appeared in the The World This Week section of the print edition under the headline “Politics This Week”


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Tom Keneally’s Corporal Hitler’s Pistol Review – An Exciting Historical Thriller | Books https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/tom-keneallys-corporal-hitlers-pistol-review-an-exciting-historical-thriller-books/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/tom-keneallys-corporal-hitlers-pistol-review-an-exciting-historical-thriller-books/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 17:31:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/tom-keneallys-corporal-hitlers-pistol-review-an-exciting-historical-thriller-books/ WHen Tom Keneally chose Corporal Hitler’s pistol-loaded title, he would have been well aware of Chekhov’s advice to writers that if a gun appears in the first act, it should be fired in the second. Indeed, he shoots his fictional pistol several times for dramatic effect in his 35th novel, a fascinating blend of historical […]]]>

WHen Tom Keneally chose Corporal Hitler’s pistol-loaded title, he would have been well aware of Chekhov’s advice to writers that if a gun appears in the first act, it should be fired in the second. Indeed, he shoots his fictional pistol several times for dramatic effect in his 35th novel, a fascinating blend of historical crime thriller and intricate portrayal of a rural Australian community.

The weapon has been lurking in Keneally’s imagination since the first act of his own life. Her father, who served in the Middle East during WWII, sent home memorabilia, including a German Luger holster (not the pistol itself), which Keneally can always show visitors.

Nazi Germany and the World Wars inspired many of his rich tales, including the Booker Prize-winning Schindler’s Arch. Corporal Hitler’s pistol is found in the unstable peace between the wars, when post-traumatic pain collided with the Great Depression and escalating tensions. The Japanese occupation of Manchuria leads a young man to speculate: “I hope I’m wrong. But could we witness the opening of a Second Great War? “

The action is set in 1933, two years before Keneally was born, in the town of Kempsey on the north coast of New South Wales, where he spent his early childhood. He is inspired by experience and folklore, like an old German-Australian who owned a pistol that belonged to Hitler.

His familiarity with the city makes Kempsey crackle with commerce, gossip, and class divisions from the very first pages. Wealthy Flo Honeywood walks the streets, spots other characters, and prepares to confront her husband, the respected master builder, over an Aboriginal boy from the camp outside of town who looks like him.

Always a first-rate storyteller of a traditional genre, Keneally displays his mastery of the narrative technique in a series of cinematic sets that propel the story while intimately developing the characters. Some take place at the Victoria Theater, the hub of social life, where Hollywood movies add glamor and dreams to ordinary lives.

Young Gertie Webber speaks with the exaggeration of an actor, and her brother Christian imagines dressing his mother “like Marlene Dietrich in Shanghai Express”. The Victoria simmers with the repressed eroticism of the novel. At a screening of Tabu, “Harper Quinlan, the projectionist, said you could hear the boys’ fly buttons popping all over the theater.”

Chicken Dalton, the “effeminate and stylish” pianist who accompanies the Saturday night images, is the most theatrical of a living ensemble. It sounds like a Dickensian dandy but is based on a true resident of the time and represents Keneally’s tribute to the gay men of his youth.

“Kempsey’s Thought” finds sexual company with locked up homosexuals whose secrets are doomed to explode. Keneally inhabits cheerful, female and native characters with confidence and complexity, all observed in compelling detail, from their fashion to their fears and desires.

A glimmer of social change begins with Flo Honeywood’s rebellion against her husband, which leads her to unexpected bonds with Chicken and with Aboriginal boy, Eddie Kelly. Her encounter with a group of Thunguddi women in the Refreshment Rooms of Tsiros is an intricately drawn microcosm of multiracial Australia. But the power of power and prejudice await vulnerable transgressors.

In the other main storyline, Bert Webber, a Lutheran dairy farmer, collapses upon seeing a newsreel about the new German chancellor, “the man with the stupid economic mustache”. Despite his German ancestors, Bert fought with an Australian battalion in France and saw his friend gunned down by a “skinny, mustached” German. The encounter will haunt him and the course of history.

As Bert relives his horror under electroconvulsive therapy and mesmerism, his hapless wife, Anna, fills the void with one of the novel’s steamy sexual adventures. Other intrigues emerge with the mysterious past of Johnny Costigan, the Irishman who runs the Webber farm.

Keneally’s prose is robust (and at times humorous) with the language of Catholicism learned in his youth: “That holy and cursed pistol … the equivalent of the nails that tore the hands of Christ.” “The hallway [of the convent] smelled of varnish and virginity, and Flo thought it wasn’t a bad smell. And in a sexual fellowship, “there was gravity and erections to watch out for.”

Flashbacks to the trench warfare in 1916 and the Irish Civil War in 1922 dramatize the ambiguities of the conflict. Sometimes Keneally the Historian is so eager to share his knowledge that he pushes Keneally the Novelist away and the pace slows down. Yet these dark events are essential for understanding subsequent motivations.

Keneally skillfully braids her disparate strands, far too artful to create predictable results. Nothing goes as planned, even for those with noble intentions, keeping the plot tense until the end. Corporal Hitler’s pistol manages to be cheerful, upbeat entertainment while mourning the human tragedies that shaped the 20th century and beyond.


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A winless French rugby club on the verge of unwanted sporting immortality https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-winless-french-rugby-club-on-the-verge-of-unwanted-sporting-immortality/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-winless-french-rugby-club-on-the-verge-of-unwanted-sporting-immortality/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/a-winless-french-rugby-club-on-the-verge-of-unwanted-sporting-immortality/ It was a long time coming, but all bad things come to an end. The sequence is over. Last Saturday the Worcester Warriors finally won a Premiership match. By beating the London Irish 36-24 at Sixways, Worcester ended an 18-game losing streak in the league, a streak dating back to the corresponding game last November. […]]]>

It was a long time coming, but all bad things come to an end. The sequence is over. Last Saturday the Worcester Warriors finally won a Premiership match.

By beating the London Irish 36-24 at Sixways, Worcester ended an 18-game losing streak in the league, a streak dating back to the corresponding game last November. Amateurs. With the Premiership boxed in now and for the foreseeable future, Worcester had the opportunity to do something incredible and stage a losing streak for centuries, but they threw it all away. And why? Finishing 10th or 11th when history was within their grasp? Pathetic.

If you want to see how it’s really done then you should look over the English Channel to Agen, losers from losers. According to some meticulously researched statistics by (and shamelessly stolen from) my Francophile colleague Charles Richardson, Agen’s wait for the sweet taste of a league win will have reached 583 days by the time they play at Mont de Marsan in ProD2, the second in French rugby. level, Saturday. For context, when they won 30-16 in Brive on February 22, 2020, Covid-19 was firmly housed in the foreign news section of newspapers. Apparently, there were concerns that this could affect the supply chains of Primark and Asos. Fortunately, nothing more happened …

But there is more. Their expectation of a home league victory dates back even further – more than 700 days – to October 19, 2019, when Stade Français were beaten 27-19, when most people would have thought the Wuhan lab was a hip-hop tribute band. It is quite remarkable to trace their form during this period of almost two years. They start the Top 14 season strong. At the start of the 2019-20 season, they beat Brive and cash Montpellier, draw Racing 92 and claim many bonus points. At this point, not only do the wheels begin to come off, but the entire vehicle passes through the median and ignites.

Yet despite this downward spiral, Agen was saved from relegation, with the pandemic curtailing the 2019-2020 campaign. Once the sport resumed in France, their trajectory continued in vertical descent. The final standings were as follows: played 26, lost 26, scored 315, conceded 1101. The only stain on their notebook was two losing bonus points, which prevented them from winning a big zero in the points column, but still stared all kinds. by Top ignominious. 14 records (although that was still a point higher than London Welsh’s 2014-15 Premiership campaign).

Relegation can often allow clubs to press regroup and reset. Work on rebuilding their Armandie Stadium began over the summer, which provided a pretty decent metaphor. However, their new campaign started out exactly the same as the last one. Four games, four defeats, including the newly promoted Bourg-en-Bresse. To make matters worse, Saturday’s opponents, Mont de Marsan, are at the top of the standings.

Located in the heart of rugby southwest France, Agen has a proud history. They have won the French championship eight times and reached the final in 2002. French icon Philippe Sella represented them for 13 years.


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At 75, the Ojai Music Festival remains focused on the future https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/at-75-the-ojai-music-festival-remains-focused-on-the-future/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/at-75-the-ojai-music-festival-remains-focused-on-the-future/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 17:04:29 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/at-75-the-ojai-music-festival-remains-focused-on-the-future/ OJAI, Calif .– The return is a process. It is rarely linear. The Ojai Music Festival, for example, returned September 16-19 to celebrate its 75th anniversary after a long pandemic absence. But there have been setbacks among the returns. Compromises were made to accommodate her move from spring to the last days of summer. An […]]]>

OJAI, Calif .– The return is a process. It is rarely linear.

The Ojai Music Festival, for example, returned September 16-19 to celebrate its 75th anniversary after a long pandemic absence. But there have been setbacks among the returns. Compromises were made to accommodate her move from spring to the last days of summer. An artist has been detained in Spain by travel restrictions. Diligently enforced security measures have slightly hardened the mood of this historic event, a harsh yet relaxing haven for contemporary music nestled in an idyllic valley of deadpan mysticism and sweet Pixie tangerines.

This edition of the festival is the first under the leadership of Ara Guzelimian, back at the helm after a race in the 1990s. Each year, the person in his position organizes the programming with a new musical director; for Guzelimian’s debut, he chose composer John Adams, the paterfamilias of American classical music, who was born in the year of the first festival. Uninterested in a retrospective for this milestone anniversary, they presented their concerts as a prospective survey of young artists, which befits a festival that has long focused on the future.

But in music, the past, present and future always inform each other. Bach and Beethoven haunted new and recent works; pianist Vikingur Olafsson treated Mozart, as he likes to say, as if the ink had just dried on the sheet music. There is no future without looking back.

Guzelimian and Adams looked back as far as they could as they weaved the valley’s Indigenous history into the festival. The cover of her program was the photograph of Cindy Pitou Burton “Ghost Poppy” – the name of the flower given by the Chumash people, the first known inhabitants of this region, who after the arrival of Europeans were almost wiped out by disease. and violence, and who no longer have land in Ojai.

It’s a story that was shared, among lighter stories, by Chumash elder Julie Tumamait-Stenslie, who opened Friday’s lineup with tales about a misty field in Soule Park; that night she started a concert with a blessing.

Despite the best intentions, these were among the highlights of the festival. The predominantly white and wealthy audience responded to details of colonial brutality with an unconsciously affirmative buzz, much as they later applauded Rhiannon Giddens’ “Build a House,” a lightning and radical indictment in American history. – as if these listeners were not involved in his message.

The festival was at its best when the music spoke for itself. (Most concerts are broadcast online.) It must be said, however, that the programming still had its limits; just as this review cannot cover the whole event, the three days of Ojai (and a brief prelude the night before) represented only a fragment of the field and excluded some of the more thorny and more experimental in progress.

Adams was nonetheless interested, it seems, in artists who operate as if they were free from orthodoxy and the genre – far from what he called “the bad old days” of modernism. .

Beyond the composers, this translated to the performers, a roster that included the festival orchestra (not just a pickup band with brilliant violinist Alexi Kenney as first violin); members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group; and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. And soloists like violinist – for one piece, also violist – Miranda Cuckson, who called upon the strength of a complete ensemble in Anthony Cheung’s “Studies of Character” and Dai Fujikura’s “Prism Spectra”, and followed with agility Bach’s Second Partita with “Friezes” in place of the famous Chaconne finale of the partita.

Olafsson, whose recordings demonstrated his genius as a programmer – with a keen ear for connections within the work of a single composer, or across centuries and genres – convincingly moderated a conversation between Rameau, Debussy and Philip Glass, as well as another on Mozart. and his contemporaries, with a masterful voice and enlightening clarity.

Giddens was equally at home in a range of styles, his polymathic musicality and chameleonic voice unfolding as touchingly in an Adams tune as it did in American folk. Playing with her own band (whose members include Francesco Turrisi, her partner), she was unmoved and charismatic; alongside the Attacca quartet, she simply sat in front of a microphone with a laser focused gaze, commanding the stage with only her sound.

Attacca’s appearance was only too brief, but might justify their own turn to run the festival someday. Whether in the works of Adams, Jessie Montgomery or Caroline Shaw, in the episodic “Benkei’s Standing Death” by Paul Wiancko or in the jam-like “Carrot Revolution” by Gabriella Smith, these players with open ears and open-minded people don’t seem to bring a piece to the scene until it’s engraved in their bones, so much each score is embodied.

There was an overlap of composer and performer in Timo Andres, whose works were well represented but who also served as a soloist – scintillating, patient and tender – in Ingram Marshall’s magnificent piano concerto “Flow”.

Andres then gave a frosty Sunday morning recital that opened with selections from “I Still Play”, a set of miniatures written for Robert Hurwitz, the influential and longtime leader of Nonesuch Records. It continued with one of Samuel Adams’ Impromptus, an inspired piece of keyboard writing designed to complement Schubert, with lightnings by that composer as well as warmth and subtle harmonic undertones to match. And it ended with the first live performance of Smith’s “Imaginary Pancake,” which made a respectable debut online at the start of the pandemic but really roared in person.

In very Ojai fashion, there were so many living composers scheduled that Esa-Pekka Salonen was not even called a headliner. Rather, he was a known quantity that involuntarily faded amid the novelty of the other voices. Carlos Simon’s propulsive and galvanizing “Fate Now Conquers” winked at Beethoven, but on its own cheeky terms. And there are still only promises in the emergence of Inti Figgis-Vizueta, whose “To give you shape and breath”, for three percussionists, slyly distorted time in a juxtaposition of resonating and dull sounds of found objects such as wood and planters.

Much of the real estate was donated to Gabriela Ortiz, who in addition to being performed – providing a wonderfully exciting climax for the festival with an expanded version of her “La calaca” on Sunday night – stepped in as curator when an Anna Margules recital was canceled because she couldn’t travel to the United States. This concert, an investigation of Mexican composers, offered one of the great delights of the festival: percussionist Lynn Vartan in Javier Álvarez’s “Temazcal”, a work for maracas and electronics that demands a dancing performance in a revelation of acoustic possibilities. of an instrument most people treat as just a toy.

Ortiz’s chamber works revealed a knack for surprising acoustic chords, such as two harps and a steel plan in “Río de las Mariposas,” which opened a late-morning concert on Sunday. It’s a sound that had a brother in a premiere that ended this program: “Sunt Lacrimae Rerum” by Dylan Mattingly, its title taken from “The Aeneid”.

The work is also for two harps (Emily Levin and Julie Smith Phillips) – but also for two pianos which, microtonally out of tune, could sometimes be mistaken for the sound of a steel pan. There is a slight dissonance, but not unpleasant; the effect is more like memory distortion. And there was nothing unpleasant about this cry of joy. Ecstasy emanated from the open pianos, played by Joanne Pearce Martin and Vicki Ray, as they were lightly hammered at their upper registers, joined by the sparkle of the music box in the harps.

The mood became more meditative in the comparatively subdued midsection, but the carrying thrill of the opening returned at the end: first in fragments, then at full strength. “Sunt Lacrimae Rerum” was the last work of the festival, a piece that looked back on a year that was traumatic for all of us. But Mattingly met the moment with music that was teeming with provocative and unfazed hope for the future.


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Today in History: the Declared Republic in France https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/today-in-history-the-declared-republic-in-france/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/today-in-history-the-declared-republic-in-france/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 21:35:55 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/today-in-history-the-declared-republic-in-france/ Declared Republic in France September 22 is the 265th (266th day in leap years) of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 100. Railways September 22, 1872 The first train whistle is heard in Haydarpaşa. 30-4 wooden wagons, attracted by small locomotives capable […]]]>
Declared Republic in France

September 22 is the 265th (266th day in leap years) of the year according to the Gregorian calendar. The number of days remaining until the end of the year is 100.

Railways

  • September 22, 1872 The first train whistle is heard in Haydarpaşa. 30-4 wooden wagons, attracted by small locomotives capable of traveling at 5 km / h on the Haydarpaşa Pendik line, began to carry their first passengers.

Olaylar

  • 1792 – The Republic is proclaimed in France.
  • 1903 – Italo Marchioni patents the ice cream cone (cone).
  • 1919 – The Socialist Party of Workers and Farmers of Turkey is founded.
  • 1939 – Earthquake in and around Dikili: More than 100 people died. Dikili and Karaburun were completely destroyed.
  • 1940 – Council of Ministers, The Journal d’Orient He closed his newspaper for seven days. It was alleged that the newspaper made publications contrary to official foreign policy.
  • 1950 – New start Newspaper founder and writer Aziz Nesin was arrested in absentia. Nesin is accused of making “broadcasts aimed at destroying social order”.
  • 1958 – President of CHP İsmet nönü, “The president of the Democratic Party will not be able to say goodbye to democracy.” noted.
  • 1964 – President Cemal Gürsel, convicted of the “Yassıada Trials”; Refik Koraltan pardoned Rüştü Erdelhun, Selim Yatağan and Nedim Ökmen due to illness.
  • 1980 – Beginning of the Iran-Iraq war.
  • 1984 – Villagers protest against the creation of a thermal power station in Gökova Bay.
  • 1986 – After the September 12 coup, Alparslan Türkeş speaks for the first time at the Istanbul rally of the Nationalist Labor Party (MÇP).
  • 1993 – The Metropolitan Museum in New York decides to return the “Treasure of Croesus” to Turkey.
  • 2000 – The Council of Ministers adopts the human rights report in accordance with the Copenhagen criteria.
  • 2002 – In Germany, the Social Democrats, led by Chancellor Gerhard Schröder, became the leading party in parliamentary elections.
  • 2002 – 9 Palestinians are killed in the clash that broke out during the operation organized by Israeli troops in Gaza over the capture of militants.

births

  • 1211 – Ibn-i Khallikan, 13th century historian, jurist and poet (died 1282)
  • 1515 – Anne of Cleves, VIII. Henri’s fourth wife (died 1557)
  • 1552 – IV. Vasily, Tsar of Russia (died 1612)
  • 1593 – Matthäus Merian, Swiss publisher (d. 1650)
  • 1606 – Li Zicheng, founder and sole emperor of the short Shun dynasty of China (d 1645)
  • 1715 – Jean-Étienne Guettard, French naturalist, botanist and mineralogist (died 1786)
  • 1741 – Peter Simon Pallas, Prussian zoologist and botanist (died 1811)
  • 1750 – Christian Konrad Sprengel, German naturalist, theologian and professor (died 1816)
  • 1759 – William Playfair, Scottish engineer and political economist (died 1823)
  • 1791 – Michael Faraday, English physicist (died 1867)
  • 1863 Ferenc Herczeg, Hungarian playwright (died 1954)
  • 1875 – Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis, Lithuanian painter, composer and writer (died 1911)
  • 1878 – Shigeru Yoshida, Japanese politician (died 1967)
  • 1885 – Erich von Stroheim, German actor and director (died 1957)
  • 1895 – Paul Muni, American actor born in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (died 1967)
  • 1901 – Charles Brenton Huggins, American physician, physiologist and Nobel laureate in physiology or medicine (d. 1997)
  • 1902 – Ayatollah Khomeini, Supreme Leader of Iran (died 1989)
  • 1906 – Ilse Koch, Nazi war criminal (died 1967)
  • 1917 – Türkan Aziz, first Turkish Cypriot head nurse (died in 2019)
  • 1931 – Alain Bacquet, French lawyer
  • 1934 – Ayla Erduran, Turkish violinist
  • 1942 – David J. Stern, American sportsman (NBA boss) (d. 2020)
  • 1951 – David Coverdale, English musician and founder and singer of Whitesnake
  • 1954 – Vedat Bilgin, Turkish sociologist, academician, bureaucrat and politician
  • 1957 – Nick Cave, Australian musician
  • 1957 – Refat Chubarov, Ukrainian politician
  • 1958 – Andrea Bocelli, Italian tenor, songwriter and composer
  • 1961 Bonnie Hunt, American actress
  • 1961 Catherine Oxenberg, American actress
  • 1964 – Hasan Basri Güzeloğlu, Turkish bureaucrat
  • 1966 – Erdogan Atalay, Turkish-German actor
  • 1966 – Ruth Jones, Welsh actress
  • 1967 – Félix Savón is a Cuban boxer.
  • 1969 – Yalçın Akdoğan, Turkish politician
  • 1970 – Mystikal, American rapper, songwriter and actor
  • 1970 – Emmanuel Petit, former French footballer
  • 1975 – Elif Güvendik, Turkish producer and presenter
  • 1976 – Martin Solveig, French DJ
  • 1977 – Ali Sunal, Turkish actor in theater, cinema and television series
  • 1978 – Harry Kewell, Australian football player
  • 1981 – Barış Atay, Turkish film and television actor
  • 1981 – Emre Canpolat, Turkish actor
  • 1981 – Sedat Ağçay, Turkish footballer
  • 1982 – Ayben, Turkish rap artist
  • 1982 – Billie Piper, English singer and actress
  • 1982 – Maarten Stekelenburg, Dutch goalkeeper
  • 1983 – Glenn Loovens, Dutch national football player
  • 1983 – Şeref Tüfenk, Turkish wrestler
  • 1984 – Lazar Angelov, Bulgarian fitness model
  • 1984 – Thiago Silva, Brazilian footballer
  • 1985 – Faris Haroun, Belgian footballer
  • 1985 – Tatiana Maslany, Canadian actress
  • 1987 – Tom Felton, English actor
  • 1987 – Tom Hilde, Norwegian ski jumper
  • 1987 – Zdravko Kuzmanović, Serbian football player born in Switzerland
  • 1988 – Nikita Andreyev, Russian football player
  • 1989 – Kim Hyo-yeon is a South Korean singer, rapper, dancer, DJ and television personality.
  • 1990 – Senem Kuyucuoğlu, Turkish model and presenter
  • 1992 – Emin Mehdiyev, Azerbaijani football player
  • 1994 – Enver Cenk Şahin, Turkish football player
  • 1994 – Mohammed Kanu, Saudi national football player
  • 1994 – Park Jin-young, South Korean actor, singer-songwriter, choreographer and dancer
  • 1995 – Nayeon, South Korean singer and dancer
  • 1999 – Kim Yoo-jung, South Korean actress, model and presenter
  • 1999 – Tallan Latz, American guitarist

Armed

  • 1158 – Otto von Freising, German priest and chronicler (born 1114)
  • 1253 – Dōgen, Japanese Zen teacher born in Kyoto and founder of the Zen Soto school in Japan (born 1200)
  • 1408-VII. John, Emperor IV. Son of Andronikos and Bulgarian Keratsa, daughter of Tsar Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria and Theodora of Wallachia (born 1370)
  • 1520 – Yavuz Sultan Selim, 9th Sultan of the Ottoman Empire (born 1470)
  • 1531 – Louise of Savoy, French nobleman, regent of Auvergne and Bourbonnais, Duchess of Nemours and mother of King François I of France (born in 1476)
  • 1539 – Guru Nanak, first guru of the Sikhs (born 1469)
  • 1554 – Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, Spanish explorer (born 1510)
  • 1703 – Vincenzo Viviani, Italian mathematician and scientist (born 1622)
  • 1756 – Abu’l Hasan Ali, second ruler of the Huseyni dynasty and the Principality of Tunisia (born 1688)
  • 1774 – XIV. Clemens, pope from May 19, 1769 to September 22, 1774 (born in 1705)
  • 1828 – Shaka, the most influential chief of the Zulu tribe (born 1787)
  • 1872 – Vladimir Dal, Russian physician, naturalist, lexicographer, linguist (born 1801)
  • 1888 – Gustave Boulanger, French painter of classical figures and naturalist (born in 1824)
  • 1895 – Viktor Rydberg, Swedish writer (born 1828)
  • 1897 – Antônio Conselheiro, Brazilian religious leader and preacher (born in 1830)
  • 1914 – Alain-Fournier (born Henri Alban-Fournier), French writer (died 1886)
  • 1943 – Sedat Nuri İleri, Turkish cartoonist (born 1888)
  • [1945-GalipBahtiyarGökerhommepolitiqueturc(born1881)[1945-GalipBahtiyarGökerhommepolitiqueturc(néen1881)
  • [1945–MürselBakousoldatethommepolitiqueturc(born1881)[1945–MürselBakousoldatethommepolitiqueturc(néen1881)
  • 1952 – Kaarlo Juho Ståhlberg, first President of the Republic of Finland (born 1865)
  • 1956 – Frederick Soddy, English chemist and Nobel Laureate (born 1877)
  • 1960 – Melanie Klein, British psychoanalyst (born 1882)
  • 1969 – Adolfo López Mateos, Mexican politician (born 1909)
  • 1969 – Alexandras Stulginskis, second President of Lithuania (born 1885)
  • 1973 – Paul van Zeeland, Belgian lawyer, economist, Catholic politician and statesman (born 1893)
  • 1979 – Ebu’l-A’lâ Mawdudi, Pakistani commentator, Islamic scholar, journalist and writer (born 1903)
  • 1985 – Axel Springer, German publisher (born 1912)
  • 1989 – Irving Berlin, American composer and songwriter (born 1888)
  • 1994 – Hedwig Potthast, mistress of Heinrich Himmler (born 1912)
  • 1996 – Dorothy Lamour, American actress (born 1914)
  • 1999 – George C. Scott, American actor and Oscar winner (born 1927)
  • 2001 – Fikret Kızılok, Turkish composer and music performer (born 1946)
  • 2001 – Isaac Stern, Russian-American violinist (born 1920)
  • 2004 – Big Boss Man, American professional wrestler (born 1963)
  • 2007 – Marcel Marceau, French pantomime (born in 1923)
  • 2008 – Hadi Çaman, Turkish theater artist (born 1943)
  • 2008 – Thomas Dörflein, German zookeeper (born 1963)
  • 2010 – Jackie Burroughs, Anglo-Canadian actress (born 1939)
  • 2010 – Eddie Fisher, American singer (born 1928)
  • 2010 – Jorge González, Argentine-American professional wrestler and basketball player (born 1966)
  • 2011 – Cengiz Dağcı, Crimean Tatar writer and poet (born 1919)
  • 2011 – Aristides Pereira, Cape Verdean politician (born in 1923)
  • 2011 – Knut Steen, Norwegian sculptor (born 1924)
  • 2011 – Vesta Williams, American soul singer, songwriter and actress (born 1957)
  • 2013 – David H. Hubel, American neurophysiologist (born 1926)
  • 2013 – Álvaro Mutis, Colombian writer, poet, columnist, publisher, filmmaker (born 1923)
  • 2013 – Luciano Vincenzoni, Italian playwright (born in 1926)
  • 2014 – Hans E. Wallman, Swedish director and producer (born 1936)
  • 2015 – Yogi Berra, legendary American baseball player and coach (born 1925)
  • 2017 – Paavo Olavi Lonkila, Finnish cross-country skier (born 1923)
  • 2017 – Börje Vestlund, Swedish politician (born 1960)
  • 2018 – Avi Duan, Israeli politician (born 1955)
  • 2018 – Chas Hodges, English singer and musician (born 1943)
  • 2018 – Al Matthews is a black American singer, actor and dubbing artist (born 1942)
  • 2018 – Edna Molewa, South African politician and minister (born 1957)
  • 2019 – Vytautas Briedis, Lithuanian professional rower (born 1940)
  • 2019 – Sándor Sára, Hungarian cinema and cinematographer (born 1933)
  • 2020 – Michael Gwisdek, German actor and director (born 1942)
  • 2020 – Frie Leysen, Belgian festival organizer and artistic director (born 1950)
  • 2020 – Jacques Sénard, French diplomat (born in 1919)
  • 2020 – Road Warrior Animal, American professional wrestler (born 1960)
  • 2020 – Agne Simonsson, former Swedish international football player (born 1935)
  • 2020 – Ashalata Wabgaonkar, Indian actress (born 1941)

Holidays and special occasions


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Toulouse remembers 31 dead in AZF factory explosion 20 years ago https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/toulouse-remembers-31-dead-in-azf-factory-explosion-20-years-ago/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/toulouse-remembers-31-dead-in-azf-factory-explosion-20-years-ago/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 11:04:03 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/toulouse-remembers-31-dead-in-azf-factory-explosion-20-years-ago/ Associations of victims, former factory employees and elected officials gathered in Toulouse this morning (September 21) to commemorate the deadly explosion of the AZF factory that occurred 20 years ago today. The explosion was the biggest industrial disaster in France for several decades, killing 31 people and injuring 1,500. Every year, on September 21, a […]]]>

Associations of victims, former factory employees and elected officials gathered in Toulouse this morning (September 21) to commemorate the deadly explosion of the AZF factory that occurred 20 years ago today.

The explosion was the biggest industrial disaster in France for several decades, killing 31 people and injuring 1,500.

Every year, on September 21, a siren sounds at 10:17 a.m., time of the explosion, and a minute of silence is observed on the site of the old factory.

This year, the mayor of Toulouse Jean-Luc Moudenc unveiled a remembrance trail around the existing memorial, made up of nine panels that tell the story of the factory and the disaster that occurred there.

On September 21, 2021, hundreds of tons of ammonium nitrate exploded in the factory, causing an explosion that left a crater six meters deep, 5 km south of downtown Toulouse.

The factory itself was completely destroyed and severe damage was done to buildings in the southwest of the city, including schools, shops and homes.

The sound of the explosion could be heard 80 km away and caused a seismic shock with a magnitude of 3.4.

A reader of Connexion, who then lived near Toulouse (11 km west of the city) remembers the explosion very well.

The woman, who asked to remain anonymous, said: “I was 13 and I was in school, in history class, when it happened. There was a huge “boom” and all the windows and doors in the school suddenly opened. None of us knew what it was.

“We were all sent home very soon after that, and people were warned to cover their faces and not to go outside. We didn’t know what had happened, what was the cause of the explosion or if the cloud was toxic. Everything was very uncertain.

Factory owners convicted of manslaughter

Investigations revealed that several factors caused the explosion.

The initial chemical reaction was caused by a plant worker who spilled 500 kg of chlorine on stockpiles of ammonium nitrate. However, the ammonium nitrate was initially stored in an unsafe manner and investigations revealed that the conditions in the hangar before the explosion, which were confined and humid, also contributed to the magnitude of the explosion.

Finally, the courts condemned the company that ran the factory, Grande Paroisse, and the factory manager, Serge Bichelin, for manslaughter and injuries.

Of the 31 people who died, about 20 were factory workers. The majority of physical injuries caused were to people’s hearing due to the impact of the explosion or flying debris such as shards of glass.

The incident also had a profound psychological impact, with some estimates indicating that 18 months later, 14,000 people were being treated for problems with sleep, anxiety and depression.

Our reader told us, “It was even stranger and more frightening because it happened right after 9/11. [which had happened just 10 days before].

“Everyone was still in shock, then we had this massive ‘boom’ close to us. No one knew if it was a terrorist attack, a bomb, an explosion or what. It was scary.”

What protections exist in France for hazardous chemical factory sites?

The AZF factory was covered by a “Seveso II” directive, which entered into force in 1999.

This had replaced a 1982 directive that aimed to offer more protection following accidents at work in the 1970s, the European Commission (EC) heard in a debate on the subject in 2001.

Officials at the AZF plant had carried out risk assessments to comply with this directive, but that had not included ammonium nitrate.

After the disaster, the EC debated the introduction of a new article in the Seveso II Directive, which would regulate the separation of hazardous sites and inhabited areas or places where the public is likely to be present.

On June 1, 2015, the Seveso III Directive entered into force, replacing the Seveso II rules. A key change in the Seveso III Directive included an obligation for factories and local authorities to test disaster contingency plans.

The “Seveso” directives are European classifications of factories which store or use dangerous chemicals in France. They are named after the Italian town of Seveso, which suffered a terrible accident at work in 1976.

They aim to prevent major industrial accidents and to limit the consequences of their use for humans or the environment.

Chemical sites are classified according to the risk they present, within the Seveso directive. These include the “Top Tier” and “Upper Tier” establishments, which are the most dangerous.

Seveso III regulations also specify that sites must now “take into account hazardous substances which it is reasonable to predict that they may be generated by loss of control”.

The purpose of classification means that if something were to happen, emergency services and responders have a defined process for how to respond and what to expect.

In French, the classifications are “Seuil Bas” (Low threshold, lower risk) and “Seuil Haut” (High threshold, higher risk).

Where are the Seveso factories and sites in France?

There are currently 1,171 Seveso sites across the country, classified as such because of their storage or the use of potentially hazardous industrial chemicals.

They are usually found in more industrial and urban areas, like Paris, Marseille and Lille, but some are located in more rural places like the Dordogne.

After the explosion and fire at an ExxonMobile Seveso site in Rouen, in October 2019, the Sciences et Avenir site drew up a map of the locations of these sites in France, using data from the French government.

Map: Sarah Daz / Sciences et Avenir

You can zoom in on the map and click on each “point” to get more details about the site there.

Residents in France have the legal right to challenge the construction projects of any new Seveso site near them, if they believe that the correct channels and safety rules were not followed during the installation of the said site. site.

Despite the directives, chemical incidents continue to occur in France.

The most recent Lubrizol explosion in Rouen closed schools, allocated food, forced people to leave their homes and sent a plume of poisonous smoke to the UK; while another similar chemical plant was closed a week later for security reasons.

Related Articles

French city on alert after chemical plant explosion

Another French chemical plant closed on security alert


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France asks “forgiveness” for its abandonment of the Algerian harkis https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/france-asks-forgiveness-for-its-abandonment-of-the-algerian-harkis/ https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/france-asks-forgiveness-for-its-abandonment-of-the-algerian-harkis/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 22:04:42 +0000 https://chateau-de-villesavin-41.com/france-asks-forgiveness-for-its-abandonment-of-the-algerian-harkis/ PARIS – President Emmanuel Macron, continuing his attempt to resolve some of his country’s most painful colonial legacies, today asked for “forgiveness” on behalf of France for the abandonment of the hundreds of thousands of Algerian Arabs who have fought alongside France in Algeria. independance War. At the end of the Eight Years’ War in […]]]>

PARIS – President Emmanuel Macron, continuing his attempt to resolve some of his country’s most painful colonial legacies, today asked for “forgiveness” on behalf of France for the abandonment of the hundreds of thousands of Algerian Arabs who have fought alongside France in Algeria. independance War.

At the end of the Eight Years’ War in 1962, the more than 200,000 Algerians who had sided with the French army were abandoned to their fate, while France had indicated that it would take care of them. them. Many have been tortured and massacred by the Algerian authorities after a war characterized by singular brutality.

Algerian anger against the “Harkis,” as they are called in France, was so deep that even in 2000, during a visit to Paris, former Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika compared them to Nazi collaborators.

Regarded as traitors in their homeland, around 90,000 Harkis managed to flee to France – as did around 800,000 “Pieds-Noirs”, French Algerians of European origin – but they met with a hostile reception. They were a reminder of a lost war. Former President Charles de Gaulle, who ended the war, despised them. Undesirable foreigners, the Harkis were held in camps with their families, often in appalling conditions.

” I ask forgiveness. We will not forget, “Macron said during a ceremony at the Élysée. France has” failed in its duty, “he told around 300 Harkis and their families.” I want to express our gratitude to our fighters. ”

The president, who faces an election in just over six months, said his government would draft a law providing “reparations” for the Harkis. It was a formal recognition of state responsibility, first accepted by the previous president, François Hollande.

The Harki organizations said that only such a law could end “60 years of certain hypocrisy”.

Mr. Macron, 43, is the first French president born after the Algerian war of independence. He took several steps to shed light belatedly on a painful chapter in French history, including acknowledging the widespread use of torture and the brutal murder of a prominent Algerian lawyer, Ali Boumendjel. France had claimed for decades that he had committed suicide.

Ending 132 years of French colonization, the Algerian War, fought from 1954 to 1962, left half a million dead according to French accounts, and 1.5 million dead according to Algeria. He divided France into fiercely opposing factions that threatened to tear the country apart, with rumors of a military coup in 1958 and an attempted coup in 1961.

A peace agreement was signed on March 18, 1962 and approved by an overwhelming majority by French voters, paving the way for Algerian independence.

A report on the war commissioned by Mr Macron led to the creation of a Memories and Truth Commission, in an effort to heal some of the lingering wounds. But Algeria’s calls for an official apology from France have not been met. Mr Macron insisted that there would be “no repentance, no apologies”.

The request for forgiveness bordered on repentance, but of course it was addressed to Algerians who fought alongside France.

The 60th anniversary of the end of the war will be marked in March next year, a month before the first round of the presidential election. Mr. Macron is determined to advance his quest for Franco-Algerian reconciliation by then, in part to ward off Marine Le Pen’s anti-immigrant challenge. The Harkis have in the past shown strong support for its right-wing National Rally, formerly the National Front.


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